Posts tagged with "Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum":

Weiss/Manfredi, Neri Oxman among winners of 2018 Cooper Hewitt Design Awards

The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum has announced the winners of the 2018 National Design Awards, recognizing ten individuals and firms who have used design to shape the world for the better. This year’s winners include: Lifetime Achievement: Writer, educator, and designer Gail Anderson has taught at the School of Visual Arts in New York for the last 25 years, and is an active partner at the multidisciplinary Anderson Newton Design. Anderson has written or co-authored a total of 14 books on popular culture and design, and formerly served as the senior art director at Rolling Stone. Design Mind: Landscape architect, award-winning author, and Professor of Landscape Architecture and Planning at MIT Anne Whiston Spirn. Spirn was recognized for her longtime advocacy for balancing urbanism with nature, as well as her continued direction of the West Philadelphia Landscape Project. Corporate & Institutional Achievement: Design studio Design for America, which empowers communities to solve local problems through design. Architecture Design: WEISS/MANFREDI was recognized for the way their projects consistently bridge the gap between architecture, art, and the surrounding landscape. The firm’s been on a roll lately, having picked up several cultural commissions and an invite to exhibit at this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale. Communication Design: Digital identity and experience firm Civilization was recognized for its ability to create empathetic connections and commitment to working with companies who are advocating for the greater good. Fashion Design: The Los Angeles-based fashion designer Christina Kim was recognized for her use of traditional hand working techniques and sustainable business practices. Interaction Design: Architect and designer Neri Oxman was recognized for her experimental material usage and continual boundary-pushing forms. Oxman leads the Mediated Matter Group at the MIT Media Lab, a group whose work frequently bridges the gap between art and technology; their most recent project, Vespers, is a contemporary reinterpretation of the death mask typology that uses living microorganisms. Interior Design: The Miami-based Oppenheim Architecture + Design was recognized for its sense-invoking interiors that are often inspired by local vernacular. The firm has realized projects all over the world from towers in Dubai to the Williamsburg Hotel in Brooklyn, but like many of the other winners, Oppenheim balances their projects within the surrounding natural environment. Landscape Architecture: Boston-based landscape architecture firm Mikyoung Kim Design was honored for its vast body of public work, much of it focused on improving urban resiliency. The firm has tackled projects large and small around the world, from the Chicago Botanic Garden Learning Campus to the Songdo International Plaza in Incheon, South Korea. Product Design: Minneapolis-based Furniture designer and manufacturer Blu Dot was recognized for its playful and modern stylings (including some less-than-functional objects). The National Design Awards have been recognizing exemplary names in the design world since 2000. Nominees must have seven years of professional experience under their belt, while the lifetime achievement nominees must have at least 20 years of experience. Caroline Baumann, director of Cooper Hewitt, will announce the winner of the Director’s Award at a later date, to be given to an outstanding patron of the design world. This year’s awards ceremony will be accompanied by National Design Week, which will run from October 13 through the 21st.

Joris Laarman blends industrial, natural and digital in Cooper Hewitt show

The Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum hosted its annual National Design Awards last week, handing out hardware to an illustrious group that included Mass Design Group, Deborah Berke Partners, Surfacedesign, and Susan Szenasy. But if you couldn't make it to the invitation-only event, you can stop by the museum to check out one of the city's most interesting design exhibitions: Joris Laarman Lab: Design in the Digital Age. The first major U.S. exhibition on the Dutch designer, the show explores Laarman and his team's naturally and industrially-inspired, digitally-manufactured products, like the Bone Chair, generated from algorithms that mimic bone growth, and a pedestrian bridge built in midair using 3-D printing. The Adaptation Chair, created from welded strands of coated polymer, draws on the complex patterns of growing branches and roots, changing its geometry to adapt to different needs throughout. Throughout the Cooper Hewitt's galleries you'll encounter tables, chairs, lights and other pieces made of wood, metal, fabric, vinyl and plastic that have been knitted, stacked, puzzled, electroformed, cut, welded, folded, lathed and extruded, all using computer-powered fabrication techniques. Laarman is obsessed with the transition of the industrial world to our digital one. This work perfectly bridges the two. The show is on view through January 15.

Cooper Hewitt exhibition draws a new, refreshing map of American design

"In what ways can design act as a catalyst for change?" "How can design help people learn?" "How might design improve how people live?" "What design strategies help make better local and regional economies?" "How can design save what is authentic and essential to help communities thrive?" These are the questions that organize the exhibition By the People: Designing a Better America, curated by Cynthia E. Smith at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum in New York City. Act, learn, live, make, save are the verbs enabled by design. But what is design itself, an act or a product? In the questions and the examples shown in the exhibition, design is neither fully a product nor an act. Rather, throughout the exhibition, design is an agent that enables actors and leads to actions. According to Smith's introductory essay in the catalogue, work on the exhibition began after the Great Recession of 2008 and involved extensive field research across the United States, including interviews with designers, community advocates, philanthropists, academics, artists, local citizens, undocumented workers, developers, policymakers, and historians. One result of the extensive field research is a refreshing map of design and innovation in America. As Smith seeks to identify the pressing challenges faced by American communities, poverty and the history of injustice emerge as the underlying issues of the American landscape. The map of design today includes shrinking and regressing cities, rural areas as well as major regional metro areas. This map is not bounded by city centers but located in communities that find themselves dwelling at the edges, designing for what Smith identifies as "a shared prosperity." Some highlights of the exhibition include Teddy Cruz's San Diego affordable housing project titled Living Rooms at the Border, Michael Maltzan's Crest Apartments housing project for homeless veterans in Los Angeles's Van Nuys neighborhood, and Matthew Mazzotta's Open House, a house that unfolds to become an open-air stage in York, Alabama. The design processes of these buildings incorporate the visions of different agencies and stakeholders. If these projects are examples of design as objects, other examples highlight how design is close to action: Farm Hack Tools, founded by independent farmers across America, develops and designs open-source agricultural tools in order to expand knowledge and technology of agriculture. The 4th Floor project is an attempt to create a new commons by converting the storage space of a library to a maker space in Chattanooga, Tennessee, thereby changing the traditional definition of a library from a place of consumption of information to production and sharing of knowledge. At a time when traditional public space is declining, these new commons are powerful alternatives. All these examples, spanning from buildings to commons, objects to actions, demonstrate how design today is an agent of change providing tools and bringing form to ideas. By the People: Designing a Better America runs through February 26, 2017.

Institute for Public Architecture to honor Katie Swenson, Carl Weisbrod at 4th Annual Fall Fete

The Institute for Public Architecture (IPA)’s 4th Annual Fall Fete will be held at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum on October 26. The Benefactor’s Reception will begin at 6:30 p.m., with galleries open to view By the People: Designing a Better America and Scraps: Fashion, Textiles, and Creative Reuse. The institute will celebrate the year in socially engaged architecture by honoring Katie Swenson, vice president of national design initiatives at Enterprise Community Partners, Carl Weisbrod, director of the New York City Department of City Planning and chairman of the New York City Planning Commission. Awards will be presented by Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen and New York City Housing Authority Chair Shola Olatoye. The IPA’s first international honoree, and 2016 Pritzker Prize winner, Alejandro Aravena, will offer remarks. The Friends Party, will follow at 8:30 p.m. Reserve your tickets here.

Cooper Hewitt announces fall exhibitions focusing on textiles, socially-responsible design

The two exhibits take a very different approach to their subject matter, with the first heavily centered on a specific medium and industry (textiles) while the second focuses broadly on how design can tackle social challenges ranging from healthcare to transportation infrastructure. Read below for more details! Scraps: Fashion, Textiles and Creative Reuse, Sept. 23–April 16, 2017 Traditional craft and modern sustainability will intersect within this exhibit, which will include more than forty works from Reiko Sudo of Tokyo-based textile design firm Nuno, Luisa Cevese of Milan-based studio Riedizioni, and Christina Kim of Los Angeles-based brand dosa. Museum Director Caroline Baumann said in a press release, “Telling the inspiring and empowering stories of three women designers and entrepreneurs who hail from three continents, Scraps brings critical focus to the human and environmental costs of fashion consumption while also offering viable solutions for reducing waste and raising awareness." By the People: Designing a Better America, Sept. 30–Feb. 26, 2017 Cynthia E. Smith, the Cooper Hewitt’s curator of socially responsible design, spent two years compiling By the People. It will cover 60 projects that relate to health care, alternative transportation, sustainable land use, food, education, and more. An introductory section of the exhibition, which will include a video by Cassim Shepard and an interactive data visualization titled Mapping the Measure of America, aims to explore social inequality in the U.S. and contextualize the other exhibit's other projects. Baumann added "By the People will showcase the innovative and impactful actions generated through design, and inspire creative problem-solving at local, regional, national and even international levels."

34 Nations to submit works for the Inaugural 2016 London Design Biennale

Despite having an established pedigree within the creative world, London has never had its own Biennal(e)—or even Triennale, for that matter. This year however, the city is opening the Inaugural 2016 London Design Biennale, showcasing work from 34 participating countries around the theme of Utopia by Design. Set to be hosted at Somerset House, a former royal palace on the Strand in central London, the Biennale will run from September 7 to 27 this year. On display will be installations curated by leading design institutions from around the world. Participating bodies include USA's Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, DAMnation (Belgium), German Design Council, Moscow Design Museum (Russia), Triennale Design Museum (Italy), India Design Forum, Southern Guild (South Africa), The Japan Foundation, and Victoria and Albert Museum (UK). Other participating nations will be: Albania, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Chile, Croatia, France, Greece, Indonesia, Israel, Korea, Lebanon, Mexico, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Palestine, Poland, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunisia, and Turkey. Judging the contributions will be an an international advisory committee and jury comprised of established figures within the industry who will "award medals to the Biennale’s most significant national contributions." “We are delighted to announce the first ever London Design Biennale to be held at Somerset House," said Dr. Christopher Turner, Director of the Biennale. "500 years after the publication of Sir Thomas More’s classic, we are inviting countries to interrogate the contentious theme, Utopia by Design. These responses will demonstrate the power design has not only to strike up and inform debate, but also as a catalyst: provoking real change by suggesting inspiring or cautionary futures. Alongside the exhibition there will be an ambitious talks programme bringing together the very best international thinkers, and I hope that the Biennale will become a laboratory of ideas that might, in their way, contribute to making the world a better place.” London Mayor Boris Johnson also added: "Just as the London Olympic and Paralympic Games brought the world together through sport, they also inspired it through design, with Barber and Osgerby’s elegant torches and Heatherwick’s kinetic cauldron – a great unifying convergence of nations in fire and copper. In autumn 2016 the London Design Biennale will attract designers, as well as visitors, from all around the world for a vigorous exchange of ideas and ingenuity—the currency of London’s important and world-leading creative economy.”

MOS Architects, Michael Graves among winners of the 2015 Cooper Hewitt Design Awards

The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum started awarding a yearly Design Award in 2000. The award is a jury-selected process that includes among its ten categories honors for Architecture, Interior Design, Landscape Design, and for Lifetime Achievement that has been won by architects. This year's awards were elegantly introduced by the Museum’s Director Caroline Baumann and Tod Williams and Billie Tsien. They honored MOS Architects' Hilary Sample and Michael Meredith, landscape designer Shane Coen at Coen + Partners, and Commune, the Los Angeles interior design firm. In addition, Common Ground founder Rosanne Haggerty was given a Design Mind award, Jack Lenor Larson was awarded the Director's Award, and, fittingly, the late Michael Graves (whose partners claim he told them before he died that he would win the award this year) was given the annual Lifetime Achievement award.

Archtober Building of the Day 13> Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum 2 East 91st Street, Manhattan Babb, Cook & Willard (1902) Gluckman Mayner Architects with Beyer Blinder Belle (2014) Part a historic house tour and part a lesson on material culture and curatorial practices, today’s Archtober lunchtime session packed a ton of information into 60 minutes. Brooke Hodge, deputy director of the Cooper Hewitt, National Design Museum, showed us around one of the finest mansions of Manhattan. Designed by Babb, Cook & Willard in 1902, the Carnegie Mansion’s most recent renovations were completed just last year. Executive architect Beyer Blinder Belle developed the master plan, while Gluckman Tang Architects (formerly Gluckman Mayner Architects, the firm responsible for the Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor that we’ll be touring on Thursday) oversaw the historic preservation aspects of the project. Diller Scofidio + Renfro worked closely with the museum’s curators to develop the display cases and exhibition design. The firm also oversaw the plan of the garden, which, once complete, will open at 8:00a.m. to welcome visitors onto the property even beyond hours of admission. Our dear friends at Pentagram worked on the graphic identity together with the typographer Chester Jenkins, who developed an open-source typeface called the Cooper Hewitt. This initiative was yet another way to make the museum more inviting to the public, and to encourage people to feel connected with design. The renovation added 7,000 square feet of exhibition space to the mansion without expanding the building’s envelope. Offices and the library were relocated to adjacent townhouses, and part of the collection was moved to offsite storage. Other smaller pockets of space were carved out: a former powder room is called the “Teaspoon Gallery,” a play on its location next to the Spoon Gallery, which was named after a donor family. Visitors are encouraged to grab a Pen (note the capital “P” since we still never take ink into exhibitions) at the admissions desk and keep track of their favorite objects. These electronic styluses turn visitors into collectors, and encourage creative moments of exploration. One gallery features a projection screen that covers two walls, reproducing visitor-drawn forms as wallpaper. The digital transformation of these designs into large-scale patterns help visitors connect with the objects on display. Fragments of wallpaper that might otherwise be interpreted as whole objects unto themselves can now be understood as part of repeating patterns that set the tones of entire rooms. Julia Cohen is the Archtober Coordinator at the Center for Architecture.

Michael Graves wins Lifetime Achievement Award in 2015 Cooper Hewitt Design Awards

The Cooper Hewitt has announced the winners of its 16th annual National Design Awards. The program was launched in 2000 as part of the White House Millennium Council to "promote design as a vital humanistic tool in shaping the world." First Lady Michelle Obama is serving as the Honorary Patron for the 2015 awards that are accompanied by a series of programs, educational events, and panels. “With the reopening of the museum this past year, Cooper Hewitt is scaling new heights to educate, inspire and empower our community through design,”said Cooper Hewitt director Caroline Baumann in a statement. “I am thrilled and honored to welcome this year’s class of National Design Award winners, all of whom represent the pinnacle of innovation in their field, with their focus on collaboration, social and environmental responsibility, and the fusion of technology and craftsmanship.” This year, the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award was awarded posthumously to Michael Graves, the famous architect and designer who passed away at the age of 80 in March. In a statement, Cooper Hewitt said the renowned postmodernist is credited with "broadening the role of architects and raising public interest in good design as essential to the quality of everyday life." Graves founded his eponymous firm in 1964, and in more recent years had focused on using architecture and design to improve healthcare. Here is a look at the other 2015 Cooper Hewitt Design Awards winners. Director's Award: Jack Lenor Larsen
From Cooper Hewitt: "Jack Lenor Larsen is an internationally renowned textile designer, author and collector, and one of the world’s foremost advocates of traditional and contemporary crafts.
Design Mind: Rosanne Haggerty
From Cooper Hewitt: "For 30 years, Rosanne Haggerty has worked to demonstrate the potential of design to improve the lives of people living in poverty through affordable housing and human services."
Corporate & Institutional Achievement: Heath Ceramics
From Cooper Hewitt: "For more than 60 years, Heath Ceramics has been known for handmade ceramic tableware and architectural tile that embody creativity and craftsmanship, elevate the everyday and enhance the way people eat, live and connect."
Architecture Design: MOS Architects
From Cooper Hewitt: "MOS Architects is a New York-based architecture studio, founded by principals Hilary Sample and Michael Meredith in 2005. ... Recent projects include four studio buildings for the Krabbesholm Højskole campus in Skive, Denmark; the Museum of Outdoor Arts Element House visitor center in Englewood, Colo., the Floating House on Lake Huron, Ontario, Canada, and the Lali Gurans Orphanage and Learning Center in Kathmandu, Nepal."
Communication Design: Project Projects
From Cooper Hewitt: "Founded by Prem Krishnamurthy and Adam Michaels in 2004, Project Projects is a graphic design studio in New York, N.Y., focusing on art, architecture and culture. Combining a rigorously conceptual approach with innovative modes of visual communication, the studio’s work encompasses a wide range of contemporary graphic media."
Fashion Design: threeASFOUR
From Cooper Hewitt: "Recognized as one of the most innovative fashion labels today, threeASFOUR was founded in New York City in 2005 by Gabriel Asfour, Angela Donhauser and Adi Gil, who hail from Lebanon, Tajikistan and Israel, respectively."
Interaction Design: John Underkoffler
From the Cooper Hewitt: "John Underkoffler is a user-interface designer and computer scientist. His work insists that capabilities critical to humans living in a digital world can come only from careful evolution of the human-machine interface."
Interior Design: Commune
From Cooper Hewitt: "Commune is a Los Angeles-based design studio with a reputation for working holistically across the fields of architecture, interior design, graphic design, product design and brand management."
Landscape Architecture:Landscape Architecture: Coen + Partners
From Cooper Hewitt: "Founded by Shane Coen in 1991, Coen + Partners is a renowned landscape architecture practice based in Minneapolis. Through a process of collaboration, experimentation and questioning, the firm’s work embraces the complexities of each site with quiet clarity and ecological integrity."
Product Design: Stephen Burks
From Cooper Hewitt: "For more than a decade, Stephen Burks has dedicated his work to building a bridge between authentic craft traditions, industrial manufacturing and contemporary design."

Save the date! Here’s your first sneak peek of NYCxDESIGN 2015

We might be in the thick of winter, but planning is already underway for the third annual NYCxDESIGN coming up in the Spring. On Thursday morning, organizers—NYC & Company and the NYC Economic Development Corporation—invited members of the design community, fittingly, to the newly opened and revamped Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum to kick off the week-long, citywide design festivities taking place May 8–19. The program offers a platform to more than 40,000 designers and 3,900 design firms practicing in the city to showcase their work. Over the course of 12 days, a variety of exhibitions, installations, panel discussions, and open studios will be held in venues throughout Manhattan and Brooklyn. Six returning events anchor the program, including: BKLYN DESIGNS (May 8–10), WantedDesign Brooklyn (May 1–19), Collective Design (May 13–17), Frieze Art Fair (May 14–17), WantedDesign Manhattan (May 15–18), and ICFF (May 16–19). The opening night of BKLYN Designs will be the official launch of NYCxDESIGN. If last year's impressive turnout of 2,000-plus listings at 181 venues is telling, then May 2015 will be a busy one for those in the design sector.

Sneak a peek of New York City’s expanded Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum

After a three year absence, the Cooper-Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum is set to reopen on December 12. The nation's design museum has been active in the interim, staging off site exhibitions, hosting workshops and classes, and bestowing honors to the nation's best designers, but its full return to New York's cultural landscape is much anticipated. A large group of top tier designers has contributed to the museum's renovation, expansion, and rethinking of how it displays the objects and processes of design, including Gluckman Mayner Architects, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, PentagramBeyer Blinder Belle, Local Projects, and Thinc Design. The museum reorganized staff areas and moved offices into adjacent townhouses to create new galleries in the landmark Carnegie mansion's third floor, among many other alterations. Here is a sneak peak of some of the reinstalled galleries. Welcome back, Cooper-Hewitt!

Cooper-Hewitt Names Brooke Hodge Deputy Director

As the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum gears up for its reopening later this year, the museum announced today it has hired Brooke Hodge, a widely respected curator and museum administrator, as its new deputy director. Hodge is currently the director of exhibitions and publications at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. She was previously the architecture and design curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in Los Angeles, where she organized shows on Frank Gehry, the automobile designer J Mays, and Skin + Bones: Parallel Practices in Fashion and Architecture. She was let go from MOCA amid financial and organizational disruptions at that museum, which lead to several changes in leadership and the near closure of the museum. Hodge is currently working on an exhibition of Thomas Heatherwick, which will open at the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas in September. “Brooke will be diving into preparations for our opening later this fall, while partnering with me and museum teams on the exciting, future plans for the nation’s design museum,” Caroline Baumann, director of the Cooper-Hewitt, said in a statement.