Posts tagged with "Cold War":

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Striking architecture from the former Yugoslavia to go on view at MoMA

Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948-1980 is the first major exhibition in the United States to display the compelling portfolio of architecture from the former Yugoslavia. The exhibition will be on view at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) from July 15, 2018–January 13, 2019, and will include more than 400 visual documents from Yugoslavia’s prominent architects during the 45 years of the country’s existence. The architecture ranges from both soaring International Style skyscrapers and Brutalist structures of concrete geometric forms, representing the postwar style Yugoslavia’s architects developed in response to conflicting influences from both “the capitalist East and the socialist West,” according to a statement from the MoMA. Yugoslavia avoided the Cold War, instead became a leading figure in the Non-Aligned Movement in 1961. At the same time, the government built extensively in the hopes of modernizing and stimulating the economy to improve the lives of their citizens. The state also expanded its political influence in other Non-Aligned countries in Africa and the Middle East by building in and urbanizing those countries. Many memorials and monuments can be seen in the exhibition, showcasing Yugoslavia’s socialist ambition. Important architects such as Bogdan Bogdanović, Juraj Neidhardt, Svetlana Kana Radević, Edvard Ravnikar, Vjenceslav Richter, and Milica Šterić are featured in the exhibition. Check out this link for further details.
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Museum of Design Atlanta exhibit tracks design-as-propaganda during the Cold War

At the height of the Cold War, the phrase “winning hearts and minds” was used to promote America’s cultural and political sensibility abroad. The spirit of that era is captured in Make-Believe America: U.S. Cultural Exhibitions in the Cold War, where curator Andrew Wulf reveals how designers and politicians used the International Trade Fair as a theater for ideological propaganda. The exhibition contains artifacts, graphics, and film footage from different World’s Fairs to illustrate America’s efforts to stop communism.

At one exhibition, a geodesic dome designed by R. Buckminster Fuller encases a gray spaceship station, with star-spangled parachutes and paper planes hanging from the ceiling. In another exhibition, dangling astronauts surround a stained capsule designed by David Brody—a pointed reference to Neil Armstrong’s conquests on the moon. Overall the show presents the public with an opportunity to look into a period in history dominated by fear, optimism, and innovation.

Make-Believe America: U.S. Cultural Exhibitions in the Cold War will be at the Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA), 1315 Peachtree St. Atlanta, Georgia, from until June 12, 2016.

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On View> “Irreversible” Exhibition by Los Carpinteros Explores Soviet-Era Architecture

Irreversible Sean Kelly Gallery New York Through June 22 There is a renewed interest in the west of Soviet modern architecture from the Cold War and its strong and determined sculptural form. Much of the work was barely known in the west—at least in this country—and has come as a revelation to scholars and critics. A recent exhibition Soviet Modernism 1955-1991 at the Architekturzentrum in Vienna and a fascinating exhibit Cold War Cool Digital at Pratt Institute featured Soviet designed pre-fabricated and globally distributed Cold War Era housing systems. Both of these exhibits featured the ambitious and determined socialist realism that one would expect from work of this period, but now an exhibition, Irreversible, at the Sean Kelly Gallery by the Havana- and Madrid-based group Los Carpinteros features work that expresses what it felt like to be the receiver of these Soviet-inspired architectural and sculptural forms and their realist messages. The artists are showing large, brightly colored objects inspired by Russian and Yugoslavian sculptures that simultaneously revel in their dramatic form but also the feeling of unease they evoked for Cubans. In order to obfuscate the potentially fraught political connotations of the work. Los Carpenters made them of their own versions of LEGO children's blocks. The results are convincing and powerful in their own right and monuments of a new generation of Cuban artists. The show is on at Sean Kelly through June 22 and features other work by the young Carpinteros.