Posts tagged with "Cultural Landscape Foundation":

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Landscape Takes Center Stage

Why doesn't landscape architecture in Southern California get the same attention as architecture? That's one of the questions that will be answered at Friday's Landscapes for Living conference at SCI-Arc. The event, organized by the Cultural Landscape Foundation, will focus on Post War Landscape designs in the region, which have largely stayed under the radar. For instance, who has heard of Ralph Cornell, who designed legendary landscapes like the Torrey Pines preserve near San Diego, Beverly Gardens in Beverly Hills and the Civic Center Mall and  Music Center plaza in Downtown LA ? Other subjects will include Ruth Shelhorn, the only female architect to work on the original plans for Disneyland, and designer of the park's entrance and Main Street; Bridges and Troller, who designed Century City; Lawrence Halprin, better known for his parks in the Pacific Northwest but also active in California; and of course the legendary (but under appreciated) Garret Eckbo.
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Beyond the Quotidian Landscape

The Cultural Landscape Foundation has just launched What's Out There,a database of landscapes with some sort of historical significance: parks big and small, and various important modern landscapes. Because these public spaces are often part of our quotidian routines, it's easy to be completely oblivious to the designer or how the space participates in the history of landscape design. Have a look at  "What's Out There"--a wonderful title that positively invites browsing--and learn more about what is just around the corner from where you are. A good place to start is in Advanced Search, where you can browse works by one particular landscape designer ("Pioneer"). Did you know that Isamu Noguchi designed a playground in Georgia? Or simply type "Park" into the search box and start browsing. As the last of the pioneering Modernist landscape designers leave us (like Lawrence Halprin, who died this last Sunday),  the launch of such a database feels particularly timely. Halprin and many other important designers are only represented by a handful of works in the database, but hopefully this is just a start for a most worthy enterprise.