Posts tagged with "Cinema":

Open Call: 2A City Architecture Movie Awards 2020

We celebrate movies demonstrating ancient, contemporary, and modern architecture, representing a blend of talent, idea, vision, as well as commitment. The 2A City – Architecture Movie Awards provide critics, theorists, and architectural philosophers with a new median for architectural expression as well as a discussion. At the 2ACAMA, we believe that movies present a contemporary way to understand and envision space. The ultimate motive behind bringing the two Arts of Architecture and Cinema together lies in a deep standpoint. This viewpoint states that movies are a play of expressions and sequence of events. On the other hand, Architecture is a powerful and enduring identity that speaks for itself using built structures. Both share a relationship that goes a long way and is both shallow and intense. 2A City – Architecture Movie Awards – The Vision It is not easy to imagine cinema and movies taking place in a vacuum. Architecture is the panorama of films and cinema. Landscapes, houses, and cities comprise of the frames where filmmakers take account of people, lives, thoughts, and feelings. Their relationship, and in some cases, the results of this fusion are surprising – beyond doubt. The architecture in the movies comes out as a backdrop of the scene or as a framework of the action. But it doesn’t just serve as a background to frame a film. It plays an enormous role in setting the disposition, the story, as well as the unseen shades in the movie. Specific environments give rise to certain feelings, as well as meanings. Even though not said through words, the visual spur of space makes us visualize and examine how the people in space work and move. As the international audience grows, and new genres come into view, the 2A City – Architecture Movie Awards take account of more than just the film’s viewing. A lot of influential programs, lectures, as well as discussions, are to be organized that may add to the rational impact of the cinema and architecture. The Jury At 2ACAMA, the board of judges comprises of the independent panel of adjudicators who are “renowned professionals” in the fields of architecture, business, film production, education, publishing, as well as culture. Eva Sangiorgi Constanze Ruhm Golmar Kempinger-Khatibi Elise Feiersinger Karl-Heinz Klopf Sum and Substance At 2ACAMA, we believe that film controls space just as architecture persuades film. So, 2ACAMA has been designed to identify movies that make dependable and significant contributions to humankind and the built environment utilizing the art of cinema. A stunning gamut of architecture and cinema lovers from all over the world would witness the event. The venue for 2ACAMA is Belvedere 21 in Vienna, Austria, on 5 June 2020. The film registration for the 2A City – Architecture Movie Awards 2020 begins on Feb 15th, 2020. The registration deadline for the 2ACAMA 2020 is April 1st, 2020.
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New York's art house cinema IFC Center expanding with help from Kliment-Halsband Architects

Good news for film fans. New York City's IFC Art House cinema on Sixth Avenue is set to expand, increasing the number of screens from 5 all the way up to 11. The expansion by Kliment-Halsband Architects is a refreshing change in the cinema world which has seen numerous theaters close down this year. By using a vacant plot adjacent to the IFC site, the cinema will be able to increase its footprint from 10,300 square feet to 20,000 square feet. This enables it to almost double its capacity from 480 people to 940 which will no doubt generate further revenue—something crucial for independent cinemas in New York. Architects are moving one original screen to the basement to create a larger lobby to deal with the anticipated volume of people. The area will double as space for parties and receptions. The new extension borders Cornelia Street in New York's West Village, but it will not change the existing center's main entrance on 6th Avenue. Speaking to IndieWire, John Vanco, senior vice president and general manager of the IFC Center, said, "After years of being the top-grossing venue in the country for many terrific specialized films like Boyhood, Citizenfour, Blue Is the Warmest Color and each annual edition of the 'Oscar-Nominated Short Films,' as well as hosting the nation’s largest documentary film festival, DOC NYC, it’s become clear that the audience for IFC Center's programming keeps growing, so to accommodate them, IFC Center needs to grow, too.” Just six years ago the cinema only had three screens. The architects declined to comment further on the design.
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Rahm Emanuel looks to lure George Lucas museum to Chicago

A short time from now in a neighborhood not far, far away… filmmaker extraordinaire George Lucas may land his art and film museum in Chicago. The move comes after the filmmaker's bid to build the museum in San Francisco fell through last year. Mayor Rahm Emanuel formed a task force last week, directing a dozen civic leaders to scout out, as the Sun-Times summarized, “a site ‘accessible’ to all Chicago neighborhoods that’s large enough to host a museum ‘comparable to other major cultural institutions,’ but does not ‘require taxpayer dollars.’” The task force is co-chaired by businessmen Gillian Darlow and Kurt Summers. Emanuel gave the group until mid-May to find a homebase for the Star Wars creator, who last year married Mellody Hobson, president of the Chicago investment firm Ariel. Lucas now lives in Chicago part-time, but Lucasfilm Ltd. and special effects company Industrial Light & Magic are still based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Lucas had originally scoped out a spot in the Presidio, but was rejected by the Presidio trust—the nonprofit that oversees the federally owned land at the southern end of the Golden Gate Bridge. Lucas' was one of three proposals for The Presidio's 8-acre mid-Crissy Field site, all of which The Presidio Trust rejected earlier this year, saying in a statement "We simply do not believe any of the projects were right for this location." Spokesman David Perry has described the 95,000-square-foot museum as the “history of storytelling” and the “world’s foremost museum dedicated to the power of the visual image.” Chicago is home to many museums, both well-known like the Art Institute and the Field Museum, and a bit more odd—say, the International Museum of Surgical Science. But the Lucas museum, which will include film memorabilia as well as works of art from the likes of Norman Rockwell and Maxfield Parrish, would be a big get. San Francisco is still vying for the return of its film Jedi, but we’ll see in one month how Rahm’s empire might strike back.
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The Portage Lives! Church Will Not Acquire 92-year-old Chicago Theater

Supporters of the Portage Theater breathed a sigh of relief Thursday when it was announced a local church would withdraw their bid to acquire the 92-year-old cinema on Chicago’s northwest side. A hearing with the Zoning Board of Appeals had been scheduled for Friday, from which Chicago Tabernacle sought a special use permit to convert the theater into a house of worship. The Portage is known around Chicago for its Silent Film Festival and as the set for some scenes in Public Enemies, a 2009 film about bank-robber John Dillinger.  It had become somewhat of an anchor for economic development in the Six Corners business district of its Portage Park neighborhood, after a 2006 renovation pulled the aging theater out of hard times. “Save the Portage” became a rallying cry around town when the church announced their plans in March. Roger Ebert and 45th Ward Alderman John Arena were among the many who flocked to the theater’s side. Its management applied for landmark status with the city in April. Chicago Tabernacle is reportedly in “final negotiations” for another site, potentially a defunct movie hall at 3231 N. Cicero Ave.
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Highlight> Michael C. McMillen: Train of Thought

Michael C. McMillen: Train of Thought Oakland Museum of California 1000 Oak Street, Oakland Through August 16 The Oakland Museum of California’s new exhibit looks at four decades of work by Michael C. McMillen, a California-based mixed-media artist. Curated by Philip Linhares, who is also a long-time collaborator of McMillen’s, the retrospective includes sculptures, tableaus, paintings, drawings, films, and large-scale installations. Found objects have long played an important part in McMillen’s work since childhood, when he began crafting toys for himself out of old radios and other discarded items. The artist’s creations often call to mind the cinematic landscapes of a Hollywood picture, somewhat appropriate given that he once worked making miniatures, like the motel model above, and props for films, including such sci-fi classics as Blade Runner and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. McMillen often uses architectural references and clever visual cues to transport viewers into an altered reality. He wants viewers to “come away from the experience seeing the world in a slightly different way,” McMillen said in an artist’s statement.