Posts tagged with "Driehaus Prize":

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Classicists Honor Their Own: David Schwarz Wins 2015 Driehaus Prize

Washington, D.C.–based David M. Schwarz has been named the 2015 Richard H. Driehaus laureate. The prize, which is administered by the University of Notre Dame, will be presented on March 21 in Chicago, and is given "to honor lifelong contributions to traditional, classical and sustainable architecture and urbanism in the modern world." It comes with a $200,000 purse. Schwarz has designed a number of civic and commercial buildings around the country, including major performing arts centers in Las Vegas, Nashville, Fort Worth, Texas and Carmel, Indiana. Schwarz's buildings draw on a variety of historical styles, sometimes in simplified forms. Other buildings are elaborately encrusted with statuary and ornament. “David Schwarz has succeeded in establishing a renewed and spirited dialogue about the nature of architecture and urbanism in the post-war period,” said Michael Lykoudis, Driehaus Prize jury chair and dean of Notre Dame’s School of Architecture, in a statement. “He has woven traditional principles with modernity throughout various scales and building types that characterize our contemporary world. His approach to significant commercial and institutional buildings as well as urban design indicates his sensitivity to how buildings’ characters contribute to a sense of place. The Henry Hope Reed, which is given to non-architects who support the foundation's mission of promoting classicism, traditional architecture, and sustainable urbanism, will be given to Dr. Richard J. Jackson, a professor of environmental health at the School of Public Health at UCLA. He is the co-author of  Urban Sprawl and Public Health. The Henry Hope Reed prize winner receives $50,000.
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Pier Carlo Bontempi Named 2014 Driehaus Laureate

The Italian classicist architect Pier Carlo Bontempi has been named the 2014 Driehaus Laureate.  A native of Parma, Bontempi's work in Italy and France re-imagines the traditional city with projects like a master-planned block in Parma and the Quartier du Lac outside Paris. "His buildings, seamlessly woven into their urban environments, demonstrate principles of the new classicism and urbanism," said Michael Lykoudis, dean of the school of architecture at the University of Notre Dame, in a statement. "Their durable construction, adaptive interior spaces and sensitive siting make them exemplars of architecture as an art of conservation and investment as opposed to consumption and waste." The $200,000 Driehaus prize, underwritten by the Chicago-based Richard Driehaus Foundation, is administered by the school of architecture at the University of Notre Dame. It recognizes "a living architect whose work embodies the highest ideals of traditional and classical architecture in contemporary society, and creates a positive cultural, environmental, and artistic impact." Previous winners include Robert A.M. Stern, Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Leon Krier, and Abdel-Wahed El-Wakil. While the purse is twice that of the Pritzker Prize, the Driehaus is still somewhat confined within the worlds or classicism, new urbanism, and historic preservation, as AN previously pointed out in a report of the overlapping world of the honorees and jurors. Along with the Driehaus prize, the foundation and school also award the $50,000 Henry Hope Reed prize, for individuals working outside of architecture to promote traditional city making. Ruan Yisan, a professor of urban planning and Director of the National Research Center of the Historic City at Tonji University, is this year's Henry Hope Reed Laureate.
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Thomas H. Beeby To Win 2013 Driehaus Prize

One of the “Chicago Seven” architects who broke with the city’s modernist aesthetic during the 1970s and 80s, Thomas H. Beeby, will receive the 2013 Richard H. Driehaus Prize. Considered the traditionalist’s Pritzker Prize, the Driehaus comes with a $200,000 purse and denotes a lifetime of contributions to classicism in contemporary built work. Beeby’s rational design is evident in downtown Chicago’s Harold Washington Library. The design pulls core structural elements towards the outside—“an inversion of Mies,” Beeby said, but also a nod to classical construction—exposing structural columns that serve dual purposes as functional elements and ornamental city landmarks. Amid the building’s red brick and granite blocks, ornamental elements display a blended architectural language that is typical of postmodern design: the Board of Trade’s Ceres appears along with corncob spandrels and seed pods representing the bounty of the Midwest, while the form evokes proto-skyscrapers like the nearby Rookery and Monadnock buildings. As a principal at HBRA Architects, Beeby’s portfolio of built work includes many museums, libraries, university buildings, and other institutional projects. His work on churches has made an impact on the discourse of spiritual architecture. Previous Driehaus laureates include Michael Graves, Robert A.M. Stern, and Rafael Manzano Martos. The foundation also gives out the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Awards for Architectural Excellence in Community Design.
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Driehaus Awards the Much-Awarded Stern

The University of Notre Dame School of Architecture announced that Robert A. M. Stern has been named this year's Richard H. Driehaus laureate. The prize, which comes with a $200,000 purse, "honors the best practitioners of traditional, classical, and sustainable architecture and urbanism in the modern world," according to a statement. Founded in 2003, the prize has previously honored lesser known architects such as Rafael Manzano Martos of Spain and Abdel-Wahed El-Wakil of Egypt in addition to marquee American traditional and classicist architects like Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk and Allan Greenberg (several Driehaus recipients have also won or been involved in the National Building Museum's Vincent Scully Prize). Stern's office told AN that he will donate his award to Yale, where he is the Dean of the School of Architecture. Stern's career has covered furniture design, residences, skyscrapers, civic buildings, and town plans, in a variety of historical and modern styles. He is also a noted architectural historian, particularly for his collection of books on New York City. The Comcast Center in Philadelphia is Stern's tallest building to date, and one of his most unabashedly modern designs, though the Driehaus committee was quick to point out its resemblance to an obelisk. Stern designed the masterplan for Celebration Florida, a New Urbanist community originally developed by Disney. Detractors have called the project "sprawl in drag." 15 Central Park West is now one of the New York's most expensive addresses. Stern adapted the forms and style of early classic 20th century apartment houses for contemporary life. The Nashville public library was completed in 2001. A neo-classical residence in Seaside, Florida, the first New Urbanist community, completed in 2006. Robert A. M. Stern.