Posts tagged with "Danish":

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C. F. Møller Architects wraps glass house in a seemingly weightless pre-fab concrete screen

"The eye-catching screen reflects the innovation and creativity that characterizes the various institutes which it unites."

The University of Southern Denmark has a new, shared research and education facility by C. F. Møller Architects that combines four academic research institutes into one shared academic research facility. The various groups are connected by a central canyon-like social space with bridges that span the atrium overhead, linking the institutes. The organization of the building is primarily influenced by SDU’s 1970’s era structuralist campus design by architects Krohn & Hartvig Rasmussen that incorporated reinforced concrete construction and cor-ten steel in a linear site layout. The building envelope is predominantly a glass curtainwall with a custom exterior concrete screen made from pre-fab panels of white CRC concrete (Compact Reinforced Composite, a special type of Fiber Reinforced High Performance Concrete with high strength) featuring circular openings with an underlying solar screen and natural ventilation.  
  • Facade Manufacturer HiCon (CRC panels); HS Hansen (window units)
  • Architects C. F. Møller Architects
  • Facade Installer HS Hansen
  • Location Odense, Denmark
  • Date of Completion 2015
  • System compact reinforced panels on steel frame
  • Products "Hansen Fasad" windows from HS Hansen, custom fiber-reinforced high performance concrete screen
The architects say that the composition of the screen avoids a dull repetitive patterning, yet manages to save costs due to a modular assembly comprised of only 7 unique cast profiles. Data from key views, solar shading, and structural requirements provide parameters to control circular opening sizes (from 4 inches to 6 feet in diameter) and locations with respect to interior functions. Structural integrity of the panel connection points added further challenges to the design of the custom screen. Julian Weyer, partner at C. F. Møller, says a collaboration between the fabricator and installer simplified the process: “mockups were used to qualify the design process and especially the design possibilities and constraints of the concrete screen.” The circular patterning of the CRC screen extends onto the roof where variously sized circular skylights bring daylight into the central atrium. This establishes one of the most successful spaces in the building. “The experience of the day lit ‘canyons’ inside and between the labs feels both intimate and spacious,” Weyer says. The building meets the strict Danish building code requirements for low-energy class 2015, which addresses various environmental criteria including minimal energy consumption, good indoor climate and use of materials with a low environmental impact in a life cycle perspective. While the project was designed roughly at the same time as Henning Larsen Architects’ Kolding Campus, a mere 7-minute walk away, the two SDU projects were not directly influential on each other, however Weyer says both contribute to “an already solid Danish tradition for open ‘learning landscapes’ and innovative educational buildings” citing prior C. F. Møller projects such as the Maersk Building in Copenhagen, the A.P. Møller School in Schleswig and the Vitus Bering Innovation Park in Horsens as notable precursors.
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Product> Grethe Sørensen for Wolf-Gordon Textiles and Wallcoverings

This March, Wolf-Gordon will launch a collection of upholstery and wallcoverings featuring the designs of Danish textile designer Grethe Sørensen. The offerings highlight the artist’s ground-breaking technique of translating pixels to threads, most recently displayed in her exhibition Rush Hour/Shanghai 5 at Fuori Salone in Milan. Sørensen’s work often features variations of light and color found in night settings and urban landscapes, which she manipulates in Photoshop before translating on to fabric. Cooper-Hewitt plans to acquire her work once its new building opens in late 2014. Sørensen's line for Wolf-Gordon was created by taking unfocused photographs of urban lights which she then manipulated in photoshop. “It’s more about the colors and the shapes,” she told AN. The collection is Sørensen’s introduction to the U.S. market and is being produced at a Wolf-Gordon partner-mill in North Carolina. Despite it’s name, Millions of Colors is composed of just six weft colors—red, yellow, green, blue, cyan, and magenta—but endless arrangements support broad variations within three colorways. Black and white is also available.  All color options are composed of 94 percent worsted wool and 6 percent nylon. Three patterns were designed for wallcoverings. Soft Spots and Blinds are both digitally developed for vinyl. Codes is a pixelated pattern, available in half a dozen neutral colors. Wolf-Gordon will make HPDs available for Sørensen’s new collection as the company moves toward greater transparency with all its product offerings.