Posts tagged with "Chairs":

Specsheet > Objects of Common Space: Residential Furniture

Residential furnishings that range from the mundane to the otherworldly—here is a selection of new furniture that physically and conceptually reinvigorates traditional and expected forms. Kreten Side Table Souda Industrial, organic, and sculptural, each of these side tables is completely unique. Original pieces designed by Isaac Friedman-Heiman are created in Souda's Brooklyn studio by casting concrete into a spandex mold. This unique material combination delivers forms with naturally occurring air bubbles and color variations. The side tables are suitable for indoor and outdoor use. Hi-Lo Shelving Moving Mountains
Equally sculptural and functional, this shelving unit is comprised of common plywood, fractured marble, and bright blue paint. The juxtaposition of high and low materials underline the stepped form, creating a graphic play between textures and color.
Chaise Klein Agency
Cleverly nicknamed "the long chair," the Chaise exposes the strength of two materials: steel and leather. The design is afforded by rolled sheet metal that sustains the weight of the resting area on top of the seemingly floating plane.
Sylva Daybed Coil + Drift
Wood grain and textured fabric come together in this six-legged daybed. The white-oak base is composed of a rounded-edge frame and distinctive hand-shaped legs, which taper on two sides. The sumptuous cushion is crafted with subtle tufting and meticulous seaming.
CAN 1 HAY
Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec designed CAN 1 to go beyond practicality and comfort to reinvigorate the entire idea of the sofa. Reinterpreted as something relaxed and accessible, it comes flat-packed and can be easily assembled at home from three basic elements: frame, cover, and cushions.
Slip Chair Erickson Aesthetics Made of matte Horween leather, wenge wood, and waved cord, this chair is elegantly assembled by inserting the wooden seat and legs into the seat back. The backside reveals the cord stitching that holds the tanned seatback taught.

A couple’s lifelong George Nakashima collection on auction at Freeman’s

Known as perhaps the most diverse collections of works by George Nakashima, the Roth Collection chronicles a relationship that one family forged over three decades with the artist. The George Nakashima Roth collection recalls the family's intimate visits with the artist to select furniture for their home—and now they are up for sale at the Freeman’s Design auction on October 8th. As the story goes, longtime couple Arnold "Archie" and Corinne "Cookie" Roth grew up primarily in New York in the 1920s and 1930s, met through mutual friends, married in 1950, and settled in Brooklyn. With humble beginnings, Corrine, the science teacher, taught in the New York public school system and Archie, an engineer, became the part-time owner of a small die cutting business. In 1966, they relocated to Livingston, New Jersey, where they remained through their lives. Fueled by a mutual devotion to modern design, the pair collected works that were indicative of their taste: wooden furniture that would be categorized by the auction houses as organic modernist. From the early turned-leg coffee table ordered in 1961 to the monolithic bench and cushion chairs from the Conoid series (dating to 1979 and 1980 respectively), Nakashima's work was handpicked by the Roths over the span of three decades. Each piece is a part of the story that unfolds, surveying Nakashima's evolving design sensibility and craftsmanship – the fusion and jutxaposition of two incongruous cultures, American vernacular and traditional Japanese craftsmanship.     His marriage of natural materials and hand craftsmanship illustrates his vision of the construction of a chair: function, beauty, and simplicity. When you look at Nakashima’s creations, you can see the the influence of American arts and crafts furniture, specifically the Windsor chair and the “captain's chair.” The Windsor influence is most apparent in the Straight Back chair, the Mira chair, the Four-Legged chair, the New chair, and to a lesser extent, the Conoid chair (the armchairs are a streamlined form of what is commonly referred to as the captain's chair). The New and Conoid chairs remain aesthetically tied to the Windsor, juxtaposed with a contemporary-looking Japanese yoke back and crest rail. In this poetic gesture, the Conoid chair became a modern design icon inspired by the 1924 and 1927 cantilevered chairs designed by Heinz and Bodo Rasch. Eventually, this unexpected and expressive combination of Eastern, Western, and modern influences came to shape each chair and evolve into the distinctly idiosyncratic design that would characterize the work of George Nakashima. You can view the complete catalogue online here. Freeman's: Design features works by George Nakashima, René Lalique, Eero Saarinen, Finn Juhl, and others. In advance of the auction, you can browse lots before live bidding begins on Sunday, October 8th at 12:00pm ET.

Luxy Chair Design Award

New product design contest on Desall.com: Luxy and Desall invite you to propose a new upholstered chair for indoor use, with a modern and refined design, conceived for both the contract and the residential sectors.

For more info: http://bit.ly/LuxyChairDesignAward

Contest timeline

Upload phase: 22nd September 2017 – 31st January 2018 (1.59 PM UTC)

Client Vote: from 31st January 2018

Winner announcement: approximately before the end of May 2018

Total awards

Royalties (with advance on royalties of €2000)

Participation is free of charge and open to all creative people (at least 18 years old).

Designing an office chair that doesn’t “murder architecture”

Architecture and design studio Barber & Osgerby recently spent over four years working with Vitra to design the Pacific Chair, an office chair “for the next generation,” or as Jay Osgerby put it, “a chair that won’t cause a panic attack.” It debuted at this year's Neocon to much fanfare. While it's yet to be confirmed, rumor has it that Foster + Partners already ordered the Pacific Chair for its San Francisco office. Osgerby discussed the involved process with managing editor Olivia Martin. The Architect’s Newspaper: Tell me a little bit about the design evolution for the Pacific Chair. Jay Osgerby: It started four years ago. The idea was to design a “checklist chair”—something that would check all the boxes big corporations require of a chair. We had never done a chair like that before and were incredibly naive. We said, “awesome, great, that shouldn’t be too complicated”… then we started and realized it was fantastically complicated. We quickly realized why all these office chairs look like machines, and in some cases like a dentist chair. We wanted to create something calm and appealing to architects; maybe something that you would want to have at home. We wanted something relaxing, something that wouldn’t give you a panic attack but would still perform. To find the answers to those requirements was really hard. One of the ways we started to approach the project was from a mechanical point of view. We placed the main mechanism and controls in the bottom of the seat. This mechanism responds to the user’s weight, so whether you are heavy or light, you’ll have the same experience sitting in the chair, which eliminates the need for a lot of levers. The other big breakthrough was to get rid of the arm structure so that it also emerges from the seat. Normally the arms come in from the side of you and this creates extra bulk. With each step and each iteration, we wanted to clean it up, to make it more discreet and more simple. So that’s how the design evolved really from briefing to being a reductive piece, something that’s essential. With open offices, it’s no longer about creating this territorial chair for one person, but a chair that can adapt to any user. The office space is constantly evolving. Now it’s all about open plan, sit-stand desks, alternative workspaces, etc. Did you think about these changes when designing the chair? The traditional office is going the way of the dining room. Coworking spaces are killing the office. It’s not bad, but I think there are issues with it. We’d seen these shifting workplace trends in our architecture practice: The freedom that technology has brought us creates a need to make furniture that works in all sorts of different environments. I spend a lot of time in the Ace Hotel in Shoreditch and the lobby is packed full with people working and spending a fortune on really expensive coffee in order to have colleagues for a day. The freelance economy is really what we were thinking of because the stereotypical office chair looks so alien in those environments. We wanted to create a chair that can sit in any of these places as well as Bank of America. What’s amazing about that is that the Pacific Chair has been so widely accepted—it’s in Norman Foster’s office in San Francisco, for example. How does your background in architecture inform making these types of products? Well, we are not qualified architects but we both studied architecture and that enabled us to appreciate how objects are in space. Specifically, an interior site gave us the context and the aesthetic judgment to make something calm. Architects all know how hard it is to spec something that doesn’t murder your project. You spend four to five years on a project, then you put in the office chairs and it creates chaos because the chairs are rarely seen in isolation, they are seen en masse, which destroys the architecture. Our architectural sensibility told us to create something that enhances the space.

Industrial designer recreates the Eames shell chair in wood

Tasked by Wisconsin furniture manufacturer Wooda with creating a chair, industrial designer Tucker Viemeister recreated Charles and Ray Eames 1950s Molded Fiberglass Side Chair in a log. This combination of a traditional raw material with new technology and CNC-machining challenges the notion that a design must be unique. “All designers feel challenged to create a great chair—but why? There are so many good ones already. What can the designer offer? What is new?” asked Viemeister in a statement. When Viemeister responded to Wooda's request for a new chair design with a photoshopped photo of a log with an Eames chair carved into it, founder Terry Sweeney was intrigued. He collected three eight-foot oak logs from a nearby forest and input the surface mesh metrics into a CNC-milling machine. The machines ground the end of the logs to a 21-inch-diameter, 17-inch-high seat using a process similar to a pencil sharpener. The rest of the log was left natural to further jar the eye as it tries to reconcile the iconic design in a wholly new medium. “The form is so engraved in our cultural memory that the slightest violation of line or curve stands out like fingernails on a chalkboard,” said Viemeister, whose clients include Corning glass, the National Zoo, Coca-Cola, Cuisinart, Apple, OXO, Toshiba, and many others. Wooda had initially reached out to the industrial designer because it wanted to connect its abundant access to raw materials, space, and technology with innovative ideas and fresh aesthetics. “Viemeister took me at my word when I said we seriously want to contribute to the heritage of great design,” Sweeney said in a statement. In addition to inviting acclaimed designers, Wooda has an open invitation on its site welcoming new, original ideas to be submitted for possible production.

Carlo Malerba translates iconic architecture to handmade chairs

A new series of chairs from Italian designer Carlo Malerba takes inspiration from the familiar buildings to let you create a “utopian village” in your own home. Among the seven designs in the series are a factory, a theater, and a condominium building. There are also interpretations of iconic buildings like the Basilica of Santa Maria Novella in Florence, the Chrysler Building in New York, and the Unité d’habitation in Marseille designed by Le Corbusier. These designs are available in three sizes, with the smallest standing at around two feet tall and the largest at around four and a half.

The Most Exciting Pieces from The AD Design Show

This year's Architectural Digest Design Show at Piers 92/94 was full of big-name brands with exciting tech innovations. However, a lot of the most exciting designs came from the AD Design Show's MADE section which featured juried galleries of more than 150 artists and designers from around the world.  León León's Acapulco chair isn't just stylish, it also happens to be made of Pineapple leather (yes, the fruit). The designers are the first brand in the world to utilize the fabric in a useable product. This hyperrealistic wallpaper from Flavor Paper comes in four mesmerizing color options. Each can make any office or home space feel balmy and tropical even in the dead of winter. Nobel Truong makes neon acrylic cacti sculptures and lamps that are wired with UV blacklight LEDs. They're perfect for those of us not gifted with a green thumb (even when it comes to succulents). Banner's Haven ergonomic chair is sculpted out of solid ash. They're available in black or white with leather or exotic calf hair upholstered seats. Sarkos wallpaper is entirely hand-painted and each panel is one-of-a-kind. The paint creates dazzling textures with shades that change depending on light. Everything at the Sony Life Space UX booth was exciting, from an incredibly high-definition Short throw projector to the portable version (seen above) that can be project on a wall, ceiling, or table. It can even fake a gorgeous view in a windowless room. There was also a stunning glass sound speaker that offers 360 degree non-directional clear sound. The most affordable product was a LED bulb speaker that can add music—and a warm glow—to any room. Miele's Generation 6000 dishwasher, in addition to being supremely quiet and efficient, can now be installed completely flush to the all—instead of a handle, just knock twice to open. Jennair offers fully integrated and wall-flush designs that come in a variety of options. One of their new features is an obsidian black interior that really makes food visually pop.

This Daniel Libeskind–designed chair might look sharp, but it’s actually very soft

The indefatigable Daniel Libeskind has designed a chair that might make some think that he's angling for a job to overhaul the USS Enterprise (or perhaps a $97 million earthbound residential replica of it). The faceted-yet-cushy Gemma was shown in prototype form by Moroso at Salone this year; the collection will include a full line of seating options. The piece is upholstered in a fabric whose pattern arguably resembles a far, far away galaxy: Blur, which was designed by Marc Thorpe for Moroso.

Lucky Seven: See how seven famous architects rethought Arne Jacobsen’s Series 7 Chair

In observance of the 60th anniversary of the Series 7 chair, furniture manufacturer Fritz Hansen enlisted seven architects to re-envision the classic Arne Jacobsen design. Explaining the impetus behind the program, Jacob Holm, CEO of Fritz Hansen, said, "If we fall asleep on top of our heritage, design becomes museum items. And if that happens, it (design) no longer adds new value to the present time." The participating firms—BIG, Snøhetta, Zaha Hadid, Jean Nouvel, Neri & Hu, Jun Igarashi, and Carlos Ott in association with Carlos Ponce de Léon—certainly created some eye-opening interpretations of the chair. The architects' comments on their designs reveal their inspirations and intentions. Bjarke Ingels Group "The inspiration for the design is the materiality of the chair, the essence of the layered veneer and the functionality of the stacking. The final result is a subtle repetition of the iconic form language." Neri & Hu Design & Research Office "The idea of a replica, a re-edition, hinges on the duality between the original and the re-design. Our take on this project is to embrace this exact idea of duality and create an actual 'double'. The doubling of two original seats facing each other becomes the new version: The singular chair multiplied as the individual becomes a community. Reminding us that we are never alone, but always together." Jean Nouvel Design "Our chair is an example of Jean Nouvel's design signatures: contrasting colors and juxtapositions. Black and white mark each chair—although they still play together in a feminine and masculine flow. Creating a reinforcement of the curves of the front and of the back of the shell." Zaha Hadid "The provision for this chair was to create a harmonic transition from the existing shell and how it can effortlessly touch down on the ground. This special edition formalizes the Series 7 chair as a dynamic and seamless expression of structure and support. Formed from two continuous steel rods, the sculptural base sweeps down to the ground and reaches up to embrace the undulating shape of the iconic plywood seat." Jun Igarashi Architects "When buildings collapse during earthquakes, the building materials are wasted. Our idea is to collect the waste wood, introduce a color and process it into boards that can be used for furniture." Carlos Ott Architects in association with Carlos Ponce de Léon Architects "The chairs have been intervened the same way a vertical garden grows organically up a wall. The upholstery climbs and settles peacefully on the shell of the chair. The curved lines which compose the foundation of the different areas in the garden are mimicked and adapted to the anatomy of the chair". Snøhetta "We nurture differences. When opposites meets, they conjure an interesting dialogue. When nature meets the cultivated, when humans interact with architecture, when soft and hard co-exist—interesting things happen. "Maybe the Series 7 chair with its metal legs and wooden seat acknowledges this juxtaposition. We wanted to explore the soft side of the chair. "The wood is a representation of softness in contrast to metal. A legless construction is free and indeterminate. It is versatile and simple. And maybe it can be a symbol for social interaction and playfulness. If we add even more softness to it we might be able to create a new user experience, additional functionality. We want it to be a multifunctional social tool in both singular and plural contexts. You can sit in any formation dictated by any social scene you are in. It can be a singular, free, soft chair or a plural one in a fixed social situation." The chairs will travel to design festivals in London, Copenhagen, and Gent, Belgium before being auctioned to benefit UNICEF.

Product> Choice Seats: Creative Chair Designs

Ready to revitalize a living room in a summer home, these freewheeling, fashionable chair designs offer comfort as well as outstanding styling. CH445 Chair, Stripes by Paul Smith Carl Hansen Collection, Coalesse Upholstered in a vibrant Maharam fabric designed by Paul Smith, this classic wing chair gets a new look. Chair designed by Hans J. Wegner. Steeve Arper This versatile chair is available with or without armrests, and with right, or left armrest. The frame can be entirely upholstered with a single material in just one color, with a single material in different colors, or with wood on the external side and with fabric, leather, or faux leather on the inside. The seat and backrest cushions have the same upholstery as the frame internal side. Designed by Jean-Marie Massaud. Hi-Turn Bensen This high-back swivel lounge chair features an internal steel frame. Injection-molded cold foam with a soft down seat make for an inviting and comfortable seat, and a tidy tailored appearance. Lilt Bernhardt Design Coolly modern, this lounge chair not only looks good, but is Greenguard certified, as well. The branch-like base of the chair is founded on the designer's childhood memories of climbing trees. Designed by Brandon Kim. Bart Swivel Moooi The roundness of the armchair's design is completed by its circular swiveling motion, which also adds another dimension to its coziness. The wooden frame is covered in foam and dacron; the seat cushion is foam. Diatom Moroso This stackable chair features a seat and back pressed from a single sheet of aluminum. Extremely lightweight, it is suitable for both indoor and outdoor use. Designed by Ross Lovegrove.

Catch this show of Lina Bo Bardi’s furniture and Roberto Burle Marx’s tapestries before it closes!

Tribeca's R & Company gallery at 82 Franklin Street is highlighting two Brazilian greats: Lina Bo Bardi (1914–1992) and Roberto Burle Marx (1909–1994). But act fast! Furniture by Bo Bardi and tapestries by Burle Marx are on display through the end of this week—the exhibit closes April 30. Lina Bo Bardi is best known for her monumental architecture, such as the sturdy São Paulo Museum of Art or the rugged SESC Pompéia in São Paulo. But her work in this exhibit, Lina Bo Bardi + Roberto Burle Marx, represents a much smaller scale. Furniture designed from the 1950s through the 1980s and executed in wood, metal, and leather show how her Brazilian modern thinking translated to the size of a chair. Designs dually showcase strong geometry and classic Brazilian curves that are a hallmark of her larger built work. In fact, a dining set on view in the exhibit was designed with Marcelo Ferraz and Marcelo Suzuki for the SESC Pompéia. Complementing Bo Bardi's furniture are textiles and totems by Roberto Burle Marx, generally regarded as the father of Brazilian landscape architecture. Playful patterns and geometric shapes are present in a variety of Burle Marx's larger projects such as the iconic Copacabana boardwalk, a modern interpretation of historic Portuguese paving designs; collaborations with Oscar Niemeyer in Brasilia; and private estates throughout the country. Zoom out on these landscape designs and you can see a clear connection between the large-format works and his smaller textiles and tapestries. In addition to landscape architecture, Burle Marx was a trained artist and sculptor with a keen interest in Brazilian folk art, themes that appear in his colorful wooden totems on display in this exhibit. Check out these works for yourself at R & Company in Tribeca through April 30.