Posts tagged with "Collective Design":

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Highlights from ICFF 2018

There's a lot to see this year at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF). In addition to the new designs introduced by brands, designers, and studios, there is also a fashion collection, capsule collections, and new collaborations. Below we survey a handpicked selection of highlights you won’t want to miss. Warm Nordic at Together Nordic Design This collection is an ode to traditional Nordic minimalism. The charming wooden furnishings are part of Together Nordic Design an an exhibition curated by Snohetta that features a selection of furnishings from brands based in in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. Roto m.a.d. Furniture design Fun yet functional, these colorful clock-shapes are designed to be used as both stools and side tables. The stool-table hybrid transform when flipped, emulating the aforementioned time measuring device. Either / Or  at Collective Concept NYC-based studio The Coast debuted its first collection ever, a poetic lighting series inspired by the dichotomy between aesthetics and ethics. The fixtures turn on and off via human touch, which intentionally, causes them to gently rock to-and-fro.   Basalt Tala British light purveyor Tala introduced sand cast, mouth-blown borosilicate glass fixtures inspired thousands of extruded basalt rock columns that make up the Giant’s Causeway in  Northern Ireland. The petite collection of just two includes a ceiling pendant and touch-on-off table lamp. Arc Stools Skylar Morgan Furniture + Design These stools take the form of arched loggias. The Atlanta-based studio Skylar Morgan Furniture + Design fashioned the silhouette from wood, brass, and leather.

Self-cleaning and sustainable facade Neolith + PURETi

This facade system is treated with an aqueous and titanium dioxide nanoparticle-based treatment, which creates a photocatalytic, self-cleaning, and decontaminating effect. Put simply, the photocatalysis-activated coating is accelerated by light, decontaminating the surface millions of times per second. As a byproduct, the autonomously cleaned cladding also improves air quality.

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At Armory Week, Alex Schweder explores how buildings make us all performance artists

For Alex Schweder, buildings happen in time. The architect and artist bridges the gap between performance and architecture, suggesting that architecture was always already a field concerned with performance, from the way we shape space to the way it performs on us and guides our interactions with others and the space itself. During Armory Week, New York City’s spring collection of art fairs centered around The Armory Show, Schweder is exploring these ideas of architectural performativity with two different installations in the city. Schweder’s piece Davenports Yawn is on view as part of Collective Design. The installation was inspired by his 2013 piece for the Lisbon Architecture Triennale, Slowly Ceiling, and it continues his use of inflatable architecture. Davenports Yawn is a soft, inviting space where strangers face one another in a moment of respite and architecturally scripted intimacy. Davenports Yawn was curated by Rozalia Jovanovic and made in collaboration with Davide Quadrio at materials manufacturer Alcantara, who commissioned the work. Across town at the Armory Show is My Turn (2018), presented by the Los Angeles gallery Edward Cella Art and Architecture. A collaboration between Schweder and Ward Shelley, the piece premiered as part of Armory’s Platform program, which is dedicated to large, site-specific works. My Turn is a 16-foot wheel with two platforms to be occupied by Schweder and Shelly each day for eight hours during the fair. As its name suggests, the turning wheel requires taking turns. By design, both artists cannot sit on the wheel at the same time. The "my" in My Turn becomes a point of contention. This constant negotiation around the wheel explores the dynamic between the environment, built or otherwise, and humanity. Its structure is one of inherently restricted capacity. The wheel becomes agentic precisely by delimiting the agency of those who use it—here, ironically, its own designers. It begs the question: who (or what) is actually in charge? My Turn looks at the delicate balance of building our world and living among each other, especially in a time of ever-shrinking resources and ever-growing populations.  Davenports Yawn and My Turn will be on view through the end of the fairs, on March 11. Davenports Yawn Collective Design Skylight Clarkson North 572 Washington Street New York, NY Through March 11 My Turn The Armory Show Piers 92 & 94 711 12th Avenue at 55th Street New York, NY Through March 11
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At Collective Design, inflatable landscapes, spinning playgrounds, and other architectural highlights

AN’s editors toured the 6th edition of The Collective Design Fair at the Skylight Clarkson North this morning. At the fair known for its creative installations, we strolled through aisles of booths occupied by design-focused galleries and site-specific creations by local designers and museums. Several, highlighted below, walk that dazzling line between art, design, and architecture.   Natural Workshop by Jesse Seegers and Brook Landscape Tucked behind the show lies an ephemeral playground by Jesse Seegers surrounding a forested landscape by Brook Landscape. Seegers describes the process as “inflatable spaces I design, make the patterns for, cut out, and do physics simulations, digitally, to see what the finished design will look like.” The actualized forms are inflated by a constant stream of air that inflates three "breathing" plastic bellies. “I intentionally designed very simple forms,” explained Seegers. “This one is a standard tube, while the other two are tapered, which exaggerates the perspective.” VIP lounge by Leonidas Trampoukis and Eleni Petaloti of LOT office for architecture Though it is called the VIP lounge, founding partner of LOT and Objects of Common Interest, Leonidas Trampoukis, would describe the topography of glass blocks and slabs of acrylic his firm created as “more an installation.” Fashioned from translucent cuboids from Glass Block Warehouse Inc. and glossy umber-hued acrylic by Plaskolite, the purely decorative furnishings exude whimsical and textural vocabulary. My Reality by Crosby Studios Harry Nuriev, founder of Crosby Studios, is heavily influenced by growing up in Moscow. His Collective booth is lined by larger than life photos of his childhood apartment complex, a place he left at just 10 years old. While he practices primarily in New York City, the artist and architect draws inspiration from his formative years, in this case, the nostalgic memory of the traditional carousels of his younger years. Nuriev reinterpreted his childhood playground as a vibrant purple roundtable that spins in circles, a symbolic gesture to his formative years and inspiration. The Dream by Fernando Mastrangelo Inspired by Henri Rousseau’s painting The Dream, Fernando Mastrangelo created a sumptuous, curvilinear furniture landscape fashioned from sand molded with acrylic resin. Mastrangelo explains that the process to make wall tiles and other furniture, “as kind of like sand castle-style packing sand, only into a mold.” A surreal mountainous landscape surrounds the focal point of the space, a sand-cast sofa upholstered in oxblood cashmere, while the painting is visible through a nook in the wall, making the deep emeralds, reds, and oranges glow richly throughout the tableau.
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Collective Design Fair 2017 Recap

Collective Design opened today for its fifth fair focused on 20th- and 21st-century design with 28 exhibitors. Founded by architect and interior designer Steven Learner specifically for the design and architectural community, the fair will host galleries, designers, and commercial brands from May 3 to May 7. The design world continues to be enraptured by surrealism and, as a result, bright colors and fantastical forms reigned throughout. Paris-based Swiss designer, Mattia Bonetti’s work was highlighted as the Collective Influence installation that included Bonetti’s riotous sofa and Seussical-style lamp and side table. Just around the corner, R & Company touted the new generation of maximal whimsy with pieces by the Haas Brothers, Katie Stout, and Porky Hefer. More and more, companies are integrating technology to take the possibility of designs to new heights. At Collective, Othr’s 3-D printed works and Flavor Paper’s use of water-based conductive ink make a strong showing. Othr’s Vanguard Series took advantage of 3-D printing (Othr 3-D prints all of its wares, partnering with designers to create its pieces) by having Murray Moss, Annabelle Selldorf, Felix Burrichter, Christian Larsen, and India Mahdavi each nominate an emerging designer to create a piece for Othr. As a result, Egg Collective, GT2P, Ania Jaworska, Marie-Victoire Winckler, and Chen Chen and Kai Williams all created stunning vessels in a variety of 3-D printed porcelain, steel, and bronze. Flavor Paper presented Conduct, a playful immersive installation that demonstrated the ability of wallpaper to transfer energy. Flavor Paper founder Jon Sherman discovered water-based conductive ink two years ago and partnered with UM Project to help display its potential. By pressing dots on the wallpaper, one can activate lights, sound, and movement in the installation. Other highlights included new iterations of Apparatus’s, Stickbulb’s, and Calico Wallpaper’s offerings from Milan Design Week, as well as the Noguchi Museum’s Waiting Room installation of Robert Stadler and Isamu Noguchi’s works, which coincides with an exhibition at the museum (far, far away in Queens). Thanks to Collective Design’s manageable size (one can easily navigate the entire show in under two hours), and fresh offerings, it will undoubtedly be a popular stop on this month’s design circuit.
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On View> This might be your only chance to see this rare Le Corbusier tapestry commissioned by Jørn Utzon

In mid May, New York City will be over run with fairs, exhibitions, and trade shows dedicated to design and art. The big events are the International Contract Furniture Fair (ICFF) and the Frieze Art Fair, but there will be literally scores of smaller spin-off events taking place that will be of interest to the architecture community. The Architect’s Newspaper will highlight all of these events in a special May 6 issue. One exhibit and show not to miss is Collective Design’s display—for the first time in a public venue—of a 1960 Le Corbusier–designed tapestry, Les Dés Sont Jetés. This rare tapestry has been in the collection of architect Jørn Utzon, who as an early admirer of Corbu. Utzon commissioned Le Corbusier to design tapestries for the Sydney Opera House. It was at this time that Utzon bought the work for his private collection. It will be auctioned at Bruun Rasmussen Auctioneers in June in Denmark, making the 2015 fair a singular opportunity for the public to view the work. Collective Design’s 2015 fair will take place May 13–17 at Skylight Clarkson Sq, 550 Washington Street.
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Save the date! Here’s your first sneak peek of NYCxDESIGN 2015

We might be in the thick of winter, but planning is already underway for the third annual NYCxDESIGN coming up in the Spring. On Thursday morning, organizers—NYC & Company and the NYC Economic Development Corporation—invited members of the design community, fittingly, to the newly opened and revamped Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum to kick off the week-long, citywide design festivities taking place May 8–19. The program offers a platform to more than 40,000 designers and 3,900 design firms practicing in the city to showcase their work. Over the course of 12 days, a variety of exhibitions, installations, panel discussions, and open studios will be held in venues throughout Manhattan and Brooklyn. Six returning events anchor the program, including: BKLYN DESIGNS (May 8–10), WantedDesign Brooklyn (May 1–19), Collective Design (May 13–17), Frieze Art Fair (May 14–17), WantedDesign Manhattan (May 15–18), and ICFF (May 16–19). The opening night of BKLYN Designs will be the official launch of NYCxDESIGN. If last year's impressive turnout of 2,000-plus listings at 181 venues is telling, then May 2015 will be a busy one for those in the design sector.