Posts tagged with "Crosby Studios":

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Crosby Studios reveals limited-edition collection for Opening Ceremony

Harry Nuriev of Crosby Studios unveiled a whimsical, Dr. Seuss-eque collection of neon purple furniture for NYCxDESIGN. The maximal collaboration with the New York-based clothier, Opening Ceremony, includes interior wares and fashion items including lamps, garment racks, side tables, and accent chairs— as well as a set of brush-stroked vases and tote bags. AN spoke to the Moscow-born designer about his vibrant use of color, anatomical references (specifically the hand), his design process, and future aspirations. Architect’s Newspaper: What is the inspiration/idea behind the collection? How does that translate cohesively through apparel, ceramics, and, and the home good? Harry Nuriev: I was inspired by the idea of making furniture a part of your everyday wardrobe. Furniture can be equally as expressive as one's outfit, and I hope I achieved that with this collection. I wanted to make the collection cohesive through the use of figurative abstraction, abstract expressionist brushstrokes, and playful materials, forms, and colors. Another inspiration behind the collection: I've always been obsessed with Pedro Friedberg's hand chair. I think it's ingenious to support the body by a giant hand—it gives you a sense of security, as if some giant being is protecting you. The play in scale is also ridiculous, which is what inherently drew me to the chair. AN: How did the collaboration begin? What was the goal? HN: This is the first time I’ve worked with OC, but I’ve been a fan of the brand since its inception. It feels like a very organic collaboration that comes out of a place of mutual interest and respect. Once we met, everything was very seamless—so much so that our micro-home collection grew to encompass not only chairs, but bookshelves, ceramics, rugs, and even T-shirts, tote bags, and keychains. AN: What brands are you vying to work with in the future? HN: Rimova, Vipp, NARS, and Opening Ceremony one more time, but in their LA flagship. I'd also love to work on a Celine store, adding new ingredients while preserving the heritage of the brand and making Hedi Slimane happy at same time. AN: How do you plan your year? What is our product development process? HN: I’m about to make a new line of furniture—it's going to be really special and new for me. I'm hoping to complete a lot of projects over the summer, but my schedule is always in flux—I feel like I'm constantly traveling the world, and starting new collaborations each month! I'm also opening a pop-up gallery in New York in September, and hope to bring it to LA as well. Visiting Japan is definitely on the horizon. AN: What product do you wish you designed? HN: I'd love to work with more fashion brands, design movie sets, and even work with cosmetic brands... I really like the idea making the perfect nail polish and crazy lipstick with my own elusive palette. AN:  What are you working on now/next? HN: I'm working on a new collection of furniture and some nice commercial spaces in US and in Europe. I also have a collaboration with Liam Gillick for Sight Unseen OFFSITE's Field Studies series, on view May 17th! The limited edition pieces are sold at the Opening Ceremony Howard Street flagship store and available in  2-10 items per unit, ranging from $35-$230.
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At Collective Design, inflatable landscapes, spinning playgrounds, and other architectural highlights

AN’s editors toured the 6th edition of The Collective Design Fair at the Skylight Clarkson North this morning. At the fair known for its creative installations, we strolled through aisles of booths occupied by design-focused galleries and site-specific creations by local designers and museums. Several, highlighted below, walk that dazzling line between art, design, and architecture.   Natural Workshop by Jesse Seegers and Brook Landscape Tucked behind the show lies an ephemeral playground by Jesse Seegers surrounding a forested landscape by Brook Landscape. Seegers describes the process as “inflatable spaces I design, make the patterns for, cut out, and do physics simulations, digitally, to see what the finished design will look like.” The actualized forms are inflated by a constant stream of air that inflates three "breathing" plastic bellies. “I intentionally designed very simple forms,” explained Seegers. “This one is a standard tube, while the other two are tapered, which exaggerates the perspective.” VIP lounge by Leonidas Trampoukis and Eleni Petaloti of LOT office for architecture Though it is called the VIP lounge, founding partner of LOT and Objects of Common Interest, Leonidas Trampoukis, would describe the topography of glass blocks and slabs of acrylic his firm created as “more an installation.” Fashioned from translucent cuboids from Glass Block Warehouse Inc. and glossy umber-hued acrylic by Plaskolite, the purely decorative furnishings exude whimsical and textural vocabulary. My Reality by Crosby Studios Harry Nuriev, founder of Crosby Studios, is heavily influenced by growing up in Moscow. His Collective booth is lined by larger than life photos of his childhood apartment complex, a place he left at just 10 years old. While he practices primarily in New York City, the artist and architect draws inspiration from his formative years, in this case, the nostalgic memory of the traditional carousels of his younger years. Nuriev reinterpreted his childhood playground as a vibrant purple roundtable that spins in circles, a symbolic gesture to his formative years and inspiration. The Dream by Fernando Mastrangelo Inspired by Henri Rousseau’s painting The Dream, Fernando Mastrangelo created a sumptuous, curvilinear furniture landscape fashioned from sand molded with acrylic resin. Mastrangelo explains that the process to make wall tiles and other furniture, “as kind of like sand castle-style packing sand, only into a mold.” A surreal mountainous landscape surrounds the focal point of the space, a sand-cast sofa upholstered in oxblood cashmere, while the painting is visible through a nook in the wall, making the deep emeralds, reds, and oranges glow richly throughout the tableau.
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What to expect this year at Collective Design

This year, Collective Design returns to New York for its sixth edition, much earlier than previous years, relocating from the May NYCxDesign itinerary to Armory Arts Week. From March 9 through 11, a curated selection of design-focused galleries from around the world will occupy their booths with site-specific installations by local designers and museums. Here are five exhibitors showcasing for this year’s theme: the design process and study of objects.
  My Reality Crosby Studios Reminiscing on the traditional carousels of his childhood, Russian-born artist Harry Nuriev created an installation of four chairs that connect to a spinning table, like a carousel. The interactive is intentionally saturated in violet, a spectral color that occupies its own place at the end of the light spectrum.
The Qualia Collection Azadeh Shladovsky The Qualia Collection was named after the word’s definition; the internal or subjective component of perception that arises from stimulating the senses. Conceptual, yet empirical, the series explores the importance of touch in visual cognition. Each piece is represented by a letter from the braille alphabet, metaphorically denoting the palpable raised dots.
“Carré Rive Gauche” antiques Chahan Gallery Renaissance man Chahan Minassian—interior designer, decorator, collector, gallery owner, antique dealer, and designer—will put on view his very own found treasures: Midcentury furniture and individual works from artists he represents, straight from the heart of Paris’s prestigious Carré Rive Gauche antiques area. The lineup includes works by Brooklyn ceramicist Peter Lane, Los Angeles–based ceramic artist Antoinette Faragallah, Belgian conceptual artist Arne Quinze, and Minassian’s own designs.
Mid Century Design Lost City Arts The New York–based gallery famous for its collection of Harry Bertoia works will showcase several pieces by that Italian-American artist, in addition to other postwar American Craft furniture and midcentury Danish and Italian furniture and decorative arts. Select artists include Wendell Castle, George Nakashima, Paul Evans, Louise Nevelson, and Nanna Ditzel.
Moore X Odabashian Nina Johnson An ode to positive and negative space, rug company Odabashian teamed up with Miami-based artist Emmett Moore on a collection of tapestries that combine a curious amalgam of digitally altered and collaged stripes or checkers with natural materials. Each rug is embellished with a unique pattern that was derived from marble, granite, or terrazzo. Some works retain a text water- mark or digital signature that indicates the computer-aided design process.