Posts tagged with "David Burney":

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Pratt Institute’s May symposium will explore the relationship between theory and practice in modern placemaking

The Pratt Institute Graduate Center for Planning and the Environment is putting together a day of discussions this May 13 to dive deeper into the theory and practice of placemaking. This symposium, titled "Making Sense of Place: Place Theory and Placemaking in Practice," will focus on the intersections of academic theory and practical urban placemaking across four sessions led by current practitioners and theorists of place and placemaking, including:
  • Eve Baron, chairperson of Pratt's Center for Planning and the Environment Grad Center for Planning
  • David Burney, director of Pratt's Urban Placemaking and Management program
  • Tim Cresswell, dean of the faculty, vice president for academic affairs, and professor of American studies, Hartford, Connecticut's Trinity College
  • Setha Low, professor, The Graduate Center at the City University of New York
  • Sean Anderson, associate curator, Museum of Modern Art
  • Kim Dovey, professor of architecture & urban design, Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne
These speakers will ask the tough questions, exploring the potential of placemaking to relieve mistrust in the government, integrate displaced people into communities, help understand complex urban issues, and support under-served communities. The symposium will take place on May 13 at Higgins Hall Auditorium at Pratt University’s campus in Brooklyn. For more information about the event schedule and to purchase tickets for the event, you can visit the website here.
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New York promotes active design at the 2015 FitCity conference

Last month, AIA New York and the New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene held the tenth annual FitCity conference. The event, which hosted a multi-disciplinary group of nearly 500 participants ranging from architects and designers to policymakers and public health officials, explored some of the approaches and strategies that could be implemented to create a more healthful and “fit” New York City. “FitCity is not just a conference. It’s a movement,” David Burney, chair of the Center for Active Design, said in a statement. Indeed, the active design movement, which is championed by FitCity, has gained considerable traction both in New York City and across the globe over the past ten years. The Center’s Active Design Guidelines, published in 2010, have created a new standard for the design and construction of the built environment, emphasizing accessibility to physical activity and fresh foods. As a result, the movement has produced healthier buildings, public spaces, and neighborhoods. The conference featured keynote addresses by Daniel Hernandez, Deputy Commissioner for Neighborhood Strategies at the NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development, and Mindy Thompson Fullilove, MD, Professor of Clinical Studies and Sociomedical Sciences at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. The “FitCity 10 Report”, which can be viewed on AIANY’s website, provides an overview of the 2015 conference, as well as a vision for the future. “Design influences our environment, and we influence design,” stated Sonia Angell, MD, the Deputy Commissioner of the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Division for Prevention and Primary Care. “FitCity is an opportunity to transform the environment for health.”
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Former director of AIANY Rick Bell to join New York City’s Department of Design & Construction

After his sudden departure from his post as executive director of the AIA New York and the Center for Architecture in late March, Rick Bell is joining the city's Department of Design and Construction (DDC), according to a recent report by Crains. Bell, who helmed the two organizations for over a decade, will return to the public sector where he previously served as the chief architect and assistant commissioner at the DDC. His position at the agency has yet to be revealed. In a strange turn of events, à la musical chairs, David Burney, who is an associate professor of planning at Pratt Institute's School of Architecture, stepped into Bell's former role as the interim executive director in April after leading the DDC as commissioner from 2004 until 2014.
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Pratt Professor David Burney named interim executive director at the AIANY

The AIA and Center for Architecture has just named David Burney former commissioner of New York City’s Department of Design & Construction and currently Pratt Institute professor as interim executive director of the AIA New York replacing Rick Bell. The AIA and its current President Tomas Rossant issued the following statement:
David Burney’s vast experience leading City agencies and his legacy of improving the quality of public projects in New York will be an invaluable asset to AIANY as we work with the current administration on issues concerning creating affordable housing and reducing carbon emissions, among others. David is a tremendous design professional and we’re excited to have him onboard in this capacity.
The release also included a statement from the departed Rick Bell:
The fourteen years at AIANY have been a wonderful part of my life, but it is now time to move on to undertake new opportunities. I am proud to have helped create the Center for Architecture which has grown into a meeting place and community center for all in the design professions, and which brings in architectural enthusiasts from around the world. I express my thanks and admiration for all of the hardworking staff and for the inspirational boards both past and present who have allowed me the privilege of being at this remarkable place.
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Late Summer Signings at Pratt Mark Beginning of Academic School Year

It's the end of summer and again time for architecture students and faculty to return to studios and classrooms all over the country. There are several new high profile architecture Deans facing their first week of dealing with academic regulations, nervous students, and lack of classroom space. In addition young new faculty are preparing for their first lectures and several well known senior faculty have transferred institutions. Pratt Institute for example, has just announced two high profile additions to its faculty. Pratt announced two high profile "signings" that are big news for the design institute. First, David Burney, former Commissioner of the City’s Design and Construction agency,will become a full time member of the faculty, but, more importantly, will became the first coordinator of a new design program called Urban Placemaking and Management. It will become the first in the nation, focusing, Pratt claims, on "public space creation and management based on  community planning." Pratt also announced that theorist Sanford Kwinter will join the institute as a Professor of Science and Design in the School of Architecture this fall. Kwinter is co-founder and editor of the influential journal, ZONE, and Zone Books for 20 years. Trained in philosophy and literature, he has written extensively on philosophical issues of design, architecture, and urbanism, as well as art and aesthetics. In addition to continuing his research and writing, Professor Kwinter will teach seminars and lecture courses in the graduate and undergraduate architecture programs. Architecture Dean Thomas Hanrahan states, “Professor Kwinter is one of the world’s most important voices in architecture today because of his broad, interdisciplinary interests in art and science as they apply to design.”  Kwinter most recently co-directed the Masters in Design Studies programs at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. He wrote that  Pratt's "historical and urban context allows for a broad engagement with local social and political conditions as well as with the wider discipline of architecture as it relates to game-changing practices at a truly cosmopolitan scale. I am, as a theorist, greatly looking forward to coming to Pratt.”
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NYC Department of Design and Construction Launches Program to Support Local Designers

Last May New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn announced a new initiative, NYC X Design, to promote New York's design community, an economic sector that includes more than 40,000 designers of various disciplines, according to official figures. As an outgrowth of NYC X Design, today the Department of Design and Construction (DDC) launched a new pilot project called Built/NYC, which provides $400,000 in capital funding for custom furniture, lighting, or textile designs in up to 20 city building projects. Council Speaker Quinn's office provided the funding for the project, and at a press conference today held at the NoHo design store, The Future Perfect, Speaker Quinn argued that the initiative would support both local designers and local manufacturers and help maintain a diverse economy. Interested designers can respond to an new RFQ, which would place them on a pre-qualified list to be considered for custom pieces for projects like new libraries, community centers, or fire houses (architects for the building projects sit on the selection committee).  According to Victoria Milne, Director of creative services for DDC, designers will retain copyright to the designs, allowing them to potentially sell their objects to other municipalities or to bring them to market through a manufacturer. Industrial and interior designer Harry Allen praised the program for giving opportunities to local designers. He said that New York is "an amazing creative city, but also a hard city." Built/NYC will serve as a new way for industrial, lighting, and textile designers to break into public work. Quinn demonstrated her love of design by complimenting Allen on his slip-on Converse Jack Purcell shoes and she gushed about the wares on display at the The Future Perfect. She warned the assembled reporters to be careful in the store. "If you break it, you buy it," she joked.
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Snohetta Takes Broadway with Times Square Repairs

While it was nearly hot enough to fry in egg in Times Square Tuesday, things have since cooled off a bit, and not simply because the temperature dropped back into double digits. Today the city's Department of Transportation began installing in the public plazas Molly Dilworth's 18-month installation, "Cool Water, Hot Island," which will not only prettify the eight newish plazas with an abstracted heat map of the city but also reflect some sunlight, making for a more comfortable experience. Meanwhile, DOT along with the Department of Design and Construction announced that it had selected Nordic knockouts Snøhetta as the lead designer for the long-term transformation of the square. The selection of Snøhetta is not exactly a surprise, as it is one of the eight firms in the city's Design + Construction Excellence program, from which DOT had already said it would make its choice because it streamlines the design process as the firms are prequalified. Yet it was Snøhetta's experience outside the city that helped win it the commission. “It is a classic New York story that reconstruction of the ‘Crossroads of the World’ will be led by a firm with an international reputation for creative vision and excellence,” DDC commissioner David Burney said in a statement. Snøhetta's preference for public art, landscape design, and sustainability may have played a role in its winning the commission. Still, the nature of the project is rather new to the firm, most of its successes having come through buildings such as the Library of Alexandria and Oslo Opera House, though both are incredibly public in their nature, so Snøhetta should prove a good, and certainly interesting fit, as its work at Ground Zero has shown. Joining the Oslo- and New York-based firm on the design team are WXY Architecture and Design, Weidlinger Associates (engineers), Mathews Nielsen (landscape), Billings Jackson Design (industrial), and Bexel (audio-visual), all of whom are Excellence program participants. The design work is just beginning, with no time line or budget yet set for its unveiling, according to a DOT spokesperson, though the plan remains to begin construction in 2012. The firms will be responsible for improving the pedestrian experience in the plazas as well as the infrastructure for the various events held in Times Square throughout the year. "Our goal is to improve the quality and atmosphere of this historic site for pedestrians and bicyclists while also allowing for efficient transportation flow for the betterment of the city,” said Craig Dykers, head of Snohetta's New York office and its co-founder. And in more Molly Dilworth news, online art gallery Art We Love is selling a series of seven prints for 15 bucks a pop.
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Iron Designers Fight and Fundraise

What will tonight's secret ingredient be? Marshmallows? A T-square? Tea squares? To help raise funds for the Urban Assembly School of Design and Construction, a charter founded in 2004 to teach and promote architecture and design, the school is hosting the Iron Designer Challenge tonight. Like an ARCH DL for a good cause, teams of four professionals and two students will compete for the title of champion, as well as structural innovation, people's choice, and, of course, best use of the secret ingredient. Teams will start at 5:00, with three hours to finish their work, but there is also a party open to the public—this is a fundraiser, after all—from 6:00 to 8:30. Tickets are 50 dollars, but you get to mingle on the roofdeck with the likes of the jury, DDC commish David Burney, SHoP principal Gregg Pasquarelli, Cooper-Hewitt ed head Caroline Payson, and Parsons architecture dean Joel Towers. Plus, there's a damned impressive designy silent auction.