Posts tagged with "Competitions":

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Sukkah STL: A Contemporary Twist on Ancient Tradition

Ten Sukkahs—small temporary structures built for the Jewish festival of Sukkot—will be on display at Washington University in St. Louis. The ten winning projects, by architects and designers from across the country, were chosen out of a group of 40 competition entries. Sukkot recognizes the struggle of the Israelites' exodus from Egypt, and Sukkahs recall the fragile structures they inhabited. Emery McClure Architectre of Lafayette, LA, Act3, Trivers Architecture, and STL Beacon of St. Louis, Filip Tejchman of Brooklyn, NY, Sean Corriel of New York, Lea Oxenhandler and Evan Maxwell Litvin of Philadelphia, Alexander Morley and Jennifer Wong of St. Louis, Casey Hughes Architects of Los Angeles, Christine Yogiaman of St. Louis, John Kleinschmidt and Andy Sternad of New Orleans, Bronwyn Charlton and Linda Levin of St. Louis. The Sukkah STL structures will be on view October 18-22. Jurors included architects Mitchell Joachim and Carol Ross Barney, critic Christopher Hawthorne, Bruce Lindsey, dean of architecture at the Sam Fox School of Design at Washington University, Rabbi Hyim Shafner, and Nancy Berg, a professor of Hebrew language and literature.
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ACADIA Design and Fabrication Competition Winners Announced

Three winning designs to be fabricated by Brooklyn-based Flatcut.

This October, winners of the ACADIA (Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture) design and fabrication competition will show off their parametric chops as part of the organization’s annual conference, now in its 30th year. Announced last week, winners were chosen from 15 finalists by a jury that included Tod Williams of TWBTA, Chris Sharples of SHoP Architects, Tom Wiscombe of Emergent, Dror Benshetrit of Studio Dror, and Thomas Christoffersen of BIG. The competition sought designs in three categories—furniture, partitions, and lighting—and entrants were encouraged to propose hybrid material assemblies that minimized waste and maximized material performance. Tomer Ben-Gal, founder of Brooklyn-based fabrication studio and competition co-sponsor Flatcut, served as technical advisor. Flatcut will fabricate the winning designs in its 100,000-square-foot Passaic, New Jersey, machine shop before they are sent to the conference, held at the University of Calgary, where they will be displayed from October 11-16.
  • Fabricator Flatcut
  • Designers Alison MacLachlan, Bryan Gartner, Richard Cotter, Elizabeth Boone, Adam Buente, Kyle Perry, Andrew Saunders
  • Location International
  • Status Design phase
  • Materials Rubber, heavyweight felt, aluminum, silicone, 3form Ecoresin, aircraft suspension cable
  • Process CNC milling, laser cutting, pressure press
Furniture: RECIP Designs in the furniture category had to be produced using two sheets of flat materials, one rigid and one flexible, no larger than 5 feet by 10 feet. Any material that would be available for sourcing by Flatcut was considered valid. The winning design, RECIP, is a modular furniture system by three students at the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Environmental Design. The project explores scoring techniques applied to 1/8-inch-thick recycled rubber, which is then folded into self-reinforcing and interlocking toothed panels and laminated to heavyweight felt batting. The team showed judges how the rigid yet flexible system could be folded into chairs, tables, shelving, or spatial dividers, then dismantled and recycled at the end of its life. “I think what attracted us [to RECIP] innately in a contemporary way is the fusion of two different materials and the way they performed together,” said competition judge Tom Wiscombe in his comments. “It involved certain types of techniques, like fusing, melting and different modes of manufacturing rather than using a single known tooling process.” Click here to see a PDF of the project boards. Partition: Hyperlaxity Partition category designs were permitted to use three 5-by-10-foot sheets of material to build their designs. The winner, Hyperlaxity: Parabolic Ligaments, was a collaboration between SOM’s Elizabeth Boone and PROJECTiONE design and fabrication studio founded by Adam Buente and Kyle Perry in 2010. The design uses aluminum components, including hundreds of v-clips, o-rings, i-bars, and triangular plates, joined by hexagonal silicone tendons with slits that allow the material to stretch over the aluminum pieces. Judge Dror Benshetrit said the non-modular form pushed parametric design. “I like how technically the inner rings, together with the other shapes create different opposite hexagon forms,” he said. Click here to see a PDF of the project boards. Lighting: Luminescent Limacon Like the furniture category, designs in the lighting category had to be produced using two sheets of rigid and flexible materials within the machine-able dimensions. Inspired in part by the fanciful linen collars of 17th-century Europe, the winning design is made with folded and nested ruffles of laser-cut 3form Ecoresin held together with a lattice of aircraft suspension cable, which produces tensile and compressive forces to create the light’s structural stability. Designer Andrew Saunders, an assistant professor of architecture Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in New York, derived the pendant’s shape from a Limacon curve. The variables of this equation can be changed to produce different lighting effects based on conditions and performance criteria. “That it is two systems, one of a surface system and one of a kind of vector, is what I think together makes it look so beautiful and elegant,” commented Wiscombe. Click here to see the project boards.
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Competition> Envision a Future for the Pruitt-Igoe Site

Building on the renewed interest in the destruction of the Pruitt-Igoe public housing complex in St. Louis, a new competition looks to engage the history and inspire possible future uses for the 33 acre site. Nearly 40 years after the demolition--which Charles Jencks claimed signaled the death of Modern architecture itself--most of the site remains cleared, filled in with trees and grasses that have sprung up over time. Organized by the newly formed non-profit Pruitt-Igoe Now, the competition brief asks, "Can this site itself be liberated from a turbulent and mythologized past through re-imagination and community engagement?" Winning entries will receive small cash awards, and winners and honorable mentions will be exhibited publicly near the site. The organizers are also putting together a symposium at Portland State University, planned for Spring 2012.
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Vlad Tenu′s Minimal Complexity: Tex-Fab

Fabrikator Brought to you by: 

The winner of the second annual Tex-Fab competition explores ideas of modular assembly and material efficiency.

Earlier this year, design practitioners from across the world converged on Houston to attend Tex-Fab 2.0, a two-day conference featuring experts, lectures, and workshops. Tex-Fab is a non-profit initiative founded by Brad Bell (Brad Bell Studio), Kevin Patrick McClellan (Architecturebureau), and Andrew Vrana (METALAB) to create a network of Texas designers focused on exploring issues of parametric design and digital fabrication. The organization hopes to serve as a bridge between academia, professional design offices, and industrial fabricators throughout the country.
  • Fabricator Tex-Fab
  • Designer Vlad Tenu
  • Location Houston, Texas
  • Completion Date February 2011
  • Material 14-gauge aluminum
  • Process laser-cutting, automatic tumbling, manual assembly
Part of the group’s second annual event was the Tex-Fab Repeat Digital Fabrication Competition, which drew teams of one to four designers from 19 U.S. states, 18 countries, and five continents. The jury, including Patrik Schumacher, Marc Fornes, Chris Lash, Lisa Iwamoto, and Blair Satterfield, reviewed 73 entries and chose Minimal Complexity by London-based Romanian architect Vlad Tenu as its winner. In addition to a small cash award, Tenu received the fabricated piece as his prize. Minimal Complexity was developed out of Tenu’s desire to create a minimal surface structure using modular construction. The infinitely expandable structure simulates a virtual soap film optimized for fabrication with only 16 different components. Tex-Fab began by constructing a half-scale model of the design in the University of Texas at Arlington’s Digital Fabrication Lab. Tenu collaborated with Tex-Fab’s co-directors during the three-week process, working out the ideal fabrication and assembly methods for his design. The model’s 2,368 parts were cut and assembled by UTA students into 144 sets of 16.   The Tomball, Texas-based CROW Corporation machined the finished components, cutting them from 14-gauge aluminum sheets with an Amada 4000 Watt laser. The pieces were then passed through an automatic tumbler to de-burr the edges, making for a safer assembly and resulting in a finer material finish. Working with production manager Thomas Behrman and students in the University of Houston Digital Fabrication Seminar, the Tex-Fab team assembled the parts into a 12-foot-high, 115-square-foot structure within the atrium of the university’s Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture building designed by Philip Johnson and John Burgee in 1985. Plans for Tex-Fab’s third conference and competition in February 2012 are already in the works.
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Gowanus On My Mind

  The Gowanus Canal has been in the news a lot lately, with its superfund designation and sunken schooner. The canal and surrounding neighborhood have long fascinated architects and urbanists, and has been the subject of numerous architecture school design studios. A new ideas competition looks to develop that fascination into a series of proposals for the site, which would improve connectivity across and around the polluted waterway and take better advantage of the area's unique history, character, and economic potential. Sponsored by Gowanus By Design, Connections: The Gowanus Lowline competition site area covers the length of the canal from the flushing station at Butler Street to the Nineth Street Bridge and may include the uplands on either side. Entrants may also choose to focus narrowly on the canal corridor. Greg Pasquerelli, David Lewis, Julie Bargmann, Richard Plunz, Andrew Simon, and Joel Towers will serve as jurors. The April 1 registration deadline is approaching, and entries are due on April 17.  
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Design Deeply But Maybe Don′t Breathe Deeply

Chicago may boast one of the country's largest urban solar installations, but it's also home to two polluting coal-fired power plants, the Fisk Generating Station in Pilsen and the Crawford Generating Station in Little Village both operated by Midwest Generation. The two plants emit toxins and advocates say they contribute to elevated asthma rates in those neighborhoods. A new competition ask designers propose solutions to the problem, which could be anything from educational campaigns to remediation strategies. Sponsored by Design Makes Change, the ideas competition calls for "hyperlocal" strategies and asks designers to select specific sites within the neighborhoods, such as an individual school or a healthcare facility. The winner will receive $2000 of seed money toward implementing their proposal. For more listings, head over to our competitions page.
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Minneapolis Riverfront Redesign Team Selected

The Berkeley, California and Boston-based team of Tom Leader Studio and Kennedy & Violich Architecture has won a competition for the potential redevelopment 5.5 miles of the Minneapolis Riverfront. Their proposal, called RiverFIRST bested those by rivals Ken Smith, Stoss Landscape Urbanism, and Turenscape, and includes constructed wetlands for stormwater management, manmade islands for habitat, new districts for green industry among other features. While no specific segment of the plan has yet been identified for development, the team will be given a commission by the Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board.
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Competing Visions for Chicago, Big and Small

Two new competitions of note explore possible futures for Chicago's public realm. The 2011 Burnham Prize ideas competition sponsored by AIA Chicago and the Chicago Architectural Club calls for new visions for the McCormick Place East building, the 1971 modernist covention center on the lakefront designed by Gene Summers of C.F. Murphy Associates. The massive, Miesian building has a powerful presence on the lakefront, and a vast column-free interior, but parks advocates have long contended it should be removed. Meanwhile, the building's owner, the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority, says it needs $150 million in repairs and is functionally obsolete. The competition aims to inspire new dialogue around the future of the building and site. The Street Furniture 2011 competition sponsored by Architecture for Humanity's Chicago chapter aims for something more universal, new street furniture that could be deployed to activate almost any vacant site. With a $1000 budget in mind, the competition calls for a piece or pieces of street furniture that could activate an open lot for a year in anticipation of future development as a garden. The furniture could then also be moved to a new site. The winning design will be built and installed at an unnamed location.
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Clean Tech Deadline Tomorrow

For you last-minute types, the deadline to register for AN and SCI-Arc's Clean Tech Corridor Competition is the end of the day tomorrow. The competition asks architects, landscape architects, designers, engineers, urban planners, students and environmental professionals to create an innovative urban vision for Los Angeles' CleanTech Corridor, a several-mile-long development zone on the eastern edge of downtown LA (which includes a green ideas lab and a Clean Tech Manufacturing Center). Entries should look beyond industrial uses; creating an integrated economic, residential, clean energy, and cultural engine for the city through architectural and urban strategies. That could include not only sustainable architecture and planning, but new energy sources, parks that merge with buildings, new transit schemes, and so on. While registration is due tomorrow, entries are due on September 30. So get a move on!! You can download the brief here.
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And Then There Were Five

The competition to improve the grounds and urban connectivity at the St. Louis Arch site has attracted attention from some major talents in architecture, landscape, and engineering. The list of competitors has been trimmed to five: the Michael Van Valkenburgh-led team, the Weiss/Manfredi team, SOM Chicago/Hargreaves/BIG, the Behnisch-led team, and PWP/Foster + Partners/Civitas. The winner will be announced in late September.
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Highway to Isolation

Multidisciplinary teams are working to rethink the grounds surrounding the Eero Saarinen-designed Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, better known as the St. Louis Arch, to improve its connectivity with the city and the riverfront. An editorial in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch is calling on the teams to substantially rework I-70, which creates a barrier along the park's western edge. When the interstate highway system was being designed, many routes were planned along waterfronts that were then falling out of use for industry and shipping. As waterfronts have come back in fashion as urban amenities, many communities are struggling to work around or remove these highways. The Post-Dispatch advocates removing the 1.5 mile stretch all together. Definitely something for the teams to ponder.
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Imagined Infrastructure

cityLAB, an urban think-tank at UCLA's Department of Architecture and Urban Design, has announced the six finalists of its WPA 2.0 competition. The competition, which stands for working public architecture, invited designers of all stripes to submit proposals for rebuilding our cities' infrastructure as a sort of throwback to the Great Depression-era WPA. Juried by Stan Allen, Cecil Balmond, Elizabeth Diller, Walter Hood, Thom Mayne, and Marilyn Jordan Taylor, the top-six picks run the gamut from heading off an impending water crisis to creating a softer, gentler version of our infrastructure. One finalist, Urban Algae: Speculation and Optimization, Mining Existing Infrastructure for Lost Efficiencies, proposes to harvest CO2 emissions through photosynthesis. Submitted by PORT Architecture + Urbanism, the solution could be rolled out nationwide on coal-fired power plants and toll booths, but the designers also outlined a scheme for creating a public park on floating pontoons between Lower Manhattan and Red Hook, which would harvest emissions from the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel. Read about the other finalists after the jump. Coupling Infrastructure: Water Ecologies/Economics, submitted by Lateral Office/Infranet Lab, focuses on America's impending water crisis, particularly in southwest cities. Using Salton Sea in California as a case study, the proposal imagines combining recreational activities with economic opportunities such as the production of salt and drinking water on floating "island pods" that serve as platforms. Border Wall as Infrastructure, submitted by Rael San Fratello Architects, investigates unplumbed potentials for the Mexico-U.S. border fence. Costing an estimated $1,325 per linear foot, the barrier structure could incorporate many more useful amenities to offset the negative consequences it has wrought, such as disruption of animal habitat and the diversion of water runoff that has flooded towns. The proposal sets forth 30 alternatives to the plain-Jane obstacle that seek to combat things like the energy crisis and death from dehydration. Some of the suggestions, however, are more artistic in nature, such as the Teeter-Totter wall, which makes a comment on U.S.-Mexico labor relations. 1,000,000,000 Global Water Refugees, submitted by UrbanLab, looks into the possibilities created by the Rust Belt's loss of population combined with its abundance of fresh water. The proposal suggests relocating water-starved populations into underused industrial sites in Milwaukee, Buffalo, Detroit, Chicago, and Cleveland. Hydro-Genic City 2020, submitted by Darina Zlateva and Takuma Ono, turns LA's waterworks into energy-generating social nodes. With a lot of solar panels and a little design sense, the proposal creates urban beaches, aquatic parking lots, energy-generating water towers, and mist-infused light rail stations. Local Code: Healing the Interstitial Landscape, submitted by UC Berkeley architecture and urban design professor Nicholas de Monchaux and a team of collaborators, sets its sights on San Francisco's abandoned streets: those no longer maintained by the city. The proposal imagines a network of public parks on these neglected sites, of which there are more than 1,600.