Posts tagged with "Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art":

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Ten architecture shows to see in 2018

2018 is shaping up to be a solid year for striking and thought-provoking architecture exhibits. From Yugoslavian architecture to California design, here are ten shows not to miss: The Arsenal of Exclusion & Inclusion: New York Edition Center for Architecture 536 LaGuardia Place Through March 31 Curated and designed by Interboro Partners, The Arsenal of Exclusion & Inclusion: New York Edition presents 156 “weapons” used by political groups, developers, and community organizations to restrict or increase access to urban space. Inside the Walls: Architects Design Friedman Benda 515 West 26th Street Through February 17 This January, Friedman Benda gallery presents its annual guest-curated exhibition Inside the Walls: Architects Design, a survey spanning over a century that will encompass a broad range of architects from across the globe. The exhibit will feature the works of such architects as Philip Johnson, Frank Lloyd Wright, Mies van der Rohe and Luis Barragán, through the mediums of archival photographs and historical ephemera. Mark McDonald, a pre-eminent dealer of 20th-century modernist design, curated the sweeping exhibition. Arakawa and Madeline Gins: Eternal Gradient Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation 1172 Amsterdam Avenue March 30, 1:00 p.m. The opening of Arakawa and Madeline Gins: Eternal Gradient includes a half-day conference with speakers such as Adrienne Hart, Steven Holl, Momoyo Homma, Lucy Ives, Andrés Jaque, Thomas Kelley, Leopold Lambert, Carrie Norman, Spyros Papetros, Irene Sunwoo, and Miwako Tezuka. The exhibit features the work of the former artistic and architectural partnership between Madeline Arakawa Gins and Shusaku Arakawa. Copy + Paste: Hall of Architecture  Carnegie Museum of Art 4400 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh Through May 6 The Carnegie Museum of Art's Hall of Architecture possesses almost 150 facades, monuments, and architectural details sourced from across the world, which are predominantly cast and assembled in plaster. Copy + Paste explores this tradition of recreation through the investigation of augmented reality, 3-D printing, and potential robotic applications in the art of replication. The Open Workshop: New Investigations in Collective Form  Yerba Buena Center for the Arts 701 Mission Street, San Francisco March 9–July 15 Based in the Bay Area, The Open Workshop is an interdisciplinary design workshop focusing on urbanism, politics, and infrastructure. Featured as part of the Center’s The City Initiative, the group looks to create provocative and daring works within the urban environment. The Open Workshop founder Neeraj Bhatia is an architect and urban designer from Toronto and an assistant professor of architecture at the California College of the Arts. Designed in California San Francisco Museum of Modern Art 151 3rd Street, San Francisco Through May 27 Over the 20th century, California emerged as leader in design in both the United States and the world. Designed in California focuses on the output of design addressing socioeconomic and environmental awareness. The exhibit also examines the role of the digital revolution and the transformation of the consumer to digital user, one connected by the Internet of Things. Drawing Codes: Experimental Protocols of Architectural Representation University of Michigan Taubman College 2000 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan March 7–March 28 The use of innovative technologies in the realms of design and production has opened new avenues for architectural drawing and rendering. Through the use of 24 experimental drawings, Drawing Codes: Experimental Protocols of Architectural Representation examines the engagement between architectural drawing and design within the constraints of coding, be it zoning ordinances or technological scripts. The intended goal of the exhibit is to display the many approaches available for designers when confronted with a diversity of rules and restraints. Then, Now, Next: Evolution of an Architectural Icon Denver Art Museum 100 W 14th Avenue Parkway, Denver Through February 25 Architect Gio Ponti designed the Denver Art Museum and this exhibit traces the history of Ponti’s work featuring his historical photos, original architectural sketches, building models, and project renderings to tell the story of the North Building’s evolution. Not to Scale: Highlights from the Flys Eye Dome Archive Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art 600 Museum Way, Bentonville, Arkansas Through March 28 This exhibit features drawings, models, and concept sketches from the architect Buckminister Fuller during his work on the project Fly’s Eye Dome. Not to Scale: Highlights from the Fly’s Eye Dome Archive illuminates the work of Fuller and his collaborators, engineer John Warren and architect Norman Foster. Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948-1980 The Museum of Modern Art 11 W 53rd Street October 10, 2018–January 13, 2019 This exhibit will feature more than 400 drawings, photographs, models, and film reels from across the former Yugoslavia, depicting the unique Brutalist style that developed in that sprawling Balkan state. Toward a Concrete Utopia will be the first exhibit of its kind to focus on Brutalism across the Balkan peninsula.
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Buckminster Fuller’s 50-foot “Fly’s Eye” is coming to Crystal Bridges

This summer, a 50-foot-wide 61-eye version of Buckminster Fuller's Fly's Eye Dome will be moved to the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas. Known for his geodesic conceptions, Fuller designed the Fly’s Eye Dome in 1965 and produced three patented domes of different sizes by 1983. The 50-foot Monohex dome, made from glass and fiberglass, was the largest of the trio (the others spanned 12 feet and 24 feet in diameter by comparison) and was last exhibited at the Festival International d'Art in Toulouse, France, in 2013.
At the Crystal Bridges museum, the dome will sit on a lawn alongside a 1950s residence designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Here, the structure will be nestled among trees and greenery as part of a sculpture garden close to a new entrance the museum is constructing. Fuller based his design on the eye of a fly and had visions of the geodesic design transforming the way we approach housing. The idea though never took off and now remains as a symbol of the utopian approach to design that typified the era.
R. Buckminster Fuller, Fly’s Eye Dome, 1961, fabricated ca. 1980. Fiberglass-reinforced polyester 38 x 50 x 50 feet. (Courtesy of Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller)
"It is shocking and people are going to go, 'What is that?'" said Curatorial Assistant at Crystal Bridges, Dylan Turk speaking to the AP. "Hopefully they'll go out there and want to know what it is." The dome features 61 "oculi" that tessellate among the mostly triangular geodesic framework. "We have an actual piece of paper where he had a picture of a fly that he had found in a newspaper in the '60s," Turk continued. "He saw it and thought, 'The structure of this fly's eye could become one of my type of domes.' He was literally looking at a fly's eye." Turk added that Fuller "wanted to use the lightest materials possible because it costs the least to ship and uses less energy to build... Fiberglass is strong and cheap." The dome will be installed in the summer of 2017.
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Dale Chihuly and others to be featured at Crystal Bridges Museum in 2017

The Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Fayetteville, Arkansas, has announced its lineup for the 2017 season of exhibitions. Next year will see American photographer Richard Misrach and Mexican composer Guillermo Galindo's Border Cantos: Sight & Sound Explorations from the Mexican-American Border; American glass sculptor Dale Chihuly's In the Forest and In the Gallery, and American painter Stuart Davis's In Full Swing all exhibited at the museum. “Crystal Bridges roster of temporary exhibitions for 2017 celebrate a diverse group of artists and media. They offer visitors a variety of ways to embrace the American spirit in gallery and outdoor settings,” said Margi Conrads, Crystal Bridges Director of Curatorial Affairs. “Visitors can explore the complex issues surrounding the US-Mexican border; experience transformative glass installations in the museum and on our grounds; and enjoy more than 100 artworks from a preeminent figure in American Modernism.” Border Cantos: Sight & Sound Explorations from the Mexican-American Border Richard Misrach | Guillermo Galindo. February 18 to April 24, 2017. Free. 
Migration has an impact on both people and landscape. Presented in English and Spanish, Border Cantos, sheds light on the complexities of immigration and transforms these issues into resonant works of art, inviting us to bridge boundaries and initiate conversations. The artists created works of photography, sculpture, and sound that document and transform artifacts from the border. Misrach’s large-scale photographs, along with inventory-like grids of smaller photographs, highlight issues surrounding immigration and how they have affected regions and people. Responding to these photographs, Galindo fashioned sound-generating sculptures from items Misrach collected from the border, such as water bottles, Border Patrol “drag tires,” spent shotgun shells, ladders, and sections of the border wall itself.
Chihuly: In the Gallery and In the Forest June 3 to November 13, 2017. $10.00

Dale Chihuly, an American sculptor, has mastered the translucent and transparent qualities of ice, water, glass and neon, to create works of art that transform the everyday experience. He is globally renowned for his ambitious site-specific installations in public spaces, as well as exhibitions presented in museums and gardens. Crystal Bridges is pleased to present extensive indoor and outdoor installations, featuring new works by the artist, as well as iconic works spanning the breadth of his career.

Chihuly: In the Gallery will be on view in the museum’s temporary exhibition gallery from June 3 to August 14, 2017. Chihuly: In the Forest will be on view in the museum’s north forest from June 3 to November 13, 2017. A special members-only preview will take place May 27 – June 2, 2017. Ticket price: $20 In the Forest and In the Gallery; $10 In the Forest once the gallery portion closes. [Free for Members.]

Stuart Davis: In Full Swing September 16, 2017 to January 8, 2018. $8.00
This major retrospective will focus on three phases of Davis’s work: From 1927 to 1937, in which he applied the forms of Cubism to still-lifes and landscapes; from 1938 to 1943, during which his work increased in both size and abstraction; and from 1944 to Davis’s death in 1964, in which he invented a new abstract language that merged the aesthetics of advertising and jazz with language, and an American-inspired subject matter.
For more on the museum's exhibitions, visit their website here.
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Wheeler Kearns to design experimental art space for Crystal Bridges Museum

Bentonville, Arkansas will soon be home to a new art space designed by Chicago-based Wheeler Kearns Architects. The Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art has announced plans to convert a former Kraft cheese factory in Bentonville into new gallery space for unconventional programming. Like MoMA’s PS1 in Queens, New York, this venue will facilitate the showing of temporary, interactive, and performance art in a less formal setting. The museum’s permanent collection is currently displayed in a Moshe Safdie-designed building that bridges natural spring ponds in a forested setting. The museum grounds are also home to the Frank Lloyd Wright designed Bachman-Wilson House, which was moved from its original location along the Millstone River in New Jersey. The new exhibition space will take on a much different feel than the polished Safdie galleries. The former factory will be allowed to maintain much of its industrial character throughout its 63,000 square feet. The new space's downtown location will also distinguish it from the museum's more rural main campus. The biggest difference, however, will be the way in which art is displayed and created in the space. In addition to film screenings and performances of music and theatre, the former factory will host a new multi-disciplinary artists-in-residence program. As such, Wheeler Kearns plans to design the space to be flexibly-used. Crystal Bridges will also collaborate with the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA) to develop the programing for the space. The Walton Family Foundation, Wal-Mart's philanthropic group, was heavily involved in the creation of Crystal Bridges. Steuart and Tom Walton—grandsons of Walmart founder Sam Walton—are leading the foundation’s support the new space. Both have served on the museum's Board of Directors. The yet-to-be-named exhibition space is scheduled to be completed in 2018.
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How a Frank Lloyd Wright house built in New Jersey ended up in Arkansas

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Bachman Wilson House, built in 1956 in Millstone, New Jersey, opened to the public on November 11th in Bentonville, Arkansas. The house was disassembled on the original site and transported to the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, for preservation and public display. In 2013, when museum leaders visited the house, recent homeowners, Lawrence and Sharon Tarantino, proposed relocation. The Tarantinos’ land had been prone to flooding and therefore required numerous restorations to the home. To preserve the house properly, they knew relocation was necessary. The museum agreed, the structure was disassembled, and every component labeled. Two trucks transported the parts 1,235 miles to the Arkansas. The house is now situated near the museum’s south entrance, overlooking the woodlands and Crystal Spring. The reconstruction team also consisted of Scott Eccleston (Crystal Bridges’ Director of Operations), Ron Shelby (lead architect with Hight Jackson Associates), and Bill Faber (chief contractor with Bill Faber Construction). The team strove to reconstruct the house as close to the original as possible, reusing most of the mahogany, and recreating the concrete block walls and floors to Wright’s specifications. To further preserve the original structure, efficiencies were added to the re-construction. For example, a climate control system was installed to protect the mahogany, without having to change the interior floor design. Wright’s Bachman Wilson House is named after the original owners Abe and Gloria Wilson and Gloria’s brother Marvin Bachman, an apprentice to Wright. The house is an example of Wright’s middle-income family residences, in his “Usonian” period. Wright's Usonian Houses were normally small, single story, and consisted of native materials, flat roofs, and cantilevered overhangs–visually uniting the interior and exterior spaces. Tickets became available to the public on November 2nd, and, as of November 11th, the house became available to the public during Museum hours, for no cost. Because of the house’s limited space, tickets must be reserved in advance. Visitors have two options: General Admission, which is a self-guided tour, available each day except Tuesday, or Guided Tours, which are one-hour in length, offered any day except Tuesday or Friday. Regardless, anyone, with or without tickets can wander the surrounding grounds or hike the Crystal Springs and Tulip Tree Trails, which offer views of the house. Now that the Tarantino family, museum, and reconstruction team have successfully given Wright’s home a safe environment for preservation, generations to come can experience Wright's magnificent piece of work. For further information, or to reserve tickets, visit the Crystal Bridges' website.
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Marlon Blackwell Weaves Plywood At The Crystal Bridges Museum

Fabrikator

Marlon Blackwell uses ribbed ceiling to evoke craft while mitigating contemporary challenges at Arkansas museum.

The setting for the gift shop at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art seems idyllic—a vast glass wall opens onto a entry courtyard that gives way to a placid pond reflecting the Ozarks landscape. But to create a design for the 3,100 square-foot space in Bentonville, Arkansas, architect Marlon Blackwell had to overcome multiple hurdles. The first: a thicket of concrete columns supporting the green roof of the Moshe Safdie-designed building. Next: the west-facing glass wall, which made heat gain an issue. And finally: the very small budget (the total project cost was $644,000).
  • Fabricator UDI
  • Architect Marlon Blackwell Architect
  • Location Bentonville, Arkansas
  • Date of Completion  Late 2011
  • Material   Cherry plywood
  • Process  AlphaCAM CAD/CAM 3-D modeling, CNC routing
Blackwell’s solution to all three problems was a concept inspired in part by local Arkansas basket weaver Leon Niehues, whose work is now sold in the museum shop. Niehues’ pieces are distinguished by their vertical “ribs.” The wrapper of rib-like forms devised by Blackwell begins at the top of the exterior glass wall, where it acts as a sunscreen, and extends across the ceiling and down the long eastern interior wall where shelving is integrated into the system. Made of locally sourced cherry plywood, the final effect is less wicker-work and more chanterelle—Blackwell’s ribs, which span roughly 30 feet, evoke the gills on the underside of a mushroom cap. But the arc-shaped plan of the building complicated matters. “It was a curved volume, so we couldn’t reference a radius,” said Blackwell. “We used straight lines, which looks great but demanded that each rib had to be slightly different.” Each of the 223 undulating ribs is composed of up to four segments of joined planks 8 inches wide and 3/4-inches thick. Using 3-D modeling and AlphaCAM CAD/CAM software, Blackwell’s team translated the design to CNC routers in the millwork shop of Adam Weaver at UDI Inc, in Rogers, Arkansas. Weaver deployed two routers at once to stay on deadline—an Onsrud CNC and a Northwood CNC—and an optimizer insured that there was as little wasted material as possible. From 480 sheets of plywood emerged the 700 cut pieces for the ribs, each inscribed with a number and with the screw holes and the overlapping joins pre-cut. Once the material was delivered to the site, the contractors used a plum line and a laser to align then suspend components from the ceiling. The ribs gradually took shape one piece at a time. “It was like stacking stone,” said Blackwell, noting that everything snapped into place in under six weeks during construction in 2011. The rib system filters out up to 40 percent of the daylight and not only finesses the existing concrete columns but also conceals sprinklers and the store’s lighting system. Blackwell use of cherry planks for the floor creates a unified and warm space that complements the wares on display for only $200 per square foot.