Posts tagged with "Chicago Architecture Biennial":

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Performances rule the day at the Chicago Architecture Biennial

Performance has been the breakout surprise of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. While many of the works inside the Chicago Cultural Center grapple with issues of urbanism, politics, and the resonances of Modernism (especially Mies’ oversized presence in the city) in contemporary culture, the three performances included in the opening weekend program address and embody what is at stake. Views from Superpowers of Ten by Andrés Jaque and the Office for Political Innovation (andres_jaque, Instagram)Views from Superpowers of Ten by Andrés Jaque and the Office for Political Innovation (@andres_jaque, Instagram) Superpowers of Ten by Madrid/New York-based architect Andrés Jaque and his Office for Political Innovation, developed for and first performed at the Lisbon Architecture Triennial 2013, uses pop, oversized props and black-clad performers to restage of the Eames’ icon Powers of Ten. The original film was filmed on the banks of Lake Michigan, not far from the Chicago Athletic Club where it was performed. Jaque’s reworking expands the Eames narrative to our contemporary condition. The exponential zooming out from Earth and then back into the heart of the atom now includes critical questions of space junk, nuclear fallout, immigration, race, queerness, and transgender identity. In a gallery the unorthodox mix of para-architectural issues might seem ponderous, but told through pantomime, they resonate visually and emotionally. We Know How to Order, conceived by Bryony Roberts, and choreographed by Asher Waldron of the South Shore Drill Team powerfully superimposes the movement of African American bodies in space on top of the charged site of Federal Center by Mies van der Rohe. The South Shore Drill Team, hailing from one of the poorest neighborhoods in Chicago, trains young people to master the precise choreography. On the plaza, while the performers mimicked the lines of Mies’ architecture, which underscoring the conditions of universal space into the public realm, they also brought joy and dynamism to the windswept public space. Even stalwarts of the architecture community were moved to tap their feet and wipe their eyes. https://vimeo.com/141231941 Performed in Mies' super spare Carr Chapel on the IIT campus, Theatre by Mexican artist Santiago Borja brought a different kind of otherness to the Miesian space of worship. The performance was set with two specially-designed petate rugs, woven in Mexico, that represent esoteric geometries developed in Europe at the start of the modern movement. Made out of palm leaves, one rug sits on the floor and the other hangs above, demarking what is not so much a stage as an abstract spiritual space for Ingrid Everwijn, the lead teacher of the Eurythmeum CH in Dornach Switzerland. Dressed in pink and yellow dress, Everwijn performed eurythmy movements—a kind of “spiritual gymnastics” developed by Rudolf Steiner and Marie Sivers in early 20th Century. The result was mystical, irrational, and energetic, as well as an immersive experience that undermined the rigors of Miesian abstraction.
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House Housing: An untimely history of architecture and real estate in 23 episodes

After a marathon session of presentations of all architects/artists in the biennial Thursday afternoon was marked by a preview of the complex, yet succinct exhibit House Housing capturing the history of inequality of designed inhabitation. Staged as an open house in one of last remaining buildings of one of the first federally-funded housing complex in Chicago, the exhibition is a walk-through into the part of the future home of the National Public Housing Museum (NPHM). Standing in front of the open house the curators with NPHM directors and residents gave a glimpse of the process that led to this collaboration to the audience in front of the open house. Inside the entrance a dilapidated apartment served as the concrete prop for the exhibit introduced as "An untimely history of architecture and real state in twenty three episodes". Empty, low lit rooms with walls carrying scores of uncannily pealed paint become a home for the installation made of home looking furniture, shelves, desks and platforms. Using multiple mediums and told in 23 episodes throughout the open house, House Housing further uses domestic media such as the phonograph, answering machine, television and iPad to tell the story of inequality of housing that are lived everywhere today. As Martin writes in the pamphlet coming with the exhibit, the domestic media in the installation transforms the crumbling rooms of former apartments into "a whispering, humming history machine." Being inside the open house gives a special sense to the material presented as a culture that is not only economically constrained, but also lived as form of constraint. With this exhibit the NPHM inaugurates its future home and hopes to further initiate debates on economies for housing not shy of ideological investigations of the cause, crisis and removal of modern housing and its replacement with typologies of new urbanism. A couple of visitors could be heard commenting how the spaces of the open house feel like being in a socialist home, a comment not too far off if one unjustly equates poverty with a specific ideology. Ultimately House Housing points to the "art of inequality" carried via the twenty three episodes that are specific, yet global, that its design is still happening as we experience the open house visit. A bleak preview of the future to come that is also uncertain. The exhibition is installed by the Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture and assembled by a team of researchers at Columbia University directed by Reinhold Martin and curated together with Jacob Moore and Susanne Schindler. The group's website has more information about this long term project.
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At the Chicago Architecture Biennial, 99 architects answer, “What’s Urgent?”

The day started with a marathon session involving all participants in the Chicago Architecture Biennial. Hans-Ulrich Obrist, celebrated curator at the Serpentine gallery in London, together with Sarah Herda, director of the Graham Foundation, and architect Joseph Grima, both Chicago Biennial directors, asked 99 architects one simple question: What is urgent? Every participant had 15 seconds to speak, followed by impromptu questions by the curators. The responses were billed as "Telegrams to the World." As Obrist explained, this format turns a boring conference model into something of a non-conference. The ideas and information are not announced and then delivered. They simply happen informally and as the conversations goes. One of the first participants was architect Andrés Jacque with his call that architecture needs to be more political. Fake Industries Architectural Agonism replied with the message that there should be more open competitions for architects. There were other calls for urgencies, such as achieving gender equality in architecture and using uninhabited housing stock in Greece to house refugees instead of building camps, as well as calling for more order in architecture by Ben Aranda. Some who were not present in Chicago in person, or architects who were putting last touches on their installations in the Biennial's main exhibition space left notes that were read aloud. For example, a mischievous note by Italian architect Stefano Boeri was read in his absentia: "Nothing serious can be said about architecture in 15 seconds." There were some other notes of dissent to the topic of urgency such as "Nothing is urgent" and "Deadlines are urgent more than anything". In redux, those statements offered a cross-section of architects thinking practically about their daily practices and challenges. The event went for a while and was meant to be a place where one comes and goes as one wishes, somewhat similar to a radio program performed in situ.
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Rapid Response: Jeanne Gang reimagines the police station in Chicago

"We were outraged by what we saw—by the violence in everyday life," said Jeanne Gang when asked about the impetuous behind her firm's project Polis Project, a proposed reinvention of the typical police station on view at the Chicago Cultural Center as part of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. The work, like any number of projects in the exhibition, highlights the what curator Joseph Grima calls “architectural agency,” where firms take on projects not for a client, but out of a sense of urgency to architecturally address important issues. Sparked by incidents of police violence against African Americans across the United States and supported by the May 2015 Obama administration policy brief: the “Final Report of the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing,” Studio Gang’s research and design proposal flanks the two sides of the Center’s grand stair. One side displays a history of law enforcement architectures—from the neighborhood police box to today’s bunker-like stations—and the other a design proposal for Chicago’s 10th District Station in Lawndale. “We asked ourselves “What is a police station in the 21st Century?”” she noted, pointing out that while past incarnations were community-based as police officers moved out of the neighborhoods where they had a beat, the tensions between locals and officers increased. The architecture of reflected that conflict. “The police station doesn’t carry the same ideas of democracy as a court house,” she noted, but by imbuing these values into the station building, Studio Gang hopes to point a way forward to a new idea of architecture. "Everyone comes though the same front door," Gang said, and explained how the building is more like a community center than a jail. Little things, like free Wi-Fi, and big things, like mental health services, computer labs, park space and retrofitted housing for officers in the neighborhoods, are meant to break down the barriers between the police and residents. Work is already underway. A police-owned parking lot is being transformed into a new park and basketball courts that is meant to be a shared, non-confrontational space in the neighborhood. “This community will have a safe place to play.”
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Bold new visions for the future city take shape at the Chicago Architecture Biennial

The international architecture cognoscenti have descended on the Chicago Cultural Center with a motherlode of new content from Thailand to Ecuador, ranging from robotically-assembled structures to investigations into social and infrastructural inequality. The consequences of this assemblage will unfold over the next few months, but one room in the Cultural Center is particularly clear in its ambition and vision for the future. BOLD: Alternative Scenarios for Chicago explores some of the less iconic, more layered pieces of Chicago's urban fabric. Organizer Iker Gil of MAS Studio prompted 18 local designers to make proposals for urban projects around the city. "I wanted to look forward and imagine new possibilities, but remain still attached to reality," said Gil. "We wanted to use the rules but tweak them a little bit to keep them grounded. Emerging designers such asWEATHERSHinterlands Urbanism and Landscape and PORT Urbanism were included alongside established designers such as JAHN and Stanley Tigerman. SOM was paired with smaller firm CAMESgibson. The exhibition prompted designers to tackle key issues at stake in Chicago such as civic, ecological, and infrastructural problems, as well as typological problems like empty lots and high-rises. The projects in the show not only propose new ideas for addressing these issues, but also new ways of conceptualizing an aesthetic project, mostly around bright colors, strong figures, and narrative-based designs. Design with Company chose to reimagine the 1987 Library Competition with a series of 20 "late entries," many of which were based on comments from the public in response to the original competition. They made a stack of referential forms from Chicago and elsewhere, each making its own story, but also combining for one over-arching narrative. SOM and CAMESgibson reimagined the high-rise, using Gibson's visions for new ways of living, combined with SOM's high-rise know-how. The result is a prototype tower that would be deployed at L stops around the city, "upping the ante for transit-oriented development," according to Gibson. URBANLAB proposed to make part of Lake Michigan into a series of filtering civic green spaces that would clean the water, while PORT Urbanism took Lakeshore Drive and put it in the lake to provide a more developable area west of the highway, caving to a law that bans building east of Lakeshore Drive. The resulting space lets a series of towers spring up, which reframes Grant park in a completely new urban condition. David Brown collected nine vacant lots from Chicago's 15,000, assigning them to local designers who reimagined the rules of the empty lot, making a series of flat surfaces into a new collective public space. BOLD's local Chicago agenda stands in stark contrast to the international explosion in the other rooms of the main exhibition. The explorations here posit a palpable group of ideas about how to design cities, with the focus on Chicago. What can investigations in a lively urban place like Chicago teach the rest of the world? BOLD embodies much of the Chicago-specific things about the Biennial, with a strong sense of place and a clear mission that translates globally. The best part of it is that it makes manifest the nascent design scene that has been bubbling up in Chicago for the last seven years. Through strong support from institutions and universities there, this group of young designers has imagined new ways of engaging the city while also forming a cohesive aesthetic and engaging attitude toward architecture in general. So far, it is the locals that are stealing the show.  
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Winner of 2015 Curry Stone Design Prize Announced

Hong Kong–based nonprofit research and design firm Rural Urban Framework (RUF) won the Curry Stone Design Prize for its work rebuilding villages across China. Joshua Bolchover and John Lin, both professors at the University of Hong Kong, founded RUF in 2006. Their goal is to harness design to “stabilize, reinvigorate, and rebuild” China’s rural populations. Currently, China is experiencing a mass exodus of population from villages as people move to cities in search of better opportunities. In 1980, approximately 80 percent of all Chinese lived in villages. Today, more than half of the population lives in cities. According to research by Tianjin University, China loses approximately 300 villages every single day. Working closely with the locals, RUF has completed a variety of projects to meet each community’s specific needs, including bridges, schools, hospitals, houses, and even a garbage collection center. To date, RUF has worked in 18 villages to combat the effects urban sprawl and is designing and planning entire villages and prototype housing. “The work of RUF is addressing one of the most urgent current geopolitical issues, how to deal with the imbalances created by large mass migrations,” said Emiliano Gandolfi, the Prize Director. “Their work is exemplifying how architecture should establish a dialogue with the community and the environment in order to built structures that respond to their changing needs.” The Curry Stone Design Prize, founded in 2008 to celebrate socially-engaged designers and inspire others to use design, selects winners by consulting social impact experts and humanitarian advocates. RUF will receive a cash prize to aid its mission and projects in China. RUF will participate in a panel at the Chicago Architectural Biennial, led by Prize Director Emiliano Gandolfi on Friday October 2, from 2:30-4pm CST, taking place at the Claudia Cassidy Theater inside the Cultural Center. A short film produced by the Curry Stone Foundation about RUF’s work will also be shown during the panel.
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First Look> Inside the Chicago Architecture Biennial

AN got a firsthand look at some of the projects inside the Chicago Cultural Center, many of which are juxtaposed across media, scale, and intellectual territory. For example, simple wood models from South African studio Noero Architects' 180 Square Meters sat quietly next to a wild set of renderings by François Roche that showed digital narratives of buildings as characters in their surroundings. Nearby, an oddly-detailed full-scale mock-up of a light steel stud-framed room welcomed visitors to go inside. Here are some of our favorites from our first glimpse at the sprawling main exhibition in Chicago: "The End of Sitting" questions why we design so much of our environment for sitting, given recent research showing how unhealthy it is to sit all day. This is the first show by the radical architecture and media collective Environmental Communications. It includes a selection from 200,000 images found in a Venice, California, garage. The Rock Print load-bearing column was built using a robot that placed rocks bound by string into a mold, which was then removed to create this curious structure. Atelier Bow-Wow occupied the courtyard of the Cultural Center, which is an important place, but is often cut-off from the rest of the building. They animated the courtyard by exploring the idea of a prison as a place of potential. Amanda Williams's work on the south side of Chicago includes a set of abandoned houses painted with colors derived from pop culture in the surrounding neighborhoods. It is displayed in a hallway. MOS Architects built a house made of hallways to critique McMansions, which they see as all foyers and hallways. Its disciplinary deadpan was a great juxtaposition next to "Architecture is Everywhere" by Sou Fujimoto Architects, a series of small everyday objects, like staples and binder clips, arranged into architectural models complete with scale figures. Makeshift is an ad-hoc construction that responds to its specific site with an improvised structure for music performance. It is based on the music legacy of Chicago. The Biennial is bustling with people as well, as everyone from Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel to designers from around the world are in attendance. For ongoing Chicago Biennial coverage, check back with AN over the next few days and weeks.
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Chicago Architecture Biennial releases full list of public programs and events

Get out your calendars. As The Chicago Architecture Biennial draws near to its October 3 debut, the festival's organizers have released a list of events and public programs that should help fill out your social schedule into December. You can peruse the whole list of events on the biennial's website. Features include lectures by Pritzker Prize–winning architects (like Thom Mayne); tours of Frank Lloyd Wright's SC Johnson Campus (which just opened for tours for the first time since its construction in 1950); and a film series exploring "architecture through the lens of cinema." The full list of biennial participants was released last month.
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Eavesdrop> Holl-y Moly: Could there be a ballet about Steven Holl at the Chicago Architecture Biennial?

The Chicago Biennial will not be short on architectural morsels, but the most delicious one could well be “a ballet about Steven Holl,” which sources tell AN will be held in a local theater. What exactly a “ballet about Steven Holl” means we are unsure, but here’s hoping that it stars Robert de Niro (a Holl doppelgänger) in his biggest dance role since his infamous “Twinkle Toes Shakespeare” role in Stardust (2007).
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Iker Gil to curate speculative Chicago projects for city’s inaugural architecture biennial

As the Chicago Architecture Biennial's October opening approaches, its organizers are beginning to release details about its forthcoming exhibitions. The latest hint is an ad for BOLD, a show of “speculative proposals that re-imagine the design potential” of Chicago's waterways, roadways, vacant lots and public space. Subtitled Alternative Scenarios for Chicago, the show will be organized by architect Iker Gil of MAS Studio (Read AN's Q&A with Gil here.) Local graphic designers Plural are also overseeing the event. Per the press release, the following firms will participate in BOLD: CAMESgibson + SOM David Brown with 3D Design StudioCentral Standard Office of DesignAnia JaworskaKrueck+SextonLandon Bone BakerStanley TigermanMargaret McCurry,JGMA, and JAHN David Schalliol Design With Company Hinterlands Michael Pecirno PORT UrbanLab Weathers with AECOM Earlier this month the exhibition organizers announced the winners of its Lakefront Kiosk competition: Rhode Island–based Ultramoderne will build a sleek, low-slung pavilion dubbed Chicago Horizon. Its first show was announced last year: an exhibit of aerial photography by Iwan Baan. The inaugural biennial will host more than 100 architects and artists from more than 30 countries.
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Chicago Architecture Biennial adds 40 firms to inaugural festival’s roster

The Chicago Architecture Biennial released a full list of participating designers today, bringing the total to more than 100 architects and artists from more than 30 countries. Beginning October 3, the inaugural festival of architecture, art, and design is being billed as “the largest international survey of contemporary architecture in North America,” and if all goes well it is expected to become a regular occurrence.

In addition to big-name architects and artists like Bjarke Ingels, Iwan Baan, and Jeanne Gang, the biennial's participants include young, ascending firms from several continents.

Details about the festival, however, have been closely guarded by its organizers and Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who has framed the festival as a continuation of the legacy left by the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. Here's the full list of participants: Al Borde (Quito, Ecuador) all(zone) (Bangkok, Thailand) Andreas Angelidakis (Athens, Greece) Andrés Jaque / Office for Political Innovation (Madrid, Spain; New York, United States) Aranda\Lasch (Tucson and New York, United States) Architecten De Vylder Vinck Taillieu (Gent, Belgium) Assemble (London, United Kingdom) Atelier Bow-Wow (Tokyo, Japan) Iwan Baan (Amsterdam, Netherlands) Baukuh (Milan, Italy) Besler & Sons + ATLV (Los Angeles, United States) Tatiana Bilbao S.C. (Mexico City, Mexico) BIG - Bjarke Ingels Group (Copenhagen, Denmark; New York, United States) Santiago Borja (Mexico City, Mexico) David Brown with 3D Design Studio, Central Standard Office of Design, Ania Jaworska, Krueck+Sexton, Landon Bone Baker, Stanley Tigerman, Margaret McCurry, JGMA, JAHN (Chicago, United States) Carlos Bunga (Barcelona, Spain) Bureau Spectacular (Los Angeles, United States) SOM + CAMESgibson (Chicago, United States) Counterspace (Johannesburg, South Africa) Csutoras & Liando (Jakarta, Indonesia; London, United Kingdom) DAAR (Decolonizing Architecture Art Residency) (Beit Sahour, Palestinian Territories) Design With Company (Chicago, United States) Environmental Communications (Los Angeles, United States); Mark Wasiuta, Marcos Sanchez, Adam Bandler + GSAPP Exhibitions (New York, United States) El Equipo de Mazzanti + Nicolas París (Bogota, Colombia) Assaf Evron (Chicago, United States; Tel Aviv, Israel) Fake Industries Architectural Agonism + University of Technology, Sydney (New York, United States; Sydney, Australia) Fala Atelier (Porto, Portugal) Ramak Fazel (Los Angeles, United States) Frida Escobedo Taller de Arquitectura (Mexico City, Mexico) Didier Faustino (Paris, France) Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zürich (Zürich, Switzerland) + Self Assembly Lab, MIT (Cambridge, United States) Nikolaus Hirsch/Michel Müller (Frankfurt, Germany) with David Adjaye (London, United Kingdom), Markus Binder (Stuttgart, Germany), Bollinger + Grohmann Ingenieure (Frankfurt, Germany), Aroon Puritat & Chayanon Hansapinyo & Sumeth Klahan (Chiang Mai, Thailand), Tobias Rehberger (Frankfurt, Germany),Tomás Saraceno (Berlin, Germany), Superflex (Copenhagen, Denmark) Hinterlands Urbanism and Landscape (Chicago, United States) Moon Hoon (Seoul, Korea) Independent Architecture (Denver, United States)+ Paul Preissner Architects(Chicago, United States) John Ronan Architects (Chicago, United States) Johnston Marklee (Los Angeles, United States) junya.ishigami+associates (Tokyo, Japan) Barbara Kasten (Chicago, United States) Kéré Architecture (Berlin, Germany) Kuehn Malvezzi (Berlin, Germany)+ Armin Linke (Milan, Italy; Berlin, Germany) +Marko Lulić (Vienna, Austria) Anne Lacaton & Jean-Philippe Vassal + Frédéric Druot (Paris, France) Yasmeen Lari + Heritage Foundation Pakistan (Karachi, Pakistan) Lateral Office (Toronto, Canada) LCLA Office (Cambridge, United States; Medellín, Colombia) LIST (Paris, France) MAIO (Barcelona, Spain) Makeka Design Lab (Cape Town, South Africa) Mass Studies (Seoul, Korea) MOS Architects (New York, United States) New-Territories / M4 (Paris, France; Bangkok, Thailand) NLÉ (Lagos, Nigeria; Amsterdam, Netherlands) Noero Architects (Cape Town, South Africa) Norman Kelley (Chicago and New York, United States) OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen (Brussels, Belgium) + Bas Princen(Rotterdam, Netherlands) onishimaki + hyakudayuki architects (Tokyo, Japan) OPEN Architecture (Beijing, China) + Spirit of Space (Chicago, United States) otherothers (Sydney, Australia) P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S (Los Angeles, United States) Michael Pecirno (London, United Kingdom) Pedro&Juana (Mexico City, Mexico) Pezo von Ellrichshausen (Concepción, Chile) PIOVENEFABI (Milan, Italy) Plan:b Arquitectos (Medellín, Colombia) Point Supreme (Athens, Greece) PORT Urbanism (Chicago, United States) PRODUCTORA (Mexico City, Mexico) RAAAF [Rietveld Architecture-Art-Affordances] (Amsterdam, Netherlands) Pedro Reyes (Mexico City, Mexico) Bryony Roberts (Los Angeles, United States) + South Shore Drill Team (Chicago, United States) RUA Arquitetos (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) Rural Urban Framework (Hong Kong) Tomás Saraceno (Berlin, Germany) David Schalliol (Chicago, United States) selgascano + helloeverything (Madrid, Spain) Deane Simpson (Copenhagen, Denmark) Sio2arch (Chicago, United States; Barcelona, Spain) Smout Allen (London, United Kingdom) + Geoff Manaugh (New York, United States) SO-IL (New York, United States) Sou Fujimoto Architects (Tokyo, Japan) Stefano Boeri Architetti (Milan, Italy) Studio Albori (Milan, Italy) Studio [D] Tale (Harare, Zimbabwe; Cape Town, South Africa; London, United Kingdom) Studio Gang (Chicago, United States) TOMA (Santiago, Chile) UrbanLab (Chicago, United States) URBZ (Mumbai, India) Vo Trong Nghia Architects (Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam) WAI Architecture Think Tank (Beijing, China) WEATHERS with AECOM (Chicago, United States) Amanda Williams (Chicago, United States) Wolff Architects (Cape Town, South Africa) WORKac + Ant Farm (New York, United States) Liam Young (London, United Kingdom)
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An expanse of sustainable timber just clinched the Chicago Architecture Biennial’s Lakefront Kiosk Competition

Officials with the Chicago Architecture Biennial today announced the winners of the Lakefront Kiosk Competition, choosing a team whose stated goal was “to build the largest flat wood roof possible.” Dubbed Chicago Horizon, the design is by Rhode Island–based Ultramoderne, a collaboration between architects Yasmin Vobis and Aaron Forrest and structural engineer Brett Schneider. Their pavilion uses cross-laminated timber, a new lumber product that some structural engineers call carbon-negative for its ability to displace virgin steel and concrete while sequester the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide during its growth. Ultramoderne's long, flat roof “aims to provide an excess of public space for the Architecture Biennial and Chicago beach-goers,” according to the project description. Their design rose above 420 other entries from designers in more than 40 countries, and will receive a $10,000 honorarium, as well as a $75,000 production budget to realize the kiosk. BP is providing those funds as part of a $2.5 million grant to the inaugural biennial. Three teams—Lekker Architects, Tru Architekten, and Kelley, Palider, Paros—were finalists for the top honor. Fala Atelier, Kollectiv Atelier, and Guillame Mazars all received an honorable mention. The Biennial has posted a selection of submissions to the Lakefront Kiosk Competition on its Pinterest page.

After the biennial, Chicago Horizon "will find a permanent home in Spring 2016, operating as a food and beverage vendor, as well as a new public space along the lakefront.

During the Biennial three other kiosks will be installed along the lakefront. Details on those are due to be announced next week, but here are the preliminary project descriptions:
The Cent Pavilion, designed by Pezo von Ellrichshausen in collaboration with the Illinois Institute of Technology, is a forty-foot tower meant to convey silent and convoluted simplicity. Rock, the kiosk designed by Kunlé Adeyemi in collaboration with the School of the Art Institute of Chicago is a pop-up pavilion a public sculpture composed from the raw and historic limestone blocks that once protected the city’s shoreline. Summer Vault, designed by Paul Andersen of Independent Architecture and Paul Preissner of Paul Preissner Architects, in collaboration with the University of Illinois, Chicago, is a lakefront kiosk that consists of basic geometric shapes combined to create a freestanding hangout within the park.
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