Posts tagged with "deindustrialization":

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A High Line in Pittsburgh? Officials bet big on elevated park in Steel City

Move over, New York. Earlier this month, developers McKnight Realty Partners held a ceremonial groundbreaking for the Highline, Pittsburgh’s newest mega-conversion. Developer McKnight Realty teamed up with local firm Indovina Associates Architects to redevelop the Pittsburgh Terminal Warehouse and Transfer Company (map) on the city’s deindustrialized South Shore. The $110 million complex will bring 600,000 square feet of office and retail to the area. The building—they are one, but appear to be two—is connected by a five-hundred-foot-long elevated roadway that will be converted into a park-like space with lighting and seating. The walkway will be extended to the abutting Monongahela River and face north towards the city’s Downtown. Similar in name and form to Manhattan’s High Line, which brought a disused freight railway line back to life as a public park and spurred a development boom on Manhattan’s Far West Side, Pittsburgh's Highline project seeks to revitalize a significant site within the city's post-industrial landscape. Indovina’s design incorporates vegetative and hardscaping features, such as raised planters and textured concrete pavers. Below the Highline, and along the facility’s loading docks, there will be a lower park dubbed the Yards which will serve as an extension to Pittsburgh’s preexisting river trail system. Restoration is key to the project. Notably, all of the complex’s damaged windows will be replaced with historically accurate units and both the cast-iron detailing and brick curtain walls will be entirely restored. Completed in 1906, The Terminal Building was designed by prominent Pittsburgh architect Charles Bickel. Like the former warehouses adjacent to Manhattan’s High Line, the facility was designed to integrate freight and warehousing logistics in an urban setting. The conversion of The Terminal Building joins Pittsburgh’s ongoing restoration and construction trend that has brought similar warehouses back to life, such as the city’s Produce Terminal and the Allegheny Riverfront Green Boulevard. The Pittsburgh Tribune reported the project will receive approximately $17.5 million in federal and state financial incentives, and construction should be complete by 2019.
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Sustainable development plan for Northeast Ohio takes top honors in 2015 National Planning Awards

A plan to steer northeast Ohio toward sustainable growth won a top planning award this week, joining schemes and firms from Austin to Los Angeles on a list of the year's best urban planning work. The American Planning Association on Tuesday awarded its 2015 National Planning Awards, naming 17 firms, plans, and individuals worthy of an “excellence award,” and another 12 to their list of “achievement” award winners. View the full list on this page below, or on the APA's website. The Northeast Ohio Sustainable Communities Consortium took home the top prize for Vibrant NEO 2040—a plan to “do things differently” in the region, which has exemplified the planning perils of deindustrialization, depopulation and the cascading after-effects of those broader trends on a local level. Vibrant NEO is the first regional plan ever implemented in northeast Ohio, which comprises five planning groups across Cleveland, Akron, Canton, and Youngstown. image07

2015 National Planning Excellence Recipients

Daniel Burnham Award for a Comprehensive Plan
  • Vibrant NEO 2040 – Northeast Ohio
The HUD Secretary’s Opportunity & Empowerment Award
  • Mueller Redevelopment – Austin, Texas
National Planning Excellence Award for a Best Practice
  • First Last Mile Strategic Plan & Planning Guidelines – Los Angeles, California
National Planning Excellence Award for Public Outreach
  • Making Planning Public: Newark Zoning Workshop – Newark, New Jersey
National Planning Excellence Award for Implementation
  • Green City, Clean Waters: Philadelphia’s 21st Century Green Stormwater Infrastructure Program – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
National Planning Excellence Award for a Communications Initiative
  • Boston Complete Streets Design Guidelines – Boston, Massachusetts
National Planning Excellence Award for Transportation Planning
  • moveDC – Washington, D.C.
National Planning Excellence Award for Environmental Planning
  • Greater New Orleans Urban Water Plan – Louisiana
National Planning Excellence Award for Economic Planning & Development
  • Phase 1 Glenwood Refinement Plan – Springfield, Oregon
National Planning Excellence Award for Urban Design
  • The BIG U – New York, New York
The Pierre L’Enfant International Planning Excellence Award
  • Tecnológico de Monterrey Urban Regeneration Plan – Monterrey, Mexico
National Planning Excellence Award for a Planning Advocate
  • Honorable Greg Cox – San Diego, California
National Planning Excellence Award for a Planning Agency
  • Maryland Department of Planning – Baltimore, Maryland
National Planning Excellence Award for an Emerging Planning & Design Firm
  • Raimi + Associates – California
National Planning Excellence Award for Advancing Diversity & Social Change (in Honor of Paul Davidoff)
  • State Representative Harold Mitchell, Jr. and the ReGenesis Project – Spartanburg, South Carolina
National Planning Excellence Award for a Planning Pioneer
  • Donald Shoup, FAICP, PhD – Los Angeles, California
National Planning Excellence Award for a Planning Firm
  • Perkins+Will — San Francisco, California

2015 National Planning Achievement Recipients

The Achievement Awards are a way for the awards jury to recognize good planning work and are similar to an honorable mention. National Planning Achievement Award for a Best Practice
  • Realizing the Potential of The Porch: A Case Study in Data-Driven Placemaking – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
National Planning Achievement Award for Economic Planning & Development
  • Maryland State Arts Council – Arts & Entertainment Districts Program – Baltimore, Maryland
National Planning Achievement Award for Environmental Planning
  • Living Breakwaters – New York, New York
Lake Tahoe Sustainability Action Plan – California and Nevada National Planning Achievement Award for Implementation
  • Branch Brook Park – Newark, New Jersey
National Planning Achievement Award for a Grassroots Initiative
  • Opa-locka Community Development Corporation/Gold Coast Section Pop-Up Park Initiative – Miami-Dade County, Florida
National Planning Achievement Award for Public Outreach
  • Pop-Up Outreach for the Southeastern San Diego and Encanto Neighborhoods Community Plans – San Diego, California
National Planning Achievement Award for Transportation Planning
  • WalkBikeNC – North Carolina
National Planning Achievement Award for Urban Design
  • Tongva Park & Ken Genser Square – Santa Monica, California
  • Greening Lower Grand Avenue – Phoenix, Arizona
The Pierre L’Enfant International Planning Achievement Award
  • West End Community Plan – Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • Les Isles/ Domtar Lands Redevelopment – Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
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“City Works” envisions Chicago’s “dreams and nightmares”

From the abandoned foundations of the ill-fated Chicago Spire to the ghosts of would-be Tribune Towers galore, Chicago’s unbuilt legacy could rival the iconic skyline it actually achieved. An exhibition on display downtown, dubbed City Works: Provocations for Chicago’s Urban Future, confronts the city with its alternative skyline in the form of a panoramic wall design and a “Phantom Chicago” iPhone app. The overall effect evokes “a dream but also a nightmare,” in the words of curator Alexander Eisenschmidt. It also presents “a series of urban environments that are typical for Chicago,” meditating through the work of four prominent local designers on some of the city’s contemporary challenges: waterways, industry, shelter, and vacancy. To borrow Eisenschmidt’s metaphor, the aim is to turn potential nightmares into visionary dreams. Studio Gang’s work on urban waterways is well-known and their work here, titled “Reclaiming the Edge,” reprises the vision they laid out in Reverse Effect and other publications: a riverfront community and restored natural habitat nourish each other in a kind of urban symbiosis. After years of legal wrangling, Chicago’s Water Reclamation District will soon disinfect the wastewater it dumps back into the river, signaling some substantive progress on water quality. Meanwhile the Chicago Riverwalk grows along the waterway's main branch. UrbanLab / Sarah Dunn & Martin Felsen present “Free Water District,” a vision that also draws on Chicago’s aquatic resources. Rust Belt cities share many challenges stemming from deindustrialization, but they also share a common asset: water. UrbanLab’s piece envisions a Great Lakes region revitalized by water-focused industries, in a “megastructure-scaled public/private land/water partnership.” Stanley Tigerman offers a rumination on shelter in both the spatial and spiritual sense with “Displacement of the Gridiron with the Cloister.” His target is the “ineffable in architecture,” which is philosophical enough to mean many things to many people who might have very different ideas of the city’s urban aspirations. “The Available City” by David Brown displays a similar yearning, manifesting the city’s 15,000 city-owned vacant lots as blots of color bubbling up amid fractured neighborhoods. The bright colors, which appear to denote potential programs for unused space, could mean anything — adaptive reuse, public space, space-age capsule hotel — but the important thing is they reanimate dead spaces that total an area twice the size of the Loop. All four panoramas will eventually connect, sharing continuous topographic or development features. But until the closing days of the show they remain separate, traveling slowly along dotted lines that traverse the small exhibition space. “By pulling them apart,” Eisenschmidt said, “there’s a little suspense.” City Works, adapted from the 2013 Biennale in Venice, returned to its city of origin May 24. And these “provocations” are not Eisenschmidt’s first. In 2011 the University of Illinois at Chicago professor’s Visionary Chicago (reviewed here for A|N by Philip Berger) stirred conversation about bold building while the real estate market languished. The free show is open at Expo 72, 72 E. Randolph St., seven days per week through September 29. Listen to a conference on the topic, held September 22, 2012 and recorded by WBEZ. Watch 50 meters of the "Phantom Chicago" wall panorama scroll by: