Posts tagged with "Daniel Arsham":

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(Almost) everything is blue in Snarkitecture co-founder Daniel Arsham’s latest installation

Daniel Arsham is feeling blue. Hourglass, the latest exhibition by the New York–based artist and Snarkitecture co-founder, is currently on display at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta. Hourglass features some of the Arsham’s first work in color. The colorblind artist has worked predominantly in black and white throughout his career but recently began using special light refracting glasses, which allow him to see the world more vibrantly. “Life is definitely more nuanced, but I’m not sure it’s more interesting. I feel like I’m inside a game—an overly saturated world,” said Arsham in a press release. “But now I’ve arrived at a point where I’m using color as another tool in my work. This is a unique project for me in that there is a ton of color, so I think it’s going to be really interesting to see audiences react.” The exhibition at the High features three installations, including a blue Zen garden and tea house that dominates one of the museum’s interior galleries. The monochromatic space is washed in a hurts-your-eyes blue: blue Japanese tea house, blue floor, blue sand. A gray petrified tree and gray stone lantern stand in the garden, providing the eyes with a break from the overwhelming color. Inside the tea house, a cast figure of a woman and a camera sit on the, you guessed it, blue tatami mats. The “scattered objects give the environment a palpable sense of dwelling—as if occupied by a caretaker hermit,” said the museum in a press release. That caretaker hermit, a member of the Atlanta glo dance company, comes along each Sunday during the exhibition to rake new patterns into the sand. The other installations include a cave of purple amethyst-cast sports equipment and a room of hourglasses that draw on Arsham’s continuing project, Fictional Archaeology, which involves the casting of everyday objects in precious and semi-precious stones. Hourglass is on view at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta through May 21.
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Snarkitecture created this ethereal light-filled cave to calm visitors at Milan Design Week

No, you haven't stepped inside a dream world made of suspended toilet paper tissues. You are, however, inside an ethereal installation crafted by New York–based design studio Snarkitecture and created for the 2015 Salone del Mobile taking place this week in Milan. https://youtu.be/obi38URay-M Principles Daniel Arsham and Alex Mustonen crafted this light-filled, monochromatic "cave" for minimalist fashion brand, COS, collaborating with the brand's in-house creative team. The designers were going for an aesthetic of clean lines and ambiguous spaces, and we'd say they achieved those goals. The subtly swaying gradients created by light filtering through strips of fabric create an incredibly peaceful environment appropriate for clearing one's head after a hectic day at Salone. COS' creative team, headed by Karin Gustafsson and Martin Andersson, chose Snarkitecture for their design approach to "reduction," and the architects' work even influenced COS' Spring and Summer collections. The brand was sympathetic to what Snarkitecture described as "removing anything non-essential and focusing the viewer's experience." And in creating this ethereal cave of light, not even a blouse or pair of trousers can be found on display in the space. "Without the use of our garments, Snarkitecture have perfectly encapsulated the COS aesthetic, creating an installation that is unique in its simplicity and unexpected in its approach," Gustafsson said in a statement. "The final space has a sense of calmness and wonder that we hope visitors will explore and return to," Arsham and Mustonen said in a statement. "The undulating spaces and the shifting quality of light seem to create a different experience with each visit." And while these views show the space in isolated tranquility, the flurry of visitors through the strips will reveal glimpses and continuously change the experience of the cave. The installation is on view at Spazio Erbe in the Brera district through April 19—or for those of us without a press pass to Milan, here in video and photographic form.
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On View> Daniel Arsham takes over Cincinnati’s Contemporary Arts Center

Remember the Future: Daniel Arsham Contemporary Arts Center 44 East 6th Street Cincinnati, OH March 20–August 30 Remember the Future is the first major exhibition in Ohio by Cleveland-born artist Daniel Arsham. In it, site-specific installations respond to the scale, light, and structure of the Contemporary Arts Center building in Cincinnati. Known for “making architecture do all the things it shouldn’t,” Arsham’s work marries theater, classicism, and hallucination by liquefying gallery walls, furniture, and the human form. Eerie, cloth-covered figures ripple from the walls as if trying to entice the viewer to another world on the far side, while elsewhere Arsham makes the walls appear to be in the process of melting. The artist’s recent work has involved casting outdated media devices—cameras, film projectors, and microphones—in geological material such as volcanic ash, crystal, and crushed glass.

Video> Gorlin, Arsham, and Pharrell on Art and Architecture

Pharrell Williams recently sat down to interview architect Alexander Gorlin and artist/designer Daniel Arsham of Snarkitecture. They discussed their influences and creative processes. The conversation took place in Gorlin's apartment in his eponymous building in Miami. As Pharrell noted, "We're sitting in your idea right now... That's deep."