Posts tagged with "death":

What is the future of death? A gallery solicits design responses

Art Omi, an arts nonprofit based in upstate New York, has issued an open call for an upcoming exhibition that will explore the future of design for death. Exit Architecture: Speculations on the Hereafter will showcase proposals that present critical and speculative looks at both present and future visions of post-mortem architecture and “new ways of marking our exit” from this world. Organized by Warren James, Julia van den Hout, and Kyle May, it’s the first curated exhibition put together by Art Omi’s architecture program. Art Omi facilitates projects for architects that integrate experimental and innovative landscape, architecture, and art ideas. According to a press release, the purpose behind Exit Architecture is to uncover designs that go beyond traditional memorials and religious symbolism, and ones that react to the changing landscape of modern life on Earth.   As the curators note: “The realities of the world today have imposed additional restrictions and opportunities on internment: rapid population growth, densifying urban areas, limited space, environmental concerns, and digitization—all factors that could lead architects to reimagine our own exit.” The chosen works will be on view at Art Omi’s campus in upstate New York at the Newmark Gallery in the Benenson Center from January 12 to March 3, 2019. It will then begin touring on March 15. Architects and architectural teams from any part of the world are invited to propose an idea for the exhibition. See submission guidelines here.

GSAPP’s DeathLAB examines evolving attitudes towards mortality

The SANAA-designed 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art at Kanazawa, Japan, is hosting the exhibition DeathLAB: Democratizing Death, featuring works by the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP)-based, transdisciplinary lab, led by associate professor of architecture Karla Rothstein. The exhibition is free and runs through March 24, 2019. The exhibition covers DeathLAB's architectural and artistic proposals that address the changing nature of spaces of death in contemporary society, a topic with particular relevance to Japan. The Japanese urban landscape is stressed by over-population, declining birthrates, and an aging population. Due to a shortage of space, people have begun seeking affordable space-saving burial measures. For example, in Tokyo, CNN reported on the Ruriden, a repository of LED-lit Buddha statues, and Shinjuku Rurikoin Byakurengedo, a futuristic temple designed by Kiyoshi Sey Takeyama of Amorphe. It contains a “smart library for ashes” that transports people using a conveyor belt system to underground urns. Alternative practices such as online funerals are also on the rise. The exhibition showcases DeathLAB’s ongoing work in this area through a three-part film and architectural models. The films feature interviews with experts in areas ranging from philosophy to historic preservation.
An illuminated model of Constellation Park, a 2014 unbuilt project, has been assembled for the show. According to a statement by the museum’s curator, Yoshiko Takahashi, “the project proposed nesting thousands of light-emitting ‘memorial vessels’ underneath New Yorkʼs iconic Manhattan Bridge. Harnessing the human bodyʼs latent bio-energy, the memorial vessels would be populated with calibrated microbial colonies to gradually decompose corpses over the course of a year, generating methane that would, in turn, be used to illuminate the vessel network in a dazzling constellation of mourning lights.” The lab believes that death transcends differences of “ethnicity, religion, and political/economic constraints." Constellation Park is meant to be an example of how death can be “democratized” in the metropolis. The project reinterprets the process of biodegradation present in natural burials. It is inspired by the 1960s Japanese Metabolist movement that was enamored with the relationship between organic biological growth and architecture. Check out this link for more details.

Architect falls to his death from Midtown tower

Architect Bruno Travalja, of Ridgewood, New Jersey, died on Thursday afternoon after falling from the 48th floor of a Midtown Manhattan skyscraper at 6th Avenue and 52nd St. According to the New York Daily News, he bent down to take a measurement and got dizzy when he stood up. He was wearing a safety harness but it wasn't attached to anything, so the co-owner of Crowne Architectural Systems tumbled over the 18-inch security barrier. The Department of Buildings has launched an ongoing investigation. The residential tower was located at 135 52nd Street, between 7th and 6th Avenues.