Posts tagged with "Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum":

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Cooper Hewitt Open for Business

While the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum's headquarters at the Carnegie Mansion is under renovation (set to reopen in 2014), the museum is popping up in locations across New York City to keep design in the eyes of the public. In the digital world, the Cooper-Hewitt launched its new online store, allowing design enthusiasts to bring a curated selection of products into their homes. The site was launched on Monday by Cooper-Hewitt director and famed industrial design Bill Moggridge at a swanky party in Manhattan's Norwood Club hosted by the museum and party aficionado and Mediabistro founder Laurel Touby. The Cooper-Hewitt also recently launched a website detailing events happening at Design Week NYC.
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Cooper-Hewitt Releases 2012 National Design Awards

And the winners of what wants to be the Academy Awards of design are as follows! The Cooper-Hewitt’s ’s 2012 National Design Award in Architecture goes to Mack Scogin and Merrill Elam in Atlanta. We love the factory for Herman Miller and the Lulu Chow Wang Campus Center for Wellesley College is very cool, too. The Landscape Design award goes to Boston-based Stoss Landscape Urbanism whose interest in infrastructure at such projects as Erie Street Plaza in Milwaukee—part-civic, part-storm-water drainage—is so on message. Totally groovy LA architect Clive Wilkinson Architects wins for his interiors; his clients—Google, Nokia, 20th Century Fox, Disney—are running the world of infotainment! It’s important to know much more about interactive design so study up on the projects of the winner in that field, Evan Roth—doesn’t matter where he’s based, right?—who has harnessed free software and a “hacker ethos” on projects for Laser Tag, White Glove Tracking (with Jay-Z), and the open source Free Art & Technology Lab. Tutor alert! Thom Browne won Fashion and Design and MIT Media Lab’s Design that Matters won corporate/institutional. The big deal awards—Life Achievement and Design Mind—go respectively to the original Ted, Richard Saul Wurman, and to Janine Benyus, co-founder of the “world’s first bio‐inspired consultancy.” And now for all you six-degrees-of-separation theorists, here’s the list of the jurors: John C. Jay of Wieden+Kennedy; Michelle Berryman of Echo Visualization: Jeanne Gang of Studio Gang Architects; Lee F. Mindel of Shelton, Mindel & Associates; Melody Roberts of McDonald’s Corp; Eric Rodenbeck of Stamen Design; Behnaz Sarafpour; Alice Twemlow of D-Crit at the School of Visual Arts; and Charles Waldheim, from the department of landscape architecture at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. The big news this year is that the Cooper-Hewitt dispensed with spending a lot of time dwelling on all the finalists; worthy as they may be, a time-consuming distraction. The gala ceremony—one of Fall’s major nights out—will take place on October 17 at Pier Sixty. Cooper-Hewitt Director Bill Moggridge is very pleased, and said so in a press release: “The National Design Awards program is Cooper-Hewitt’s largest and most widespread educational initiative and celebrates the full spectrum of American design practice. The provocative work of this year’s winners truly shapes the way we experience the world.” Agreed!
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On View> Cooper-Hewitt on Designing Lasting Solutions with the Other 90%

For a long time in the West there has been a common misgiving that aid is about patronage. The Cooper Hewitt's latest exhibition, Design with the Other 90% : Cities, which opened this weekend at the United Nations Visitor's Center, rebukes this notion by spotlighting communities in the southern hemisphere who are taking the initiative, harnessing local resources to solve their own problems. In the show, designers and architects are tapping into existing currents of change. The clue is in the title, which follows on from the 2007 show Design for the Other 90%, which charted products and work that has been imported into impoverished communities. This latest exhibition—focusing on cities—presents a broad spectrum of solutions to critical issues of sanitation, space, communications, and infrastructure. Sixty featured projects were divided into six sections—Exchange, Reveal, Adapt, Include, Prosper, and Access. The projects were selected primarily for their success, which curator Cynthia Smith puts down to qualities of scalability, transferability, applicability in other locations as well as their positive impact. "What's interesting about so many of these projects is there's real application to what's currently happening," said Smith. She cites Urban Think Tank's Vertical Gym as one example. Intended to mark out a safe public space in a dense urban location, the gym has been designed as a kit of parts so it can be programmed and adapted to the site. The Venezuela-based project has been transformed into proposals for New York City public schools, as well as areas in the Netherlands and the Middle East. While all the ideas are site-specific and responsive to local geography, culture, and scale among other factors, the exhibition also features organizations such as Shack/Slum Dwellers International, which is practicing a horizontal exchange and offering a set of design tools that can be applied to problems in various countries, climates, and situations. "The scale of these problems is growing so rapidly that regional and local municipalities can't keep up with the growth, so you get cross-collaborations," said Smith. "The most interesting designs are the hybrid solutions, where the informal settlements and the formal city meet." Because there has been a dearth of information about this kind of design, Smith says that professors were using the last show's catalogue as a text book, so for this next installment, Cooper Hewitt has developed what they consider to be a tool for the next generation of designers. "We are looking at who is addressing these issues," she said. The Design for the Other 90% now has a social network where designers can upload projects and exchange ideas. The statistics are staggering: one billion people are living in informal settlements around the world, and it's projected that this number will increase to two billion by 2030. These facts are much more powerful when one is exposed to the physical artifacts that are the design solutions: bio-latrines that transform human waste into fertilizer and gas for cooking in Nairobi, floating schools and health clinics in flood-prone Bangladesh; favelas painted with women's faces in Rio, and plastic formwork systems that allow the unskilled to build houses in a day in South Africa. The innovations are astonishing. It is easy to produce a self-congratulatory exhibition about how design can help poorer communities around the world, but Cooper Hewitt's new exhibition demonstrates that approach is moot: these communities are already in the process of redesigning themselves.

Eavesdrop NY 13

  COOPER SCOOPER Eavesdrop held a glass to the emergency-exit door of the Cooper-Hewitt and heard rumblings that a ten-member, Smithsonian-led committee was about to announce a new museum director to succeed Paul Warwick Thompson. It sounded as if the committee was down to two candidates—Paola Antonelli and Aaron Betsky. The latter volunteered to a source that he was not in the running, but we think he was merely trying to throw us off the scent. Our olfactory sense is too highly tuned to be distracted. Expect an announcement any minute. BLIND ITEM! What tony architecture firm with a lot of empty desks is using ModelBartenders.com to staff the house for an upcoming interview? Imagine. The prospective client tours the studio, which is stocked with 25-year-old hunks pretending to detail porticoes and dormers, and wonders how they make time to go to the gym. Eavesdrop is fighting the urge to send a disco ball to go with the human props.
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Cooper-Hewitt Director-in-Waiting

Last November, Paul Thompson announced he was giving up directing the Cooper-Hewitt and heading back to London to take over at the Royal College of Art. Ever since then, the speculative interest has been anything but wild, and frankly tepid, about who was going to lead the nation’s only and reputedly arduously bureaucratic National Design Museum, the only New York museum in the Smithsonian’s crown. MoMA’s Paola Antonelli? Cincinnati’s Aaron Betsky? Design’s Everywoman Chee Pearlman? Why not, Mark Robbins? Those who have been watching were expecting an answer, after hearing for months about the interviews. Well, we can now wait some more as the museum has just announced that longtime deputy director Caroline Baumann, who joined the museum as development director in 2001, has been named acting director, effective July 13.