Posts tagged with "Delta":

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The 2018 International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam asks designers to confront climate change

Instead of the traditional call for projects, the International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam (IABR) has released a call for practices for its 2018 and 2020 editions, which will share a common mission and focus on the environment. The biennials, collectively called The Missing Link, tackle the role of design in confronting climate change. The curators want participants generate actionable responses to some of the UN’s sustainable development goals, which were released after the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement. IABR curators are asking designers and others to engage renewable energy systems, water management, sustainable agriculture, biodiversity, and resource management within cities to provide research and design rubrics that encourage positive change in these fields. The Missing Link will proceed in three stages. The 2018 edition is framed as a "work biennale,” while the years between the 2018 and 2020 biennials will be devoted to research on shifting these ideas into practical use, and the results will be shared with the world in the 2020 program. IABR hopes that the three year process will establish a "community of practice" that results in a shared biennial to be presented in both the Netherlands and Belgium. The curatorial team includes Floris Alkemade, Leo van Broeck, and Joachim Declerck. The trio of Belgian and Dutch curators will work on both biennials. The base of operations for the entire project will be the Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt delta in the Netherlands, a site the curators chose for its connection to cities and the natural environment. At the confluence of three major rivers, the delta links together a series of major ports including Rotterdam, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Vlissingen, and Ghent. IABR 2018 will debut on May 31 and run through July 8, 2018, and IABR is scheduled for spring 2020. Applications for IABR 2018 and 2020 are open until November 22, 2017.
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Specsheet > The smartest smart-building systems

NEST CAM IQ indoor Nest This indoor security camera has a 6-core processor that has the ability to do things like tell a person from a thing. It can recognize faces and has HDR with invisible infrared LEDs that evenly illuminate an entire whole room. Security alerts are sent to your phone in real time. STILLPURE Franke The newest offering in Franke's line of sustainable products, StillPure is a complete under-sink filtration system. It improves the odor and color of water by removing toxins, parasites, cysts, and bacteria. StillPure comes with the Franke Filtration App and syncs with a Bluetooth monitor that easily attaches to the filtration system.
 
 
TXPERT DIGITAL TRANSFORMER ABB The new TXpert transformer has fully-integrated sensing technology that allows the user to get information from both the transformer and grid to run predictive inference analytics. To address safety concerns, ABB ensured the data from the transformer is accessed via a built-in wi-fi router protected by encryption.
VIVE Lutron A scalable wireless lighting control solution for new and existing commercial buildings, Lutron Vive with Vue software allows users to adjust and program system settings on their smartphone devices. It also automatically finds nearby devices—making set-up and management more efficient.
CLIMATE CONTROL ZONING SYSTEM II Uponor The Uponor Climate Control Zoning System II works with underfloor heating installations and provides temperature control for each individual room. The thermostats communicate with the base unit by radio link and the new system has a 25 percent faster reaction time and up to 20 percent greater energy savings for radiant floor heating systems.
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Specsheet >The newest (and smartest) building technologies on the market

Monitor and adjust smart-building systems from virtually anywhere, thanks to a host of technologies that turn your phone into a mini control center. AUGUST SMART LOCK August Home The Smart Lock's Auto-Unlock feature allows for keyless entry when the owner returns home—so one never has to worry about keys or security. Alerts give users real-time updates about any interaction with the lock or entry. Users can also set the system to Away Mode, which lets the lock know the user has “left the neighborhood.” VIVE Lutron A scalable wireless lighting control solution for new and existing commercial buildings, Lutron Vive with Vue software allows users to adjust and program system settings on their smartphone devices. It also automatically finds nearby devices, making set up and management more efficient. DIAMOND CONTROLS SOLUTION Mitsubishi Electric Diamond Controls building management system can be accessed at any time from any location, making monitoring the facility much more efficient for staff and building managers. Reports, analyses, and real-time information about how 
the building’s systems react to user behavior are easily accessible. Displayable trends include building and space occupancy, carbon dioxide levels, energy generation, energy usage, and humidity levels. Representations can be displayed in 3-D graphics. KONE CARE KONE KONE Care allows businesses and building managers to request and customize elevator technology systems based on their buildings' needs. As part of KONE Care, KONE has also launched 24/7 Connected Services, which uses the IBM Watson Internet of Things platform, enabling data from elevator sensors to be displayed, monitored, and analyzed in real time. DELTA LEAK DETECTOR Delta Designed with a one-touch button, this battery-powered leak detector wirelessly syncs to smartphones, tablets, and wi-fi. The unit’s conductor ring detects moisture dripping over or gathering under the device and sends alerts to the user’s smartphone or tablet. ONEPREVENT OneEvent OneEvent’s new monitoring system, OnePrevent, has a predictive analytics engine embedded inside a series of sensing devices to flag potential building hazards. It can detect whether stoves are on or off, sense if there is moisture coming from a leaky pipe, and alert the user via an app for smartphones and tablets.
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Product> Wrap It Up: Durable and Protective Weather Barriers

Protect building projects from the effects of Mother Nature with these powerful and long-lasting weather barriers, which provide air, water, wind, and thermal protection. SoftTouch Duct Wrap CertainTeed Sustainable Insulation Composed of both recycled and renewable content, this resilient fiberglass insulation reduces unwanted heat gain or loss in heating, ventilating, and air conditioning ductwork. It comes as either an unfaced blanket or with FSK, gray PSK, or white PSK vapor retarder facings. Topfix VMS Velux and Renson This motor-operated, wind- and weather-resistant sunscreen is compatible with both fixed and movable VELUX Modular Skylight modules. Topfix VMS minimizes glare and reflection, and it’s equipped with RENSON’s ZipShade technology, which offers fabric tension and wind resistance up to 75 mph. LIQUIDARMOR CM Flashing and Sealant Dow Chemical Company Designed to provide commercial buildings with moisture- and air-sealing protection, this sprayable, water-based coating covers and seals gaps as large as a quarter inch wide. It’s suitable for a range of surfaces, such as tapes, wood buck, and foam boards. R-Guard SureSpan EX PROSOCO A high-performance silicone material consumes both thermal movement and wind-loading stresses. It creates a long-lasting, flexible, and elastomeric seal that connects air and water barriers with building curtain walls, storefronts, or windows. DuPont Tyvek ThermaWrap R5.0 DuPont Providing air, water, and thermal protection, this breathable weather barrier is equipped with six-inch uninsulated fl aps that can be installed like shingles. Tyvek allows moisture inside building walls to dry quickly and escape to the exterior, reducing both water damage and mold build-up. DELTA-VENT SA Delta Featuring a three-ply membrane, this water-resistive and air barrier works hard to eliminate leaks at fasteners and increase air tightness. The top and bottom layers consist of spun-bonded polypropylene, while the center layer is made of a vapor-permeable, water-tight polymeric sheet.
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The Future Future of JFK Terminal 4

If this rendering of Terminal 4 at JFK looks familiar, good. That means you're reading, as it, or something very much like it, was in our story last week about the Port Authority and Delta's plans for expanding the terminal. What is different, though, if you look closely, is the number of gates. This rendering was released by Delta last week, though it initially confounded us because the talk had been of nine new gates, not the 30 we counted when we compared it to the terminal's current layout, which you can see and compare after the jump. It turns out, the wrong rendering had been released, and this is in fact the ultimate plans for the future development of Terminal 4, with 10 new gates on Concourse A (right) and 11 more added to Delta's nine on Concourse B (left). That makes for a total of 46 gates—larger than some mid-sized airports—up from a current 16. No wonder they have to tear down Terminal 3 to make room for more plane parking. But not before Hal Hayes has something to say about it. Hayes was the lead planner at SOM when it created the current Terminal 4 a decade-and-a-half ago, and then he filled a similar role at HOK when it developed a prior plan for Delta at JFK. Now on his own, the architect takes issue with the preservationists we spoke to last week—to his mind, Terminal 3 is easily the most important of all at JFK, even compared to Saarinen's Terminal 5, which he said is formally but not functionally groundbreaking. As for the threatened Terminal 6 by I.M. Pei, Hayes said Terminal 3 is "superior to Pei, especially in terms of aviation architecture. Pei's is a pretty corporate box, but it could be anywhere." Terminal 3, however, had an unparalleled design that allowed for passenger loading and maintenance to take place all under its unique canopy. "This is really the place that established the paradigm for airport architecture, and these terminals were treated like international headquarters, intended to be corporate icons," Hayes said of JFK. Hayes said the biggest problem is that Terminal 3 "suffers from a no-name architect," otherwise it might have a better shot at preservation—something he insists would be far easier than the Port Authority, Delta, or even some preservationists will allow. He proposes demolishing the '70s addition, running the connector Delta is planning between terminals 2 and 4 through the old Terminal 3, and turning it into a grand mall of some sort, with the shops and eateries that are now familiar to any airport. As for the Port Authority's insistence that there is no room for even remnants of the building, Hayes disagrees. "They can leave it pretty much where it is and not impact the new terminals or the parking one iota," Hayes said. He should know, as this is precisely what his previous plans called for. UPDATE: It was just announced that AECOM has won the $11 million contract to oversee construction on the terminal project. Is there anything they can do? UPDATE 2: Hal Hayes writes: "There is a misquote about Saarinen’s Terminal 5, which I said was functionally groundbreaking and one of the terminals that created the paradigm for modern aviation terminal design, along with Terminal 3 and other early JFK Terminals. It was Terminal 6 that I said was not functionally innovative."