Posts tagged with "david adjaye architects":

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New renderings released for Adjaye Associates’ Florida library

 Last year, a small Florida city commissioned David Adjaye to design a new public library and venue. Now, Winter Park has released new renderings and schematic designs for the building, whose upside-down-lopped-off-pyramidal massing resembles the London architect's acclaimed design for the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C.

The new images are more detailed than the collaged ones that debuted last November. Here, the new, 50,000-square-foot facility is depicted with its cast concrete panel cladding that will be painted with a to-be-determined color (current renderings depict an ochre facade). Included in the footprint is a 8,500-square-foot civic center, as well as a parking garage for 200 vehicles. In the two-story library, a central spiral staircase will connect the two floors. At the events center, a spiral stair will connect the venue with the rooftop cafe.

Adjaye's firm, Adjaye Associates, is collaborating with Florida's HuntonBrady Architects on the project, which will supplant Winter Park's civic center.

The library is slated to cost around $30 million, but features like a rooftop venue over the events center could be included if fundraising efforts are a success, the Los Angeles Times reported.

The city is hoping to okay the move to design development at its meeting next week.

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David Adjaye has L.A. projects in the pipeline

This post is part of our years-long running Eavesdrop series (think page 6 for the architectural field). It’s your best source for gossip, insider stories, and more. Have an eavesdrop of your own? Send it to: eavesdrop[at]archpaper.com.

Does David Adjaye, lead designer behind the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. have Los Angeles–based projects in the pipeline?

Yes, according to the architect himself. During a recent interview at the Dwell on Design conference with Los Angeles Times architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne, Adjaye teased that his office had several potential L.A. projects on the way—up to half a dozen of them, in fact.

The architect could not elaborate further, but he hinted the projects might be diverse in their programming and occupy sites scattered across the city.

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Early conceptual studies revealed for David Adjaye tower in Manhattan

[Update 5/25/2017: After this article went to press Adjaye Associates submitted the following statement to AN: "These images only reflect early conceptual studies of the building. We remain in the process of refining and evolving the design, with imagery adjusting accordingly. We look forward to sharing final renderings in the coming months." This article's title was updated accordingly.) Early conceptual studies have surfaced for architect David Adjaye's latest project, a condominium tower in Manhattan's Financial District. The developer, Lightstone Group, is seeking funding for the 800-foot-tall tower, which is set to rise at 130 William Street. The group tapped Adjaye's London firm, Adjaye Associates, to design the 60-story, 228-unit structure, which—though it's about five blocks north of its namesake row—will be called the Wall Street Tower. In the leading study, the building's arched gold windows rise almost to the same height of SOM's One World Trade, which is tucked coyly into the background. The Real Deal reports that construction on the approximately $700 million project is expected to wrap in November 2019. Though Adjaye is best known stateside for his National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., the London architect has designed affordable housing in Sugar Hill for the Broadway Housing Communities and the Studio Museum in Harlem. Recently, his firm was tapped to design a public library in an Orlando, Florida suburb and master-plan a major waterfront development in San Francisco. Lightstone's teaser site for the project says that prices will start at $630,000 for a studio and go up to $4.7 million for a four-bedroom. Marketing materials show residents cavorting around an indoor pool and spa, a wine cellar, gym, movie theater, and rooftop observatory, among other amenities. All images via 6sqft.
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David Adjaye given the go-ahead for mixed-use Piccadilly project in London

After beating Jean Nouvel, OMA and Frank Gehry to commission, David Adjaye Architects have been granted planning permission for its residential, hotel and retail development in Mayfair, London which will sit opposite the Ritz Hotel. Rising ten floors high, Adjaye's design for developer Crosstree Real Estate Partners will house street level retail while embedding a luxury hotel into the first and second floors. The rest of the building will be used for residential space and high-end condos. The 119,900 square foot complex brings natural light into the lower interior floors via the use of a large circular void. Meanwhile the external curved and "textured" facade makes use of Portland stone cladding and glazing to offer a "contextually sympathetic design", described David Adjaye Architects, that "draws on the shapes, forms and textures of the neighboring historic buildings." The building's proportionality and roofline emulate its counterparts on the street, including the Royal Academy and Burlington Arcade. "Referencing the classical arrangement of these iconic buildings, the facades of the new development are separated into three distinct sections with a central focal point" the architectural firm said in a statement on the project. The development has also made vast improvements to the Dover Yard and has integrated it into the site so that it acts as a pedestrianized throughway and public plaza. The feature is intended to be an "urban retreat at the heart of the development." "The treatment plays with the traditional sculpted silhouette of binary planes that curve, straighten and invert in a rhythmic sequence – reinterpreting and rearranging the traditional sequence to create a shifting plane of scalloped edges."