Posts tagged with "Coffee Shops":

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World’s largest Starbucks to open in Downtown Chicago

Much to the delight of tired downtown Chicago architects in need of caffeination, Starbucks has announced plans to open a Starbucks Reserve Roastery in Chicago in 2019. Starbucks describes the mega-coffee house as “a fully sensorial coffee environment dedicated to roasting, brewing and packaging its rare, small-batch Starbucks Reserve coffees from around the world.” The roastery will be located in the heart of Chicago’s Magnificent Mile, along Michigan Avenue, in what is currently a flagship Crate & Barrel store. At four stories and 43,000 feet, it will be the largest Starbucks in the world. The Chicago Tribune has reported that the Crate & Barrel store is expected to close in early 2018 to make way for the caffeinated coffee compound. The Roastery will also include a working bakery and rooftop terrace. The Chicago roastery will be part of a larger move by Starbucks to open 20 to 30 similar projects around the world. The roasteries will supply the company’s Reserve Stores, which are set to open up to 1,000 new locations in the coming years. Chicago currently has three of the upscale Reserve Stores, with another planned for the West Loop neighborhood.
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Iconic architecture plays off of updated decor in the Met Breuer’s Flora Bar and Flora Coffee

At the end of 2015, restaurateur Thomas Carter and chef Ignacio Mattos, the duo behind Matter House, were tapped to create the new restaurant and coffee shop at the Met Breuer in collaboration Beyer Blinder Belle, the architects that led the building’s overall renovation. Carter and Mattos previously created trendy downtown restaurants Estela and Café Altro Paradiso, and Thomas P. Campbell, the director and CEO of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, hoped that the pair would bring the same kind of hip ambience to the stately Brutalist Upper East Side building that now houses the modern and contemporary branch of the museum. With the opening of Flora Bar and Flora Coffee, the Met Breuer’s reinvention takes another step forward.

Flora Bar is open to the public without a ticket and is located one level below the sidewalk with a seating capacity of 74. Throughout the space, iconic elements play off of updated, modern decor. For example, an ample wood-and-marble bar and custom stools by Brooklyn-based designer Steven Bukowski complement the original concrete walls and columns, while the ceiling, with Marcel Breuer’s original disc-shaped lights, is mirrored by the circular Mountain White Danby marble tables. Flora Bar will maintain separate hours from the museum and will be accessible through the main entrance even when the museum is closed. 

Flora Bar and Flora Coffee 945 Madison Avenue, New York, NY Tel: 646-558-5383 Designers: Beyer Blinder Belle with Matter House

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Design, Bitches creates new “coffee classroom” in L.A. for Counter Culture Coffee

Design, Bitches has designed a new “coffee classroom” in Los Angeles for North Carolina–based Counter Culture Coffee’s growing list of national outposts.

The classroom occupies a repurposed Streamline Moderne structure just off Sunset Boulevard and is designed in plan as a tripartite demonstration kitchen. Espresso and brewed coffee facilities are separated by a thickened and stepped storage wall clad in translucent teal corrugated polycarbonate. Sections of the wall can be pulled out to create storage bins and seating. The coffee classroom on the other side of this wall opens out onto a small patio that contains a wooden amphitheater. The corrugated paneling also clads the risers of the amphitheater, which is peppered with small planters containing succulents.

Though the classroom is not a coffee shop per se, the space is open every Friday at 10:00 a.m. for public coffee tastings.

Counter Culture Training Center 1601 Griffith Park Blvd. Silver Lake, CA Tel: 323-919-7859

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Futuristic coffee shop, Voyager Espresso, opens in New York’s Financial District

Voyager Espresso, a 550-square-foot coffee bar, brings the perks of artisanal coffee to New York’s perpetually caffeine craving Financial District in the new Fulton Center. The bar opened in January and was crafted by New York–based design practice Only If, a team of five architects and designers founded in 2013. The clients, a pair of Australians, wanted the space to look distinctly different from the ubiquitous white tile, reclaimed wood, and Edison bulb coffee shop aesthetic and had ambitious plans despite their tight budget. With this in mind, Adam Frampton, principal at Only If, opted for an “inexpensive but futuristic” material palette of aluminum enamel painted oriented strand board, black marble, perforated aluminum and copper, and black rubber. “In such a small and constrained space, our first intuition was to be very pragmatic with the layout and articulate the design through the materials and details. However, we didn’t want to simply decorate the space,” Frampton said. “It soon became apparent that a more figural gesture—albeit less efficient in terms of quantity of seating—improved ergonomics within the service area and produced a greater identity and hierarchy.” Frampton also devised a layout based on two circles: The positive volume, a barista station, allows two baristas to work simultaneously and a negative volume, the "grotto," a seating space carved out of the surrounding walls. Frampton and his team worked through many iterations before landing on this clever configuration. “The method of exhausting all possibilities until the best fit emerges is probably something that came from my experience working at OMA,” said Frampton. “What’s really interesting about the layout is how it activates different social settings and creates different types of seating.” The careful planning paid off: After seven weeks of preparing the design and obtaining the correct permit, drawing, and construction documents, the space was built in about eight weeks. It is now open Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 110 William Street through the John Street subway entrance.
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Portland designers crafted this tea-toned tea shop in Miami to feature an inviting lounge-meets-café interior

Miami’s caffeine junkies have a new, chic watering hole to haunt. Small Tea, whose neutral brown and tan–toned interior begets the perfect cuppa, was designed by Portland, OR–based Osmose Design. The store, café, and retreat serves 84 tea varieties, and its material palette is inspired by tea-making implements.

The canopy overhead is made of 1,250 boxes wrapped in woven abaca, a natural fiber typical of the baskets used to harvest tea leaves, and was designed by Osmose and installed by Goldenwood in Miami. Their patterning allegedly reflects the Small Tea logo and creates a play of shadows on the polished concrete flooring.

The upholstery for the Lievore Altherr Molina lounge chairs, too, is sheathed in abaca cloth. In keeping with the tea-drinking theme, a ceiling-mounted LED light fixture in the corner by Portland’s Pigeon Toe Ceramics features a cascade of custom-made ceramic teacups in which each light bulb nests. "The truth is, we think coffee could really use a cup of tea right now," Small Tea's brand manifesto reads, before proceeding to define itself as: "A place where you can let life steep a little and find some distance from the rattle and hum." A sleek, oak-clad, oval-shaped island in the center of the store called the “Scent Station” allows non-connoisseurs to explore tea aromas and blends. Wall shelving displays handmade copper tins for tea-tenders to dispense the blends, while unique staggered-corner shelves hold an array of potted plants. In conceptualizing the 40,000 square-foot space located in Coral Gables, Osmose design principal Andee Hess “steeped” herself in the art of tea harvesting, the history and corresponding patterning.