Posts tagged with "Collage":

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Graham Foundation exhibit explores set design, collage, and architectural representation

The Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts’ spring exhibition Spaces without drama or surface is an illusion, but so is depth will examine the proliferation of collage in architectural representation, specifically in scenography and theatrical set design. The show has invited contemporary designers to rethink the relationship between theatricality and architecture, while drawing on historical references from 19th-century toy theaters through Aldo Rossi’s Little Scientific Theater. The show features the work of a wide range of architects and artists, including Argentinian architects Emilio Ambasz and Gerardo Caballero, Portuguese firm fala atelier, Brazilian architect Marcelo Ferraz, and British architect Sam Jacob, as well as American offices Johnston Marklee, MOS Architects, and Norman Kelley.

Other contributing architects include OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen, Cecilia Puga, Aldo Rossi, Taller de Arquitectura Mauricio Rocha + Gabriela Carrillo, and Pezo Von Ellrichshausen. Artists in the show include Pablo Bronstein, William Leavitt, Silke Otto-Knapp, Gabriel Sierra, Batia Suter, as well as dramaturge Jorge Palinhos. Spaces without drama or surface is an illusion, but so is depth is curated by the Mexico City–based LIGA, Space4Architecture, Ruth Estévez, and PRODUCTORA founder Wonne Ickx.

Spaces without drama or surface is an illusion, but so is depth The Graham Foundation Madlener House 4 West Burton Place, Chicago Through May 27, 2017

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Tigerman’s Epiphany: New photomontage update of “Titanic” unveiled at the Chicago Architecture Biennial

On October 22nd, marking the 130th anniversary of the Chicago Architecture Club and as part of the ongoing Chicago Architecture Foundation's Currencies of Architecture exhibition, Stanley Tigerman unveiled a follow up to his 1978 “Titanic” photomontage. Entitled “The Epiphany,” the new image, somewhat ironically, is a protest against what Tigerman sees as a contemporary infatuation with icons. The image itself depicts Mies Van Der Rohe’s Crown Hall and Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Bilbao sitting side-by-side on the lunar surface. From the same sky as the original “Titanic,” a bomb is falling to destroy them both. As with its predecessor, “The Epiphany” is less a critique of Van Der Rohe or Gehry, as much as it is of those that hold them and their work as the basis for their own work. “The problem with icon is that people use it as a starting point,” Tigerman explained to the crowd at the Chicago Architecture Foundation. “Instead of tabula rasa, a blank page. Inspiration is the emptiness of your page, or your blank computer screen.” “Architects need to teach, in some way,” Tigerman encouraged in the conversation around the unveiling, which was part of a larger event which included discussion of the state of the field and the current Chicago Architecture Biennial. Tigerman also took the time to express his pleasure with the current generation of young architects, and his ambition to hand off the field. “I am very pleased with the current generation. I feel good. I can go now.” "The Epiphany" and Currencies of Architecture can be seen for free at the Chicago Architecture Foundation.
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On View> MoMA presents “Cut ‘n’ Paste: From Architectural Assemblage to Collage City”

Cut ‘n’ Paste: From Architectural Assemblage to Collage City The Museum of Modern Art 11 West 53rd Street New York, NY Through December 1 Cut ‘n’ Paste: From Architectural Assemblage to Collage City, on view at The Museum of Modern Art from July 10 to December 1, examines the essential yet overlooked role of collage in architectural representation. The exhibition places Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s early photomontages next to the cut-and-pasted experiments of artists, photographers, and graphic designers. Together, these pieces suggest an immersive “collage city,” originally conceived by Colin Rowe and Fred Koetter in the 1970s, that becomes animated through superimposing various elements. Combining popular references and dynamic cultural connections, Cut ‘n’ Paste emphasizes early uses of collage to map out both its progression as an aesthetic technique crucial to architectural representation and as a cultural practice that constitutes the city. Pedro Gadanho curated the exhibit along with Phoebe Springstubb. In addition to works by Mies van der Rohe, featured artists include Ralph Schraivogel and Paul Citroen.
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Pictorial> Jim Kazanjian’s Victorian Apocalypse

Jim Kazanjian doesn't make photographs of buildings, he makes photographs into buildings. His assemblages of "found" structures create fantastic worlds that resemble the post-civilization wreckage of 19th century England.  Through the collapse of time and expansion of space, each collage tells an eerie story about making the familiar unfamiliar.   Kazanjian works as a CG artist for companies such as Nike, Adidas, NBC, CBS, HBO, NASA, HP, Intel, and others, but in his spare time, he uses these talents to create digital images that resemble early twentieth century analog stills.  Some compositions require up to 50 photographs, but none use a camera as part of the process. It is a haunting, timeless collection which he describes as "hyper-collage." While the results offer a glimpse into the artist's imagination, the process offers architects another weapon for exploration. By piecing together existing pictures into something so radically different, the artist has broken from the restraints of photography, and can create whatever he can imagine. It is a technique which holds much potential. Check out more collages on Jim Kazanjian's web site or purchase a limited edition print here.