Posts tagged with "Costumes":

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The Met’s Camp: Notes on Fashion translates an elusive concept into design

Pinning down exactly what defines the concept of “camp” has been attempted by some of pop culture’s brightest minds, but the definition adhered to by the Metropolitan Museum of Art for Camp: Notes on Fashion, the theme of this year's annual Costume Institute show, is a tad more academic. According to Susan Sontag’s seminal 1964 essay Notes on Camp, camp is notoriously difficult to pin down, and even talking about it was to betray the concept. Camp is simultaneously high-brow and low-brow, instantly recognizable, ironic, above and beyond (“extra”), and presents a heightened, absurd reality. Belgian theater designer Jan Versweyveld was asked to translate an elusive-by-nature concept into exhibition design. Versweyveld took a sleek, modern approach to the show’s design, but splashed the walls with pink light and in some rooms, Sontag’s own words. The exhibition begins in the flamboyant reign of Louis XIV in the 1600s, before moving through time to the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s, ending in a massive gallery installation that places products, fashion, accessories, and industrial design objects front and center. Multicolored boxes are used to highlight clothes and items that fulfill a specific definition in the camp canon; a pink flamingo mask in one cubicle, examples of modern dandyism, Björk’s swan dress, and more. Although the Camp show is more restrained that it could have been, given the theme, it seems positively over the top when compared to Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s intentionally austere design for the Heavenly Bodies show last year. Camp: Notes on Fashion runs through September 8 and is accompanied by a publication of the same name.
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See the "People's Choice" winner of this year's Storefront Critical Halloween party!

It seems only fitting that on this November 8, The Architect's Newspaper and the Storefront for Art and Architecture have our own election results to announce. From October 31st to November 7th, we asked you to pick the best costume from this year's Storefront for Art and Architecture Critical Halloween party. Storefront had asked attendees to critique old ideas of excess in art, architecture, and design, reimagining what luxury means in the process. Hosted within the ornate United Palace, the party offered up an excess of excellent costumes: a shimmering Frank Gehry-inspired dress (complete with headgear), money guarded by LLCs, and even a riff on artist Yayoi Kusama and her polka dot pumpkins. We're pleased to announce this year's winner: "The Duck and the Decorated Shed" by Katherina, Katie, and Betty. Thanks for voting! And we hope to see you at next year's party.
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Vote for your favorite Critical Halloween costumes in Storefront for Art & Architecture's annual competition

Each year, the Storefront for Art and Architecture hosts a Halloween Party in New York called "Critical Halloween." Themes have ranged from "Corporate Avant-Garde" to "On Banality, On Metaphor," and the costume contest is the highlight of the night, as party-goers relive the Avant-garde tradition of building fantastic architectural costumes. This year, the theme as "DEMO-", giving dressers-up an open field for ideas, including democracy, demolition, demographics, and even Nicholas DE MOnchaux or MaDEMOiselle. With Halloween receding into the past, it's time to vote for your favorite costume. Vote here and make sure to cast your vote for AN Senior Editor Matt Shaw, pictured below, and his "you figure it out," knowledge-DEMOlishing costume non-sequitur "DEMO? I thought you said DEVO!?" COSTUME COMPETITION PRIZES This year the DEMO jury announced the awards at midnight. The jury was comprised of: Keller Easterling, Winka Dubbeldam, Andres Jaque, and Beatrice Galilee. The jury awarded seven prizes in the following categories: Best Overall Costume “Building Cuts: The Ghost of Matta” Steven Holl Architects Best Individual Costume “Archzilla” Evalynn Rosado – Weiss/Manfredi Best Duo/Couple Costume “Permitted and Unpermitted” Adam Frampton and Karolina Czeczek – ONLY IF Best Group Costume “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon” Francisco Rocha, Joana Bem-Haja, Joana Torres, and Sandra Shizuka Special Prize for Best Demolition Costume “The Fall of the Berlin Wall” Leong Leong Special Prize for Best Demonstration Costume “Smoke” Studio Dror Special Prize for Best Democracy Costume “Democracy, The Puppet of Capital” Miguel de Guzman and Ines Esnal Vote for our editor Matt Shaw here.
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Designer Halloween Costumes

WIth Halloween just a day-and-a-half away, there's not much time to come up with a costume if you haven't already. Our pal Nate Berg over at Planetizen has a rather amusing listing of planning-themed costumes, including LEED certified—"don't get your platinum certification mistaken for a silver"—and our personal favorite, FAR—"This costume illustrates the concept of floor area ratio over the course of the night. At first the ratio is low, as you'll likely be standing and dispersing yourself over a relatively small land area. But by the end of the night when you're passed out on the floor after the party, you'll be taking up much more land area and will therefore represent a much higher FAR." Still, everybody knows architects are more clever than planners, so we've come up with five of our own costumes, and we'd also love to hear yours, so leave suggestions in the comments. *Those weird little building-monsters from Content (see: above). *A Lebbeus Woods drawing *The new New Museum: Just grab some chickenwire and cardboard boxes. *A copy of CATIA, or, for those of a certain age, a T-square and watercolors. *Your average bespeckled, bespoke architect.