Posts tagged with "Christian de Portzamparc":

Placeholder Alt Text

Frankenstorm Snaps Crane at Portzamparc’s One 57

Hurricane Sandy is bearing down on New York and New Jersey, and the current 55 to 60 mile an hour wind gusts tearing through Central Park have already taken their toll on Manhattan's starchitecture, partially collapsing the construction crane at Christian de Portzamparc's supertall One57 tower on West 57th Street. The storm snapped the boom of the crane at the summit of the 95-story, 1,004-foot-tall residential tower, which now dangles precariously over the streets of midtown Manhattan. The scene on the street is still developing, but NY1 reports that the crane could become off-balance causing a further collapse.  Surrounding streets have been closed and emergency crews are on the scene. [Via Observer & Curbed.] Elsewhere in New York, wind gusts are picking up. The storm surge along the East River has sent water rushing into low-lying areas of the East River Esplanade and FDR Drive. In Brooklyn, AN stopped by the Gowanus Canal (photo below) at approximately 1:30pm to find a higher-than-normal water level, but no significant flooding in the area. As Sandy moves closer to land, winds and rain are expected to increase and the storm surge to rise.
Placeholder Alt Text

De Portzamparc Tops Out in Manhattan

Curbed New York snapped some pictures of New York's tallest residential tower, One57, designed by Christian de Portzamparc, which topped out today. At 1004 feet,  One57 surpassed New York by Gehry, but it won't be alone at the top for long. There's a whole new crop of super tall residential towers planned around Manhattan.
Placeholder Alt Text

Council Approves Riverside Center

    Today Extell Development got the green light from City Council to build Riverside Center on one of the last major parcels of land at the edge of the Upper West Side. Among several concessions made to the community, the developer agreed to sink $17.5 million into Riverside Park, build a 100,000 square foot school, renovate a recreation center on West 59th Street and build 500 affordable housing units (though much of it offsite). The 3.1 million square foot project includes a series of towers designed by Christian de Portzamparc between 59th and 61st streets and will provide as much open space as Lincoln Center, the architect told AN last year. Portzamparc worked with landscape designer Signe Nielsen to break up an existing superblock and create a view corridor that extends toward the Riverside Park. Like most mixed-use projects, the developer said public amenities, such as grocery stores and the school, would fill the base of the towers.
Placeholder Alt Text

Who Trumps Trump?

The Times' dogged development reporter Charles Bagli had a big scoop yesterday on Christian de Portzamparc's new tower, Carnegie 57, and what it portends for a construction recovery. That said, we couldn't help but notice a minor error in the article's lede: "Gary Barnett, one of New York City’s most prolific developers, is about to start construction of a $1.3 billion skyscraper on 57th Street that will overtake Trump World Tower as the tallest residential building in the city." The only problem is, Trump World Tower was already surpassed by Frank Gehry's Beekman Tower, which topped out in November. That shimmering, Bernini-swaddled building rises to 867 feet, six feet higher than Costas Kondylis' Death-Star-on-Hudson. We wouldn't have mentioned this except that the errant factoid has been picked up all over the place. Granted, Bagli could have meant completed residential buildings, but it also leaves out the issue of other prospective projects like Hines' MoMA Tower by Jean Nouvel, which, even at its haircut height of 1,050 feet, is still taller than Barnett's 1,005-foot tower. Just saying. (Keep in mind that while we were busy writing this frivolous blog post, Bagli was off blowing the lid on another major story, this time that plans to move Madison Square Garden have been revived.)
Placeholder Alt Text

Broad Narrows His Sites on Downtown

According to both the New York Times and the LA Times, Eli Broad appears to have settled once and for all on a Downtown LA site for his new museum, and has gone so far as to hold a new competition for its architect. Further background has it that Thom Mayne, who had been favored to design Broad’s museum, is now out, and the new  finalists are Rem Koolhaas, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Herzog & De Meuron, Christian de Portzamparc, Foreign Office Architects, and recent Pritzker Prize winners SANAA. According to the New York Times, the jury appeared to favor Diller  Scofidio + Renfro and Koolhaas. A choice, according to their story, could be made within the week. If built, the museum would be located on Grand Avenue just east of Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall and across the street from the LA Museum of Contemporary Art where he has played key roles recently in both keeping the museum on keel with a $30 million gift and steering it towards new director, Jeffrey Deitch. AN reported back on March 16 that Broad was leaning toward downtown for his museum. The site is currently slated for retail development within phase two of the now-stalled 3.5 million-square-foot Grand Avenue Project.