Posts tagged with "counterfeit":

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Emeco Sinks Restoration Hardware’s Battleship: Navy Chair Dispute Settled

During World War II, the U.S. Government asked Wilton Carlyle Dinges, founder of the Hanover, PA-based Electrical Machine and Equipment Company (now Emeco) to design a lightweight chair rugged enough to "withstand water, salt air and sailors." That design became known as the Navy Chair (or the Model 1006 for purists) and today has become a staple of industrial-chic design. Now you can add "copycats" to that list after a legal dispute, involving a nearly-identical chair from Restoration Hardware called the "Naval Chair," has been settled. Emeco sued Restoration Hardware last October alleging infringement of Emeco's trademark of the Navy Chair. "The irreparable harm caused by Restoration Hardware, an established company, to Emeco’s reputation and significant goodwill is massive, incomparable to that caused by a typical, small-time counterfeiter," the company said at the time in a statement. Now, Unbeige reports that the dispute "has been settled for an undisclosed sum." According to a statement released by Emeco Monday, "As part of that settlement, Restoration Hardware has agreed to permanently cease selling the chairs that Emeco accused of infringement, and its existing inventory of such chairs will be recycled." The larger significance of this settlement is its implications to protecting the intellectual property of designers. Design copyright protection has been a contentious issue between designers, manufacturers, and counterfeiters—even reaching recently to the scale of architecture—and will continue to play out in coming years.
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Target Faux Pas

Though often a friend to the design world, especially to those of us who want to own a little piece of Michael Graves or Marcel Wanders on a writer's budget, Target has really missed the mark with a blatant Le Corbusier knockoff. Our friends at GenuineDesign.com spell it out nicely for us:

Only Cassina, the world famous Milan furniture manufacturer, makes authentic Le Corbusier® furniture. Cassina’s production of Le Corbusier designs is protected by an exclusive, worldwide rights license drawn up in 1964, granted by the Fondation Le Corbusier and the co-authors. According to the Fondation Le Corbusier “all pieces of furniture which do not bear the logotype Cassina, the signature of Le Corbusier and the production number are counterfeits”.

Target is selling two items that it calls the Le Corbusier Petite Sofa ($1118.99) and the Le Corbusier Petite Chair ($558.99), which are also available as a set ($1676.99). Both items are sold out online, and those savvy shoppers seem to have gotten a pretty close fake: Because the furniture for sale at Target is not made or licensed by Cassina, we can only assume that the big box retailer's legal team has been spending a little too much time in the boxed wine aisle. But hey, if they're lucky maybe Target will start selling Harvard Law degrees too.