Posts tagged with "CO Architects":

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2016 Best of Design Award for Unbuilt > In the Drawers: University of Miami Student Housing Master Plan, Phase 1

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it’s grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you. 2016 Best of Design Award for Unbuilt > In the Drawers: University of Miami Student Housing Master Plan, Phase 1 Architect: CO Architects Location: Coral Gables, FL

Using the home as the building block, CO Architects’ scheme for the University of Miami transforms the notion of dormitory life: Presenting multiple scales of social environments, each three-story home juxtaposes private with semi-private elements. Larger units lift from the ground to allow for passageways and program spaces beneath.

Honorable Mention, Unbuilt > In the Drawers: LaGuardia Airport Master Plan

Architect: SHoP Architects Location: Queens, NY

Selected as a finalist for the 2014 Master Plan Design Competition launched by Governor Andrew Cuomo and Vice President Joe Biden, the proposal responds to LaGuardia’s history of delays due to tarmac crowding by creating a two-island concourse that improves operations, offers a unified environment, and creates an appropriate gateway to New York City.

Honorable Mention, Unbuilt > In the Drawers: WWI Memorial: Path of the Americans

Architect: DXA studio Location: Washington, D.C.

Shining like stars, 116,516 points of light beaming from concrete walls, at once shed light on the memory of Americans lost in World War I and—alongside a central reflecting pool—serve as a metaphor for healing, resilience, and recovery.

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AN’s 2016 Facades+ conference series kicks off in Los Angeles

“We don’t need walls anymore.  We need living, breathing systems that provide so much more to the urban realm than keeping in conditioned air and keeping out noise and pollutants.” - Will Wright, AIA|LA

Los Angeles’ 2016 Facades+ Conference, presented by The Architect’s Newspaper, is the 18th event in an ongoing series of conferences and forums that have unfolded in cities across the nation, including New York City, Miami, San Francisco, Dallas, Houston, Seattle, D.C., and Chicago. Held at the L.A. Hotel Downtown, the conference incorporated architects, engineers, fabricators, and innovative material manufacturers into a multidisciplinary two-day event covering the state of building envelope design thinking today. The daylong symposium kicked off with spirited remarks by Will Wright, Director of Government & Public Affairs at AIA L.A., where he set forth a plea for stronger emphasis on localism and craftsmanship. Co-chaired by Kevin Kavanagh and Alex Korter of CO Architects, the event included AIA LA, four local architecture schools – UCLA, USC, Woodbury, and Cal Poly Pomona – and a robust collection of Los Angeles-based architecture firms. Four panel discussions throughout the day covered the influence of building envelopes on business, education, structural design, and data analysis. The conversations engaged audience participation through an interactive, web-based tool called Sli.do. In a morning panel discussion titled “Money Well Spent? An Owner’s Perspective on the Value of Facades,” moderator Kevin Kavanagh spoke with representatives from Kaiser Permanente, Kitchell, and The Ratkovich Company on finding the right balance between aesthetics, energy performance, fiscal responsibility, and efficient project scheduling. During breaks, conference attendees attended a “Methods+Materials” gallery that highlighted innovative building envelope materials such as electrochromic glass, metal mesh fabric with integrated media display, and ultra-compact surfacing products. The symposium was highlighted by keynote addresses from Enrique Norten and Eric Owen Moss.
  • Presented by The Architect's Newspaper
  • 2016 Conference Chair YKK AP America
  • Gold Sponsors GKD Metal Fabrics View Dynamic Glass
  • Methods+Materials Gallery 3M, Agnora, Akzo Nobel, Boston Valley Terra Cotta, Cambridge Architectural, CE|Strong, Consolidated Glass Holdings, Cosentino, CRL-U.S. Aluminum, Elward, Giroux Glass, Glasswerks, Guardian, Kawneer, Nichiha, Ollin Stone, POHL Group, Porcelanosa, PPG IdeaScapes, Prodema, Rigidized Metals, Roxul, Sapa, Schüco, Sedak, Sika, STI, Terracore, Tremco, UL, UltraGlas, Vitrocsa, and Walter P Moore
Norten’s opening keynote set forth an argument for a socially responsible architecture integrated into the city via infrastructural, landscape, and public space projects. He cited works of his firm, TEN Arquitectos, which incorporate topographical manipulations of the landscape to establish social spaces of public engagement. His work intentionally camouflages the building envelope into a contextual landscape—be it an adjacent park or cityscape—to dissolve the separation between public and private. Eric Owen Moss spoke in the afternoon, questioning at what point the conceptual content of a project becomes lost amidst constructional realities. Through recent work of his firm, Eric Owen Moss Architects, he focused on building envelope details that strayed from original design intent, transforming in concept and tectonics as engineers, fabricators, and contractors participated in the process. In a panel discussion titled “Bytes, Dollars, EUI: Data Streams and Envelopes,” Moderator William Menking, Founder and Editor-in-Chief of The Architect’s Newspaper, spoke with Atelier 10, Gehry Technologies, and CPG regarding tools and processes facilitating facade analysis and optimization. Sameer Kashyap (Gehry Technologies) shared perhaps the most bewildering stat of the day—that GT was able to script processes which allowed two people to produce over 1200 shop drawings per day for 33 weeks in the coordination of a highly complex facade system. Paul Zajfen of CO Architects rounded out the day with a presentation titled “Facades: A Manifestation of Client, Culture, Climate,” where he argued for contextually specific design producing a facade that “would not be possible at any other time—and in no other place.” The symposium was followed on day two with a series of “dialog” and “lab” workshops covering net-zero facade systems, digital fabrication processes, curtain wall design, and advanced facade analysis. A full roster of organizers and sponsors can be found on the conference website. The Los Angeles event was the first in 2016 of a seven-city lineup, and will be followed by a Facades+AM morning forum in Washington, D.C., on March 10th. The next two-day conference will take place in New York City April 21st and 22nd.
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Conference co-chairs preview Facades+ Los Angeles 2016

Facades+ Los Angeles co-chairs Kevin Kavanagh and Alexander Korter hope to shake things up when the acclaimed conference series returns to Southern California in January. Senior associate and associate principal, respectively, at CO Architects, Kavanagh and Korter have rethought the event in terms of architecture as process—a theme that also captures their personal approach to design. "Architecture is about managing and manipulating various drivers and influencers in order to enhance and inform design inspiration," explained Kavanagh. "It's a creative discipline, but a lot of the external drivers—cost, quality, owners' preferences—are as much a part of the design process. They shouldn't be looked at as restrictions, but are ultimately things to work off, that will make [the design] better." In other words, said Korter, Facades+ LA's content will revolve around "bringing process into [architecture], bringing performance into it as an equal partner in designing good, long-term sustainable buildings." The structure of the event reflects this approach. For the day-long symposium, Kavanagh and Korter worked to balance keynote presentations—which Korter characterizes as "more inspirational, design-driven in traditional terms"—with panels—to be "much more discussion-based, topic-based, and maybe less about case studies." Questions posed to and by the panelists may include, for instance, how owners view high-performance facades, and how best to make full and good use of available data streams. "The presentations look backwards, because they're about work that's been accomplished," added Kavanagh. "With the panels, we're asking, 'What's next?' We're taking it out of design and asking, 'What should facades do?'" "If the presentations are an inspiration and the panels are about areas of interest—very specific points of view—then the workshops are all about implementation," explained Kavanagh. "The ideal is that the attendees get something very concrete that they can take right into their day-to-day practice." The workshop offerings on day 2 of Facades+ LA will include deep dives into subjects including commissioning; what role facades play in boosting environmental performance; narratives of project execution; and the development of low-cost, high-performance curtain wall systems. Kavanagh and Korter quip that their relaxed yet dynamic approach to architecture (and conference planning) may not immediately appeal to Type-A AEC industry professionals. But in the end, they remain convinced that a fresh take will benefit all Facades+ LA participants, from architects to fabricators, builders, engineers, building owners, and academics. "Hopefully there is a little bit of chaos that will make it more fun, a little looser," said Kavanagh. For more information on Facades+ LA, visit the conference website. Check back often for up-to-date information on the symposium agenda and workshop offerings.
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Net Zero and the Future of Facade Design

Though sustainability remains a primary goal for many AEC industry professionals, its definition is increasingly up for debate. Tried-and-true energy efficiency standards such as LEED and Energy Star are facing competition from other rubrics, including net zero. "LEED was the sustainability measure," said CO Architects' Alex Korter. "It's good, but people looked at it more as a certification. With net zero, you're setting hard performance goals." With his colleague Kevin Kavanagh, Korter will lead a panel on "Net Zero and the Future Facade" at Facades+ LA next week. Korter, Kavanagh, and the panelists—who include ARUP's Russell Fortmeyer, Atelier 10's Emilie Hagen, and Stephane Hoffman from Morrison Hershfield—will dig in to the what and why of net zero, and ask how facade designers and builders can push the envelope on environmental performance. Both Korter and Kavanagh see room for improvement in terms of how facade designers and fabricators address sustainability. "Something that we've talked about—and something that will get us in a bit of trouble—is that we don't think the envelope world has done well in terms of upping performance," said Korter. Part of the problem is the focus on checking boxes for energy certifications, rather than setting concrete goals. Even in the world of net zero, said Kavanagh, "the facade is often looked at as an insulating layer, and is relegated to a high-performance insulating component. Our argument is that if you want to maximize net zero, architects and developers really need to rethink their approach to building. Why are facades trying to get as thin as possible? It makes sense for an Apple Store, but for other buildings, why not a two-foot-thick facade with [integrated mechanicals]?" The logical extension of the critique posed by Korter and Kavanagh is, as Kavanagh put it, "Is it possible for a facade to make a building net zero?" But to get there, the two say, designers and fabricators will need a push as well as a pull. "The way this is really going to happen is that the code tells you to, or the building owner—the person who pays the bill—starts to make it their number one priority," said Korter. "Those are the two ways. We've been dancing in this nebulous time: We could do it, but do we really have to?" Hear more from facades experts on net zero and other pressing issues next week at Facades+ LA. To learn more and register, visit the conference website.
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Shortlist Specials: West Coast Projects Name Names

As the economy continues to roll we’re again awash in shortlists and competition wins. The Santa Monica City Services Building has a shortlist that includes SOM and Frederick Fisher. Teams shortlisted for the Herald Examiner Building include Christof Jantzen and Brenda Levin. LA’s Wildwood School shortlist includes Gensler, Koning Eizenberg, and one unknown team. The UC San Diego Biological Building has gone to CO Architects (recent winners of the AIACC Firm of the Year award). EHDD has won the Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific, and Harley Ellis Devereaux has won the Long Beach Belmont Plaza Pool.
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Sonoran Desert Vernacular by CO Architects

Red-rock mountains and the saguaro cactus inspired the Health Sciences Education Building's rippling copper facade.

Downtown Phoenix, observed CO Architects’ Arnold Swanborn, looks a lot like downtown Minneapolis. That feels wrong, given the two cities’ contrasting environments. So when it came to designing the Health Sciences Education Building (HSEB) at Phoenix Biomedical Campus (which won honorable mention for facades in AN’s Best of Design Awards), CO Architects went back to nature—to the Sonoran Desert in particular. “We’re building in a desert. We really, in the outset, wanted to understand what it’s like to build in a desert environment, to really go back and investigate the people who first moved there, or even some of the [American] Indians who lived [there],” said Swanborn. “The skin is really a response to some of the lessons we learned from going out to the desert, being out there and seeing how plants and animals adapted to that environment.” HSEB’s undulating envelope, comprising 5,972 copper panels and more than 10,000 copper parts, echoes two of the defining features of the Arizona desert. First is the omnipresent saguaro cactus, which evolved a folded skin as a self-shading structure. Second is the layered soil of the nearby mountains. “[T]he [building’s] skin folds in a way that’s similar to the saguaro cactus,” explained Swanborn. “How we emulate the mountains beyond is by creating a shadow pattern by folding and articulating the metal panels.” Copper was a natural choice for the exterior cladding. HSEB went up during the recession, said Swanborn, “when everyone was very sensitive to making sure everything was local.” Copper is one of Arizona’s “five C’s”: copper, cattle, cotton, citrus, and climate. In addition, copper is highly conductive, meaning it responds quickly to the region’s aggressive swings in temperature. “Because it’s a rain screen technology we innovated into a sunscreen, there’s a space between the copper skin and building envelope,” said Swanborn. “There’s a 2 ½- or 3-inch air cavity that essentially acts as a chimney. The air gets superheated, and it essentially creates a vertical convection effect, which wicks heat away from the building.” On a 100-degree day, the copper skin keeps the interior a (relatively) cool 70. Finally, copper ages well. “Over time it patinas beautifully,” said Swanborn. “It’s easy to take care of; it kind of takes care of itself.”
  • Facade Manufacturer Kovach Building Enclosures
  • Architects CO Architects, Ayers Saint Gross (Associate Architect)
  • Consultants Transsolar (Climate Engineering)
  • Location Phoenix
  • Date of Completion 2012
  • System copper rain screen with sunshades and PTFE canopy
  • Products Kovach Building Enclosures custom copper panels and sunshades, Trenwyth Industries (Oldcastle) Trendstone ground face masonry units, Viracon VNE1-63 glass
Phoenix’s climate informed every aspect of the exterior design, starting with the massing. CO Architects worked with Transsolar to determine a shape that would maximize shading. The building is arranged around a narrow courtyard running from east to west, which the architects modeled on the Sonoran desert’s slot canyons. The courtyard is topped with a polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE) shading structure, which “allows daylight to filter through—sort of like a big lightbulb,” said Swanborn. “It filters, diffuses, and bounces off the interior’s light-colored walls.” The courtyard walls are faced in Trendstone ground face masonry units by Trenwyth, a light block rain screen used as a veneer. The courtyard helps bring light to HSEB’s east and west faces, which CO Architects left windowless in order to reduce thermal gain. On the south side of the building, they installed cantilevered copper sunshades over the windows. Vertical copper fins on the north elevation shade occupants from the rising and setting sun. Like the building’s copper cladding, the sunshades and fins were fabricated by Kovach. To open the ground floor on the west end of the building to the adjacent campus green, CO Architects took a cue from early desert dwellers. “When the [American Indians] first settled, they built underneath these carved rock formations, which again becomes self-shading,” Swanborn. The ground floor is glazed, but set back under the building to reduce direct exposure to the sun. Swanborn relished the challenge the joint University of Arizona/Northern Arizona University project provided. “To me the story’s really about the idea of creating a new urban vernacular for the desert,” he said. “The more restricted things become, [the more] architects have to become inventive. The skin of the building is really a pointer to that: it’s inventive, it’s innovative. I think it’s very fitting for that area.”
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Innovative Technologies & the Facade Building Process: Two “Can’t Miss” Workshops at facades+ on 7/12!

This year's facades+ PERFORMANCE conference features an exciting line-up of Dialog Workshops. Here are two that you won't want to miss! On paper, the steps involved in creating and delivering a high-performance building facade seem relatively simple. In reality, unforeseen changes in cost and scheduling often complicate the process and hinder it’s timely completion. At our facades+ PERFORMANCE Conference in San Francisco on July 12th, Alex Korter and Kevin Kavanagh from CO Architects, winners of the 2013 BIM Awards, will present the “Breaking Facades: Why Process is Often More Important Than Materiality” Dialog Workshop. Through a step by step analysis, the pair will explore the process of creating and delivering a high-performance building facade, from beginning to end. By participating in this morning workshop registered architects will earn 4 LU AIA CE credits! Don’t miss this opportunity to learn helpful tips in dodging obstacles and successfully navigating the creation and delivery of the intelligent facade from leading industry experts. In order for architects and engineers to remain on the cutting-edge of technology they must incorporate innovative design technologies and materials into their high-performance facades. The "Intelligence Facades” afternoon Dialog Workshop will be coordinated by Brent Vander Werf of Tripyramid Structures, who has carefully selected a team of leading architects and engineers including Jason Vollen of The Center for Architecture Science and Ecology (CASE), Benjamin Hall of benjamin hall design+build, Francis O’Neill of Colt Shading, and Anthony E. Birchler of Zahner to lead to this stimulating workshop dialogue. Through case studies and demonstrations they will explore novel technologies, from bi-laminated materials to light sensing components, with the goal of quantifying performance metrics and calculating the impact that adaptive facades have on contemporary designs. By participating in this workshop attendees will not only get the chance to learn directly from renowned professionals but they will also earn 4 LU/HSW AIA CE credits. Learn more about our workshops and register for our facades+ conference here!
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Fentress, CO Architects Recognized at 2013 BIM Awards

The AIA Technology in Architectural Practice (TAP), in association with BIM Forum, The Construction Owners Association of America (COAA), and the International Facility Management Association (IFMA) have announced the winners of the 9th Annual Building Information Modeling (BIM) Awards which recognize the firms who best utilize BIM technology. Out of 16 submissions the jury selected two winners and three honorable mentions. CO Architects took home the "Stellar architecture using BIM" prize for their work on the Health Sciences Education Building, Phoenix Biomedical Campus (pictured above). According to a press release the project showed "an exceptional understanding of universal BIM usage, team integration, and requirements for successful implementation from programming to as built." Fentress Architects and Mortensen Construction were recognized for the Ralph L. Carr Colorado Judicial Center in Denver and  were awarded the "Delivery Process Innovation" prize. According to the press release the project exhibited "impressive statements of advanced levels of detailing in BIM, coordination, and cooperation." Honorable mentions were given to The Miller Hull Partnership for their design of the San Ysidro Land Port of Entry in Seattle, Collins Woerman and GLY Construction for the Puyallup Medical Center, Group Health Cooperative in Washington, and the University of Cincinnati their curriculum deveopment program titled "Building Relationships, University of Cincinnati College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning." The jury comprised of RK Stewart, the 2007 AIA president and current chairman of National Institute of Building Sciences board of directors; Harry McKinney, virtual design construction manager at Clancy & Theys Construction Co.; Tom Sawyer, senior editor at Engineering News-Record; Dennis Shelden, chief technology officer at Gehry Technologies; and Eric Teicholz, president and CEO at Graphic Systems.
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Dissecting Natural Design at the LA Natural History Museum

On Saturday I moderated one of two AIA/LA-sponsored panels about bio-inspired design at the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum. The first panel looked at the general influence of nature on design, from the Mars Rover to the San Diego Zoo, and ours zeroed in on architecture's envelopes and skins, with insights about breaking away from the static, heavy, and largely-unresponsive architecture of today by architect Tom Wiscombe, Arup engineer Russell Fortmeyer, and evolutionary biologist Shauna Price. Speaking of bio-inspired design, before the panel I got an early look at the new gardens at the Natural History Museum, designed by Mia Lehrer + Associates. The gardens, which are scheduled to open in time for the museum's centennial this June, are designed to finally bring the institution's exhibits outside of their built home, with diverse elements that are laid out as a microcosm of LA's ecosystems. That includes plant species that draw all types of animals and insects, jagged rock formations, and even a recreation of the local water system, with a pond that flows into a stream, and eventually becomes an arroyo. The design creatively mixes natural and urban materials like a chain link vine arbor and rebar rose supports. There's even an on-site natural laboratory, so scientists can work in open daylight instead of in a sequestered chamber.We'll be looking at the gardens more closely in the coming weeks when they officially open, along with the glassy new entry to the museum by CO Architects, which is coming this summer.