Posts tagged with "cityscape":

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Love your city? These rings let you wear your favorite skyline on your finger

Ola Shekhtman, a Serbian goldsmith trained in St. Petersburg, makes rings of iconic cityscapes. Shekhtman forms the rings by hand, melting, rolling, sawing, and soldering the metal into architectural figures from renown cities. Her collection includes London, Paris, New York, Berlin, Washington D.C., Charleston, Boston, Hong Kong, San Francisco, Amsterdam, Stockholm, and Edinburgh. Four Ola Shekhtman Cityscape Rings. (Courtesy Ola Shekhtman) The Serbian goldsmith developed her craft in 2011, studying in jewelry school in St. Petersburg, Russia and has moved to a different city each year. Her constant departure from cities inspired her collection. "Do you buy a single cup of coffee and sit at a Starbucks for an insane amount of time daydreaming of Paris? Do you miss London when none of your friends want to grab a pint on a Tuesday? Do you yearn for New York when you smell the faint scent of urine first thing in the morning? Here's something that'll make you light up like a city skyline at night," said the Huffington Post on Shekhtman's cityscape rings.  The Serbian goldsmith's Instagram page exhibits her rings accompanying her on her various travels. "Amsterdam says Shalom from the bay of the DeadSea, Israel," Shekhtman captioned the image above on Instagram. Seattle and Chicago are Shekhtman's most common requests and should be the next cityscapes added to her collection. For more information on Ola Shekhtman's handcrafted cityscape rings, check out her Etsy page here.
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Not a car in the world: Nashville neighborhood abstains from use of cars for a whole week

While major cities in Europe and across the world are experimenting with the car-free lifestyle, the American South is not likely on anyone's radar as the next to embrace the trend. A neighborhood in Nashville, Tennessee, however, has promised to not use cars for an entire week, leaving them at home as part of the "Don't Car Campaign."

Having started on September 19, 30 participants will go carless until the 25th. “Parking has been a big issue here,” said Jamie Brown, a member of the Nations Neighborhood Association (NNA) board speaking to the Nashville Business Journal. “The residential density is getting higher. One [house] goes down and two or three go up,” she said. “Now we’re starting to see condominium and apartment units." Elaborating on the parking difficulties in the area Brown went on to say: “We’re worried about how [new development] is going to affect our overflow parking in the street. We don’t have sidewalks in our neighborhood. The developers keep telling us this is a walkable neighborhood, saying it’s close to downtown. … We wanted to test that concept.” The NNA campaign to go car-less highlights the outdated transit system currently in place, adjudged by the Nashville MTA as insufficient for the growing local population. The city, according to the Nashville Business Journal, is fortunate in that it is walkable and pedestrian-friendly with plenty of bike lanes. Abstaining from car usage then shouldn't be that much of an issue. “People in other neighborhoods have reached out and told us this is a great idea,” Brown said. “We hope the campaign could be done by other neighborhoods.” The team of 30 who will record and document their experiences seeks to be a leading example of how a population can get by without being dependent on cars. They also want people to start seeing how capable their transportation infrastructure really is.