Posts tagged with "Distilleries":

Placeholder Alt Text

Bulleit opens new Kentucky distillery campus

Bulleit Distilling Co., maker of Bulleit whiskey, celebrated its 30th anniversary in a big way with the opening of a completely new distillery (and probably a few sips of its amber-colored product). While Bulleit is now owned by London-based Diageo PLC, the grand opening of the new facility also coincides with founder Tom Bulleit’s birthday.

Set on 300 acres outside Shelbyville, Kentucky, the new distillery leverages the latest in warehousing and distilling processes to reduce its impact on the environment. Included in the new facility is the first industrial solar array in the area. The solar array is able to collect enough energy to run all the distillery’s on-site mobile equipment. An overall modular design also means that the layout was able to be carried out with as little tree clearing as possible. The land planning, civil engineering, surveying, and landscape architecture were all carried out by Louisville-based Land Design & Development (LD&D). LD&D was also the local planning consultant.

Until the completion of the new distillery, Bulleit Bourbon was distilled at another company’s facility. Now able to produce 1.8 million proof gallons of whiskey per year in house, Bulleit has greatly improved control over its own distilling process. The company can now more easily explore the production of other lines of whiskey as well. At the heart of the operation is a 52-foot still, designed and built by Louisville-based Vendome Copper & Brass Works. Four barrel houses on the campus are able to hold 55,000 barrels for aging.

“Seeing this distillery come to life has been a truly surreal experience that couldn’t have been achieved without the tireless work of so many men and women,” said Tom Bulleit at the opening. Yet the story of Bulleit is just as surreal. According to Tom Bulleit, the first Bulleit Bourbon was made by his great-great-grandfather, Augustus Bulleit, in pre-Civil War Kentucky. The legend goes that after loading up a boat with barrels of bourbon and heading off to New Orleans in 1860, Augustus was never seen again. 

While the $115 million project is not yet open to the public, guests can visit the new Bulleit Frontier Whiskey Experience in the company’s original Louisville, Kentucky, distillery as they work their way down the Kentucky Bourbon Trail.

Placeholder Alt Text

Archtober Building of the Day #24> Kings County Distillery at the Brooklyn Navy Yard

Archtober Building of the Day #24 Kings County Distillery 63 Flushing Avenue, Brooklyn Kushner Studios Three days of Archtober rain have finally given way to a chilly day washed clear—perfect weather for an adventure to the Brooklyn Navy Yard. A crowd of Archtober faithful was on hand (despite the conspicuous post-Heritage Ball hangover of the author) for a hair of the dog moment with Master Distiller Colin Spoelman and architect John Bedard at the Kings County Distillery. The building, solid brick and well detailed in 1899, originally served as the Navy Paymaster Office. The Navy left the yard in 1966, and the structure joined the many others awaiting new and viable economic use. After a brief stint as a Jewish funeral shroud manufacturing facility, it was rescued by the hipster distillers now making their way in the world of craft booze. Spoelman gave a lively history of the neighborhood which was the historic home to many distillers. We heard stories of the Whiskey Wars of Brooklyn, tax evasion, gangs, crooks, and the heavy hand of the revenue men. We also learned how whiskey is made, and enjoyed, to the extent possible, the strong odor of the process. Vats of yellow corn goo in the process of fermentation, were in big, open wood tanks. Inquisitive insects lazily sipped from the open containers. Huge one-ton sacks of corn were piled up along one side of the still room. The copper-pot still itself was a voluptuous decanter, piped and valved, with a final trickle of clear moonshine issuing forth into a waiting vessel. Upstairs are the Boozeum and the Barrel Room. Apparently the Barrel Room can be rented as a wedding venue (I wonder what they do about the smell). The whole enterprise seems to be a mirror of hipster chic: locavore, sustainable, micro-business, full of fantastic arcana, and ever so retrospective. Our crowd huddled in for tasting of three liquors. I abstained, but others reported sophisticated flavor, smooth finish, and a nice woody middle.
Cynthia Phifer Kracauer, AIA, is the Managing Director of the Center for Architecture and the festival director for Archtober:  Architecture and Design Month NYC.  She was previously a partner at Butler Rogers Baskett, and from 1989-2005 at Swanke Hayden Connell.  After graduating from Princeton (AB 1975, M.Arch 1979) she worked for Philip Johnson,  held faculty appointments at the University of Virginia, NJIT, and her alma mater.
Placeholder Alt Text

Heatherwick Studio’s Plan for Bombay Sapphire Distillery Are Wildly Green

Bombay Sapphire is in the process of converting a historic paper mill into a facility for producing their famous gin. Overseeing this transformation is the ever-busy Heatherwick Studio, which has been brought on to renovate the 40 derelict buildings found on the site. Their most drastic intervention to the extant campus comes in the form of a soon-to-opened visitor's center that was recently awarded a BREEAM 'outstanding' rating for sustainability, an international system for ranking green buildings. The building is composed of the original structure and two new large glass outgrowths that are seemingly blown out of its interior and into a surrounding body of water. These alien forms are, in fact, drawn from the shapes of the curvaceous copper stills traditionally employed in gin distillation. One temperate, the other humid, the two greenhouses are populated by the various botanicals incorporated into gin production. The glass additions sit partially in the shallows of the River Test that snakes through the entirety of the mill. Integrated photovoltaic cells, a biomass boiler for recycling organic matter, and energy-producing water turbines all contribute to the center's elevated BREEAM status. The watery foundations of the greenhouses are indicative of Heatherwick's attempts to emphasize the role of the river in their refurbishment of the site. The firm hopes to increase the Test's visibility while using it as an organizational device for traversing the numerous buildings in the facility.