Posts tagged with "Clothing":

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Zaha Hadid Design fashions women’s activewear collection

Zaha Hadid Design (ZHD) created a women's activewear line in collaboration with Odlo, a Swiss sportswear company. The collection includes black tights, a black bralette, and a translucent gray parka. The pieces feature some signature ZHD elements—think swooping curves and patterns that morph in a gradient field—but little of the spectacular formal gyrations of the firm's most well-known buildings. In many ways, the clothing resembles monotone mesh high-end activewear available from a variety of retailers. ZHD is no stranger to a partnership. Last fall the firm collaborated with Odlo on a line of exercise shirts, with Royal Thai on a line of rugs, and with ETH on a concrete pavilion. The designs, available for sale online in Europe, range from £50.00 for the bralette to £130.00 for the parka.

69: Déjà Vu

Lifestyle brand 69 is the brainchild of an anonymous Los Angeles–based designer whose non-gender and non-demographic-specific clothing exuberantly suggests ideas of freedom, inclusivity, and a more fluid future. Since its founding in 2011, 69 has developed a cult following for its playful and exaggerated designs. With a strong focus on transforming denim, a typically utilitarian everyday fabric, into deeply elegant garments that resist easy categorization, 69 welcomes people of all ages, races, sexualities, and sizes into its community. For its first museum solo exhibition, 69 presents a survey of its groundbreaking clothing along with a selection of irreverent and inventive videos and photographs that blur the line between promotional material and artwork.
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Storefront’s Critical Halloween to explore the idea of “DEMO” at a historic Lower Manhattan firehouse

This October, the Storefront for Art and Architecture will host its annual Critical Halloween party in tandem with its ever-fascinating costume competition. The event will be held at the historic DCTV firehouse and engine bay in Lower Manhattan and will have a "DEMO" theme, with a prize for the best costume. Critical Halloween is a place to party, engage in intellectual debate, dress up in the most outlandish way possible, acting as a "space for expression of radical thought." During its tenure the event has quickly become the scene and welcome excuse for many to meet up, dance, talk and engage in one of the most celebratory nights of the year. This time the event is running the theme "DEMO"—a term that has multiple uses, being an abbreviate, prefix, verb and a noun. Hence, "DEMO" is the theme of dress partygoers are invited explore and examine ideas pertaining to contemporary issues and discourses in art, architecture and design focusing on those in need of a "dose of DEMO." From acts of collective will (DEMOnstration) to institutional erasure (DEMOlition), the notion of DEMO is one that penetrates many aspects of our contemporary society and that often inspires trepidation among those who produce culture. Tickets are $50, being found here and doors open at 9:00 p.m. on Saturday, October 31.

As for the prizes, awards will go to the following categories:

  • Best Overall Costume
  • Best Group Costume
  • Best Individual Costume
  • Best Duo/Couple Costume
  • Special Prize for Best Demolition Costume
  • Special Prize for Best Demonstration Costume
  • Special Prize for Best Democracy Costume

DEMOcratic Peoples Choice Award: Storefront will partner with Hyperallergic to host a Democratic People’s Choice Award. During the week following the event, online audiences will be able to vote on for their favorite Critical Halloween costume through Hyperallergic.

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Israeli fashion student Danit Peleg creates the world’s first 3D-printed ready-to-wear collection

Genius starts small: The world’s first 3D-printed fashion collection was created in the bedroom of a soon-to-be college grad. Starting with a less than rudimentary grasp of 3D printing, Israeli fashion student Danit Peleg rendered an entire ready-to-wear collection, initially feeding polyactic acid plastics (PLA) into a desktop 3D printer. However, the material proved brittle and inflexible, and for the next nine months Peleg cast around for an alternative. She then discovered FilaFlex, a strong and flexible plastic, with which she printed her first piece: a triangular-latticed red jacket called ‘Liberté,’ (the word is woven into the design) which was inspired by the painting ‘Liberty Leading the People’ by Eugène Delacroix. “I modified [the painting] so it would look like a 3D picture. I was inspired to work with the many triangles present in the painting’s composition,” Peleg wrote on her website. For this piece, she used 3D rendering software called Blender. Subsequently, Peleg began to experiment with an array of materials and printers, happening upon Andreas Bastian’s Mesostructured Cellular Materials, a synclastic material with snowflake-like patterning. She then enlisted the help of 3D printing experts TechFactoryPlus and XLN to acquire different printers and go all nine yards on her vision, which she would present for her graduate collection required to obtain her fashion degree from Shenkar College of Engineering and Design in Israel. It took 2,000 hours to print the collection using her Witbox FDM desktop 3D printer and flexible FilaFlex filaments. “I wanted to create a ready-to-wear collection printed entirely at home using printers that anyone can get,” said Peleg. Each A4-sized textile sheet took at least 20 hours to print, and each dress an average of 4,000 hours. The lace-like geometric detailing of each dress is strikingly three-dimensional, so that the dresses “have a topography and aren’t just flat textiles.” Peleg wanted her models to walk the runway in head-to-toe 3D prints, so she printed fire engine-red high-heeled shoes inspired by designer Michele Badia. Although ecstatic about the design potential she has unearthed, Peleg concedes that 3D-printed fashion is still conceptual. “I don’t think that people mostly would like to wear rubber for daily life,” she told the Times of Israel. “But I’m sure these structures will look much nicer if we can do it from cotton. In a few years, the material that we can put into the machines will be polyester maybe, and then it will feel better.”