Posts tagged with "contract furnishings":

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Product> Working It: New Office Furnishings

Although the office-as-playground concept still has legs among the creative class of businesses, workplace interiors are showing signs of maturation. While communal desking remains popular, more contract suppliers are developing solutions to the acoustic and storage issues that are symptomatic of what some view as the overly-open office plan. Allstar (pictured at top) Vitra A looping polyamide armrest distinguishes the design of Allstar, and represents the main structural element on which the mechanical unit of the chair is hinged. Fully adjustable, the chair is available in a variety of colors. Designed by Konstantin Grcic. Steeve Arper Customizable in a wide range of fabrics, leathers and finishes, Steeve’s three versatile, modular components—bench, armchair, and sofa—can be arranged to accommodate any interior space allowing for countless configurations. Steeve’s silhouette is solid and architectural while at the same time appearing slender, light and volumetric. Its uniquely manufactured seamless back and arm covers are stretched to fit the frame; an industry innovation that eliminates the need for more complex upholstery techniques. This technique highlights Steeve’s clean design while plush interior cushions provide a soft seat. Available in a choice of base styles. Designed by Jean-Marie Massaud. sixfivezero Seating Coalesse These wood chairs are stackable up to six high for efficient storage. A wide range of shell, base, and upholstery choices allow for a myriad of finish combinations. Coordinating tables are available. Designed by Lievore Altherr Molina. Concierge Bernhardt Design Sleek and versatile, the Concierge is a workstation that can be customized to fit specific needs. The design lends itself to incorporate televisions, whiteboards, and charging stations for both laptops and mobile devices. Offered in five materials, two heights, and six base options. BuzziFalls BuzziSpace Patterns are CNC-cut into two layers of proprietary acoustic felt. The product can serve as a decorative room divider or be hung in front of a wall, acting as dimensional wallpaper with acoustical properties. Designed to be hung from a ceiling fixture, it comes with a metal profile and a set of cables. Available in seven motifs and two sizes. Designed by Sas Adriaenssens. Bloom Kimball Casual and sophisticated, Bloom fits comfortably in a variety of settings. United by the same base design, the lounge chair offers a tailored seat with optional contrasting fabric, while the occasional tables come in a range of shapes, heights, and materials.
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Sail Away: The Granoff Collection

Fabrikator

Goetz Composites fabricated the Granoff Collection of modular furniture for a new Diller, Scofidio + Renfro-designed building at Brown University.

Brown University’s Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, completed by Diller, Scofidio + Renfro in 2010, was a direct result of the institution’s studies on how students and faculty interact today. Since most interdisciplinary exchanges were taking place in stairwells over classrooms, the architects designed a central escalier with five landings where the school’s population could meet among rotating student installations. One year after the building opened, the users realized that something was missing on the escalier: a place to sit. To rectify the situation, graduate students from the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) collaborated with Brown alumni to design a unique collection of furniture named for the building’s patrons, Perry and Marty Granoff. The alumni designers—Taylor McKenzie-Veal, Scot Bailey, Ian Stell, and Yumi Yoshida—crafted a line of modular furniture that includes a sofa, a chair, and a table that doubles as a stool. The line caters to local industry in materiality; namely the state’s maritime history. “The boating and composite expertise in Rhode Island has a long-standing history of excellence and [we] consulted and collaborated with a local composites and engineering firm while developing and prototyping the design,” said McKenzie-Veal.
  • Fabricators Goetz Composites
  • Designers Taylor McKenzie-Veal, Scot Bailey, Ian Stell, and Yumi Yoshida
  • Location Providence, Rhode Island
  • Date of Completion February 2013
  • Material MDF, fiber reinforced plastic, linear polyurethane
  • Process Rhino, CNC mill
Bristol, Rhode Island-based Goetz Composites worked to realize the designers’ vision for a flexible line of furniture that could be used in various configurations. The sofa, for example, is constructed from a large corner section, a small corner section, and a small center section that can be pulled apart and put together in whatever way the user wishes. “The designers had a very specific look in mind, both in texture and color,” said Chase Hogoboom, president of Goetz Composites. “A lot of time and effort was spent working with the designers to develop the [fabrication] process and achieve the results they were looking for.” To develop a prototype, the design team gave Hogoboom three-dimensional Rhino files outlining each section’s shape and dimensions. The fabricator used RhinoCAM to program the form and a CNC mill to cut medium density fiberboard to the exact shape specified by the designers’ files. “There were very strict requirements for the radius of the edges,” said Hogoboom. Additionally, the design schematic called for two A surfaces, so the front and back of the sofa had to be identical. Once the designers approved the prototype, the fabricators used a custom CNC-cut tool to make the shells of the furniture sections from fiber reinforced plastic (FRP). “The furniture was built for an institutional environment, so it needs to withstand heavy use from students, staff, and visitors,” explained Hogoboom. “Based on the profile of the pieces, it had to be low and streamlined, and we were able to achieve that through the materials we used.” Once the FRP was cut, the fabricator wet sanded—with 1,200 grit—and buffed the sections. Linear polyurethane—air craft-quality paint—was applied in crayon-inspired hues and the sections were bolted into metal frames with integrated cleats. The series is finished off with bright cushions from local upholsterer AJ Read. The sofa is currently on display in Milan as part of the exhibition, Risk and Certainty in Uncertain Times, curated by RISD president John Maeda, and will travel to the States for New York’s Design Week in May.
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NeoCon Notables

The mood was noticeably subdued at this year’s NeoCon World’s Trade Fair in Chicago, which ends today, but many attractive and innovative new products were introduced. For our special Midwest issue we offered a preview of things to look for at the show. Here are a few additional products that stood out at the Merchandise Mart. LIM lighting, Haworth Designed by Pablo Pardo of Pablo Design and the Haworth Design Studio, LIM is an ultra thin aluminum LED task light. LIM is available in desktop, slot or panel mount, and floor-based versions, and is 85 percent more efficient than comparable incandescent lamps. The minimal design keeps sightlines unobstructed and desktops uncluttered. Setu chair, Herman Miller The profile of the new Setu chair evokes the classic Eames Aluminum Group seating, but the plastic spine—polyester to be exact—bends and tilts with the body, unlike the more rigid Eames design. Designed by Berlin-based Studio 7.5, Setu’s spine also includes a high level of recycled content, and is one of the more affordable multipurpose chairs in its class and weighs less than 20 pounds. It is designed for office and home office settings, and includes versions with and without arms, as well as an ottoman and lounge version. It is available to the trade now and will be sold at retail stores beginning in September. Denizen case goods, Coalesse In keeping the Coalesse’s idea of blurring the boundaries between home and office furnishings, the Denizen case goods system brings a distinctly residential feel to private offices. The series, which includes a secretary, tables, benches, towers, overhead storage and display storage, is available in oak, teak, and ash gray. Designed by WilliamsSorel, Denizen’s strong lines and high quality materials make it appropriate for a office/guest rooms or living areas. Stride office system, Allsteel Many of the office systems at NeoCon had clean, horizon lines (unlike all those curvy systems aimed at tech start-ups in the early 2000s), but one of the best looking was Stride from Allsteel. The surfaces have a thin outer edge, but are actually thick and sturdy, thanks to a stepped back design. The system is a kit of parts that can be adapted to a variety of configurations, from traditional cubicles to shared more, open arrangements. Available in a variety of materials, the painted wood storage units in particular feel more like furniture than parts of an office system.