Posts tagged with "Columbia University":

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Obama library round-up: Woodlawn, Lakeside, Bronzeville and more vying for nation’s 14th presidential library

Speculation over the future site of President Barack Obama’s presidential library has picked up as a slew of Chicago sites—as well as some in New York, Hawaii, and even Kenya—made the June deadline for proposals. Ultimately the decision is up to the President and the board tasked with developing what will be the nation’s 14th presidential library, but dozens of groups are attempting to tug at that group's ears. (Even I used AN's June editorial page to consider the library's urban impact.) Here’s a round-up of some of the Chicago proposals made public so far. 63rd Street New York-based Michael Sorkin Studio released its plan for the library in January, proposing a campus stretched out along three blocks of 63rd Street in Chicago’s Woodlawn neighborhood. They’re “highly conceptual” designs, as are most floated so far, but the plan calls for a campus centered around a ring-shaped building and extending several blocks. The development would make use of dozens of vacant lots in a struggling neighborhood adjacent to the University of Chicago. Bronzeville There’s a concerted effort to bring Obama’s library to Bronzeville, the South Side neighborhood and “black metropolis” vying to become a national heritage area. One prominent site there is the area once home to the Michael Reese Hospital. Combined with parking lots on the other side of South Lake Shore Drive, the site would total 90 acres of lakefront property. It’s been targeted for other large developments, including a casino, a data center and housing for Olympic athletes during Chicago’s failed 2016 bid. A few years ago SOM led a team of designers and developers tasked with sizing up the site for redevelopment, and you can read their plans here. HOK recently floated a plan for redevelopment of the Michael Reese site, including a rendering (at top) of the proposed library. Lakeside McCaffery Interests and U.S. Steel teamed up to rehabilitate that industrial giant’s nearly 600-acre lake infill site in the neighborhood of South Chicago. It’s the largest undeveloped site in the city. The Chicago Sun-Times’ Lynn Sweet first reported last week that McCaffery threw his hat in the ring for Obama's library. Renderings from SOM, Lakeside’s lead design firm, show a heavy walkway that twists elegantly upward around a glass box, jutting over Lake Michigan that appears here as if it were the world’s largest reflecting pool. Chicago State University Down the road from Lakeside, Chicago State University is also a potential site. It's situated in Roseland, where Obama worked as a community organizer. For the Huffington Post, Hermene Hartman argued CSU is the best place for the library, because it would have the greatest neighborhood impact. University of Chicago The U of C called the library "an historic opportunity for our community," and—to no one's surprise—submitted a proposal to bring Obama's legacy back to where he taught law. They set up a website for the bid, but no images or details are publicly available at this time. University of Illinois Chicago U of I is among the institutions of higher education vying for the library, and it has proposed three plans on the West Side: a 23-acre site in North Lawndale; an “academic” option at UIC-Halsted; and a “medical” option at the Illinois Medical District, which is also home to another long-vacant white elephant—the Cook County Hospital building. McCormick Place As reported by Ted Cox for DNAinfo Chicago, Ward Miller, president of Preservation Chicago, thinks the library could revitalize the underused Lakeside Center East Building at McCormick Place, the massive convention center on Chicago’s near South Side. Miller previously proposed that the building be considered for George Lucas' Museum of Narrative Art.
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Chicago’s School of the Art Institute taps Jonathan Solomon as head of architecture

Chicago’s top art school announced big changes in its design department this morning. The School of the Art Institute of Chicago Thursday announced their selection of Jonathan Solomon as the new Director of the Department of Architecture, Interior Architecture, and Designed Objects (AIADO). Solomon, who comes from his position as associate professor and associate dean at the School of Architecture at Syracuse University, assumes the job officially on August 1. In 2010 Solomon, who holds a Bachelor of Arts in Urban Studies from Columbia University and a Master of Architecture and Certificate in Media and Modernity from Princeton University, helped curate Workshopping: An American Model of Architectural Practice at the Venice Architecture Biennial. He is the co-founder of 306090, a nonprofit arts stewardship organization. He previously taught design at the City College of New York, the University at Buffalo, and the University of Hong Kong, where he led the Department of Architecture as Acting Head from 2009 to 2012. He is a licensed architect in the State of Illinois. Solomon recently spoke on a Chicago Architecture Foundation panel discussing Chicago Tribune architecture critic Blair Kamin’s series on Chicago designers in China. He is related to Lou Solomon, who helped found Chicago design firm Solomon Cordwell Buenz (SCB).
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Yeezus! What a Jury! The Living and The Dead at MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program

The MoMA PS 1 jury process that selected the “100 percent organic pavilion Hy-Fi” for its 2014 pavilion may have been a contentious group. The museum announced last month that David Benjamin, the principal of Brooklyn-based firm The Living, would design the temporary structure. But several sources have told Eavesdrop that one of the short listed firms (Collective-LOK, PARA-Project, WOJR, over,under, Fake Industries Architectural Agonism, LAMAS, Pita + Bloom) was in fact told that it—not Benjamin—had won the design competition. The architects were told to come to a PS 1 meeting to discuss moving forward as the winner, but after waiting for an hour they were told that a member of the jury was not there and the meeting could not take place. They waited patiently for another hour until they were asked to go home and wait—“don’t call us, we’ll call you.” Later that week, a MoMA official contacted the firm and told them that, actually, Benjamin and his firm had been selected as the winner of the coveted summer pavilion—oops, sorry. It was, of course, a devastating blow. So devastating that the architects are not willing to talk about the episode. So MoMA will go forward with the “organic” brick pavilion. Benjamin employer Columbia University reported in its May 15 GSAPP newsletter that “Kanye West and GSAPP faculty member David Benjamin (M.Arch ‘05) are working on a ‘strictly confidential’ project.” Though other sources claim that this project involves a “new type of movie theater and 3D entertainment experience,” can we expect Benjamin’s partner to take part in PS 1’s usually rollicking summer party to inaugurate the pavilion?
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Revolving Dean Door: Schools Coast to Coast In Search of New Leadership

There is a rumor making its way around the West Coast that Thom Mayne may have more than a new building in New York. He may be headed east to become dean of Columbia University, replacing the departing Mark Wigley. But we have also heard—despite his protests that he is happy sailing to Catalina—that Greg Lynn may also be interested in the Morningside Heights position. It could be that Lynn would join his wife, Sylvia Lavin, who has long coveted an East Coast deanship. How about if Mark Wigley and MoMA’s departing Barry Bergdoll simply swap positions? There seem to be no end to the rumors of who may be filling one of the vacant deans posts at Cooper Union, Columbia, California College of the Arts in San Francisco, Cranbrook, or the University of Kentucky. We hear that Cooper Union is assembling names and has created a short list (who would want that job now?) that includes the names of several current deans as well as alumnus Daniel Libeskind and philosopher poet Peter Lynch. Then what will happen in the next two years when deanships become available at Penn Design, Yale, and Sci-Arc? Now that Aaron Betsky has left parochial Cincinnati he may be looking for a more hospitable place to work.
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Wigley Steps Down as Dean of Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture

Mark Wigley (Courtesy Columbia University) Mark Wigley, pictured, is stepping down as Dean of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, a role that he has held for the past decade. Wigley, a New Zealand–born architect and author, will continue his position through the academic year. Columbia’s president, Lee C. Bollinger, made the announcement through email, affirming that “in every context, [Wigley] has represented the School and the institution in ways that make us all proud to be part of such a vibrant place.” (Photo: Courtesy Columbia)
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Bergdoll Stepping Down as A+D Chair at MoMA, Returning to Columbia

bergdollbarry_portraitII Barry Bergdoll is stepping down as Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art, a position he has held since 2007. He will return to teaching at Columbia University and will take up an endowed chair in the Department of Art History and Archaeology. He will stay on part-time at MoMA to continue working on a major exhibition on Latin American architecture currently scheduled for 2015. He will also advise on the use and development of the Frank Lloyd Wright archive, which is jointly owned by Columbia and MoMA. While at the Modern, Bergdoll has curated a wide variety of shows, addressing topics ranging from prefabricated housing to the Bauhaus to rising sea levels. His recent exhibitions have included a widely praised show on the french architect Henri LaBrouste, and Le Courbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes (co-curated with Jean-Louis Cohen), which is currently on view. Bergdoll's tenure as chair has been marked both by a deepening of the historical and scholarly quality of the exhibitions and programming as well as greater engagement with social issues, such as affordable housing and climate change. In an email to AN, Bergdoll wrote, "I look forward to...continuing to be associated not only with the world’s oldest curatorial department of architecture and design, but I think its most vibrant and finest." MoMA will begin a search for his successor at the end of August.
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Major Gift to Columbia Will Help Jumpstart Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s Business School Plans

In May, Ronald O. Perelman, Chairman and CEO of MacAndrews & Forbes Holdings and a member of the School’s Board of Overseers, pledged a milestone donation of $100 million to Columbia Business School, which could help jumpstart the construction of two new facilities to be built on Columbia’s Manhattanville campus. Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, the structures will incorporate zig-zag cutaway facades akin to the design seen in Columbia’s Washington Heights medial center plans, also by the firm. The business school buildings will provide a total of 450,000 square feet of space, some of which will be allotted to the increasingly popular collaborative gathering spaces that university campuses have come to know well. The new buildings are designed to accommodate the fast-paced, technologically advanced, and vastly communal character of 21st-century business and business education with multifunctional areas meant to cultivate a sense of community for students, faculty, and alumni. Columbia Business School Dean Glenn Hubbard has disclosed that the donation will permit the School to reach a new chapter in its extension into Manhattanville, located immediately north of the University’s current Morningside Campus. The planned Manhattanville campus is a $6.3 billion project with projected completion set for sometime within the next couple decades. Perelman’s donation marks the $455 million mark of a $600 million funding goal. In appreciation of Perelman’s generosity, one of the two future buildings expected to open within the next decade will be named the Ronald O. Perelman Center for Business Innovation. Columbia will name the other of the two new facilities The Henry R. Kravis Building in honor of Henry Kravis’s 2010 gift.
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Renzo Piano’s Brain Behavior Institute Breaks Ground at Columbia’s Manhattanville Campus

Construction of Columbia University’s 17-acre Manhattanville campus is now underway in northern Manhattan. The Wall Street Journal reported that work has already started on the foundation of the Jerome L. Greene Science Center that will house the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute. This 450,000-square-foot glass building, designed by Renzo Piano, is the first of 15 new buildings to be built on the campus and is slated to open in 2016. Future plans for Columbia’s expansion include new homes for the Columbia Business School and the Lenfest Center for the Arts. Developer and Boston Properties CEO Mortimer Zuckerman has pledged $200 million to the endowment of the institute. The tab for the entire campus should run up to $6.8 billion.
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Slideshow> Frank Lloyd Wright Archive Moving to New York

This morning AN reported that a massive collection of Frank Lloyd Wright's architectural drawings, photographs, models, and more are heading to a new home at New York's Museum of Modern Art and Columbia University's Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, opening up the archive to academic and scholarly research. For your enjoyment, below is a sampling of the treasures encompassed in the collection and a video about the news. Click on a thumbnail to launch the slideshow. All images courtesy the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives/Avery/MoMA unless noted otherwise.
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Unveiled> DS+R Designs Columbia’s Medical and Graduate Education Building

Medical and Graduate Education Building Architect: Diller Scofidio + Renfro Architect of Record: Gensler Client: Columbia University Medical Center Location: Haven Avenue and 171st Street Groundbreaking: Early 2013 Completion: 2016 Columbia University Medical Center has unveiled plans for the Diller Scofidio + Renfro-designed Medical and Graduate Education Building on its campus in Washington Heights. Visible from nearby George Washington Bridge and Riverside Park, the 14-story tower will become a major landmark in the skyline of northern Manhattan, with a south-facing multi-story glass façade punctuated by jutting floorplates and exposed interior spaces. The building will house the four schools of CUMC along with the biomedical departments of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. The building will feature technology-enabled classrooms, operating rooms, and other real world clinical environments, collaborative and quiet study spaces, an auditorium, student lounges and cafes, and multiple outdoor spaces, all woven into the spiraling system of floor plates expressed on the structure's exterior. Social and public spaces are stacked along a central circulation stair dubbed the “Study Cascade” running the full height of the building. The Study Cascade holds a system of alcoves designed to foster collaboration and team-based learning and is clad in cement panels and wood, occasionally piercing the glass southern facade with protruding balconies and terraces. Classrooms, clinical simulation space, and administrative offices are housed in the northern face of the tower. “Spaces for education and socializing are intertwined to encourage new forms of collaborative learning among students and faculty, ” Elizabeth Diller wrote in a statement The tower will serve as a visual landmark for the northern limit of Columbia’s medical campus and its announcement follows the release of plans for the school’s Manhattanville expansion to the south of the new building. Construction on the tower is expected to begin in early 2013 and will take approximately 42 months. Columbia hopes the building will meet LEED-Gold standards for sustainability.
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Close Look at Columbia’s Manhattanville Public Spaces, and Its Clean Construction Practices

Thanks to state of the art green building technologies and a proactive clean construction plan, Columbia University’s 17-acre Manhattanville campus in West Harlem is set to become New York City’s first LEED-Platinum certified neighborhood plan. Columbia is successfully mitigating the environmental effects of the 6.8 million square feet of new construction that is currently underway on the former industrial site between 129th and 133rd Streets, Broadway and 12th Avenue, just north of the main Morningside Heights campus, by teaming up with the Environmental Defense Fund and carefully limiting the noise, dust, and soot that emanates from the site. The university has also released new renderings, showing the landscape and public spaces designed by James Corner Field Operations.  The plan incorporates academic and research space, underground parking, civic and cultural facilities, as well as commercial space and 94,00 square feet of open space, including a one-acre public square. This new urban campus, which will be built over the next 25 years, represents a distinct departure from the insular walled-in model of Columbia’s Morningside Heights campus, as the University plans to create pedestrian friendly landscapes, widen sidewalks, convey transparency and openness with glass faced ground floors, and provide opportunities for local small businesses and entrepreneurs by leasing out storefronts on the new buildings.
While the University has demolished 33 buildings in the area, as much as 90 percent of the materials have been saved or recycled. All diesel construction equipment, running on ultra-low sulfur fuel, is equipped with particulate filters which release neither soot nor smell, and electric power is used whenever possible. To help create a dust free construction site, all construction vehicles have their wheels and undercarriages washed down twice before they leave the site, and the water use is recycled for future washes. A composite wall of Jersey barriers, plywood fencing, and noise blankets surrounds the entire operation. “Construction can either be an environmental nuisance to people,” said Philip Pitrruzello, Vice President of Columbia’s Manhattanville Construction, in a statement, “or construction can work with a community to help make livable cities.”