Posts tagged with "Diners":

Developer and architect Hodgetts+Fung share ideas about Los Angeles’ iconic Norms site

In January AN reported that developer Jason Illouilian (who owns development company Faring Capital) had bought legendary Los Angeles diner Norms, and was considering what to do next with the property. Last week LA Magazine reported that Illouilian plans to build "a community of shops" where the Armet & Davis-designed restaurant's parking lot now stands. He's looking for upscale tenants, like those at the Brentwood Country Mart. (Those include retailers like James Perse and Jenny Kayne and a mix of high-brow and low-brow restaurants and stands.) The developer added that while he hopes to keep the building a 24-hour diner, he noted that it could be "Norms or Somebody else." Culver City–based Hodgetts + Fung are preparing plans for the site. Firm principal Craig Hodgetts confirmed to AN that the firm is considering a two-story development with underground parking next to the original building. "It will certainly not emulate the original building," Hodgetts told AN. The National Trust is very clear about delineating what was original and what is a later addition. "It’s very much a background to Norms. It makes Norms a showpiece." The site has a 1.5 FAR and a 45-foot height limit, he said. He wants to maintain view lines to Norms from La Cienega. "That's pretty darn important," he said. Views from smaller streets might be altered. Hodgetts + Fung will also be renovating Norms, "bringing back its vitality" by bringing back its original paint, tiles, glass, and colors," said Hodgetts. As for whether Norms would be staying, Hodgetts replied: "It's unclear who the operator will be. Given the climate on La Cienega and the parking situation it’s not likely to be a roadside type of service… It's not our decision about the operator. I love Norms. I've had many many chocolate milkshakes there. But the model of a drive in restaurant is not a viable model in a high density urban environment." While Norm's has received a temporary landmark status, LA's Cultural Heritage Commission will vote on March 19 on whether it will receive permanent status. Even with landmark status Illoulian could change the building's owners or use, but he could not tear it down. Hodgetts said that he and Illoulian were being very conscientious about having a dialogue with the community. "We want to go step by step with great care with the conservancy and people who are concerned about the building. We’ll be having conversations with them about our plans before we really have a scheme defined," he noted.

Hof’s Hut, another famed California mid-century diner, in trouble after back-to-back fires

While it appears that Los Angeles' famed Norms restaurant is safe, at least for the moment, another local dining landmark is in trouble: Hof's Hut, in Long Beach, which recently suffered "significant damage" due to multiple fires, according to the LA Times. Designed by mid-century architect Edward Killingsworth, the restaurant's exposed post and beam structure and massive windows (now partially hidden by ugly awnings) helped make it a classic for more than half a century. Inspectors are still attempting to determine the cause of the back-to-back fires. To this point the restaurant has not released plans on rebuilding, but in a statement said, “We are devastated by the fire and loss of our Long Beach Blvd. restaurant."  There are three other Hof's Huts remaining in Southern California.

Another of Los Angeles’ Famed Googie Diners, Pepy’s Galley, Closes For Good

Long-time Mar Vista Lanes diner, Pepy’s Galley, an iconic, authentically Googie-style restaurant, closed its doors forever on Monday. By most accounts, the interior will be a total loss, as the building’s new owner, BowlmorAMF, intends to convert Pepy’s into a catering space for the adjacent bowling alley. The Mar Vista Lanes complex was designed by famed architects Armet & Davis, a seminal Los Angeles firm also known for Pann’s and the original Norm’s restaurant. For longtime business owner, Joseph "Pepy" Gonzalez, the decision marks the end of a 45-year association with the restaurant, first as an employee and then as proprietor. Pepy's is on a month-to-month lease from the bowling alley, so he’s only had 30 days to wrap up his operations. “This neighborhood is a family-oriented place,” said Pepy. “That’s how I run my restaurant—the employees are my kids, and you customers are my family.” The family nature of the restaurant is reflected in the multiple uses of the bowling alley complex, which also includes an arcade area and a bar with a separate entrance. Located along Venice Boulevard, just east of Centinela, the bowling alley retains many of its authentic architectural details, including a cast-concrete block façade that angles back from the property line to open up views and create visual interest. Mar Vista Lanes opened in 1961 with a Tiki-themed bar; you can still find a single carved wood Tiki column outside the entrance to Pepy’s. It’s unclear whether the new owners will retain these classic architectural elements. In the meantime, a Facebook group has been established, seeking to prevent the closure, although the new owners have released a statement suggesting it was too late. Jon Yoder, associate professor of architecture at Ohio’s Kent State University and an authority on the visuality of Los Angeles architecture, as well as a longtime Pepy’s customer, lamented the loss of yet another Googie-style temple to the greasy spoon. Taking time out from eating a custom, off-the-menu breakfast burrito recently at Pepy’s, Yoder reflected on the nuanced visual complexity of the Googie style, something he views as lost in the chain restaurant culture that dominates most American cities. “The spatial configuration forces mixing of different sizes of parties and types of people,” Yoder said, noting tightly controlled nautical themed space with counter seating, fixed booths, and combinable booths with flip-up table wings. “There’s some place for everyone here.” This visual complexity was not accidental. In 1980, the late historian Esther McCoy wrote in the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner of the influence of the style, which emerged following the original Googie’s diner designed by John Lautner in 1949 and built next to the famous Schwab’s pharmacy. That diner, which has been replaced by a bland multi-story, mixed-use shopping center at Sunset Boulevard and Laurel Canyon, marked a shift, in McCoy’s view, on how restaurant design could locate the viewer in space. “For the first time the tables and booths in a small restaurant were oriented to the outside rather than the cash register…” wrote McCoy. “Through large windows at the front and side was a view of the hills in the distance, the stream of traffic in the middle ground, and in the foreground you could see who was going in or out of Schwab’s.” From the vantage point of a booth at Pepy’s, McCoy could have been describing either diner. Googie diners are becoming rare specimens in Los Angeles, even though the style ranks as an icon of the city’s taste culture. But like much of the city’s architectural production, historically weighted toward commercial returns and public trends, eventually mainstream fascination wanes and developers seek fresher aspirational expressions of consumer fantasy. That said, no one can argue with the classic that is Pepy’s off-the-menu breakfast burrito.