Posts tagged with "Canopies":

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Swiss Firm Offers Bubbly Shelter to Bus Travelers

As of late bus stops are proving to be unexpectedly fertile grounds for architectural innovation. Swiss architects Vehovar & Jauslin are the latest to try their hand at the task in the form of a seemingly floating structure that provides shelter for a bus hub in Aarau, Switzerland. The canopy was realized with the help of engineering firm formTL who appear well-versed in undertakings of a similar ilk. The covering's cool tone derives from a blue-tinged upper membrane that filters through a clear underbelly. This ETFE-foil skin is printed with a bubble-pattern and filled with air to create a curved surface. A steel ring hugs the canopy's perimeter and helps to protect its fragile inflated contents. The entire amoeba-like form sits atop metallic columns that double as light sources once night falls. Sheltering a ground area of 10,764 square feet, the structure is pierced by a central three-pronged opening that welcomes natural light into the station. The project was first begun some nine years ago before its eventual completion late last year.
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How Nave Can He Be? Parsing Goldman Alley

Financial giant Goldman Sachs has received lots of attention recently for its headquarters at 200 West St. New York Times architecture critic Michael Kimmelman waxed poetic about the building’s glass canopy by Preston Scott Cohen. The canopy, said Kimmelman, “elevates what is really just a gap between two buildings into something almost as inspired as the nave of a great Gothic cathedral. That’s the power of architecture.” Or, in this case, the architecture of power. The latest, and more critical, take on Goldmans’ HQ by Times writer N. R. Kleinfield outlines the firm’s impact on the surrounding area which at the time of the buildings completion in 2009, was short on shops and restaurants. So using its $1.65 billion in Liberty Bonds plus $115 million in tax breaks, Goldman just created a neighborhood in its own image.
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Brooks + Scarpa’s Contemporary Art Museum Canopy in Raleigh

A folded canopy reinvents a former loading dock in the city’s historic Depot District

Raleigh’s Contemporary Art Museum chose its new home in the city’s Depot District carefully. Located in a former produce warehouse, the project calls attention to the city’s history of railroad transportation and red brick architecture while emphasizing its commitment to sustainability and adaptive reuse. Led by Brooks + Scarpa Architects, the project included renovation of the existing 21,000-square-foot structure and the addition of a 900-square-foot entry pavilion. The glass-enclosed lobby reinterprets the location of the original building’s loading dock with an expanded and folded canopy that announces the building’s new purpose and balances the effect of daylight on its interiors.
  • Fabricators Accurate Perforating, Alumiworks
  • Architects Brooks + Scarpa Architects
  • Location Raleigh, North Carolina
  • Status Complete
  • Materials Steel, aluminum, polycarbonate
  • Process Custom perforation design and fabrication
The architects saw an opportunity to treat the new museum entrance as a modern loading dock, a front porch that would deliver visitors into the galleries within. They began to experiment with the form of the rectilinear metal roof that originally sheltered the truck bay, expanding it and imposing a series of three folds to bend the shape skyward. The team developed a perforation pattern that shades the museum’s outdoor sculpture garden and the floor-to-ceiling glass lobby enclosure, then grows more dense to hide ductwork and sprinkler pipes indoors. Derived from the shape of flower petals, the pattern consists of three half-oval shapes with radii of 2, 4, and 6 inches. Each petal was combined with one other shape with the same radii, creating a total of 18 ovals in the pattern. These were laid out to create areas of greater or lesser density depending on the desired shading effect. While the perforated petals have 35 percent transparency, gaps between the ovals create an overall effect of 50 percent transparency indoors and 65 percent outdoors. The design team delivered shop drawings and sketches based on screen shots of Rhino files to architectural metal fabricators at Chicago-based Accurate Perforating and North Carolina-based Alumiworks. (The canopy’s top surface is composed of Polygal polycarbonate panels fabricated by North Carolina-based Jacob’s Glass.) Because the canopy’s interior slope does not match the exterior slope, transferring the complex geometry of the canopy into both top steel elevations at the intersections and into the bottom of the hollow structural section (HSS) steel substructure supporting the petal panels proved challenging. The canopy is built with steel wide flange beams, some of which are tapered and supported by the unreinforced masonry building and by three structural columns. Outdoors, perforated panels are attached to the underside of the frame and protected by polycarbonate panels installed overhead. Indoors, the perforated panels are installed beneath metal decking, insulation, and PVC roofing material. An HSS substructure suspended from the steel beams supports each assembly. While the canopy has become a symbol of the historic district’s renewal, not all visitors are welcome to its modern-day front porch. One-quarter-inch mesh between each petal shape keeps birds from roosting on flanges and steel beam supports. While the mesh allows pleasant North Carolina sunlight to filter into the museum’s courtyard, the glimpses of blue sky are also a nod to another bit of Southern porch culture—natives traditionally paint porch ceilings blue to mimic the sky, deterring mud dauber wasps from settling in.
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Clothing Becomes A Canopy at SCI-Arc

For the last several years, SCI-Arc's Studio 1A has given new students the chance to literally make their mark by producing projects that become permanent fixtures at the school. On Friday, this year's class revealed a project that started as a piece of clothing, then became a wire model, then became a mockup, and finally ended as a new undulating and faceted canopy and wall. Made of a recycled carbon fiber called Nyloboard, the project's more than 2,000 pieces were all hand cut and, somehow, none are exactly alike. They're attached with Gorilla Glue, nails, and screws. "It's something that exists at the scale of the world, which can take years for an architect," said Nathan Bishop, who along with Jackilin Hah Bloom and Jenny Wu led the studio.
(courtesy Jenny Wu)
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Mesmerizing SCI-Arc Graduation Pavilion

SCI-Arc held its graduation ceremony on Sunday in the parking lot in front of its building in LA's Arts District. And they did it in style: in front of a billowing 60 x 110 foot canopy designed by LA firm Oyler Wu Collaborative, whose principles Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu are both SCI-Arc professors.  SCI-Arc director Eric Owen Moss traditionally asks one of the school's faculty to design the  pavilion. For the last four years architect Alexis Rochas has done the honors (check out his design from 2009), but this year he gave the job to Oyler and Wu, who have made a name designing ambitious installations around LA and elsewhere. The team, with the help of both SCI-Arc students and their staff, built a billowing canopy consisting of a steel truss armature wrapped in a a changing grid of knitted rope, interwoven with a slightly translucent nylon mesh material. The structure was built to shelter 900 people. The firm began planning the structure in their graduate seminar this spring and started building it in June, welding, knitting and fastening virtually every day since they started. The rope's gridded pattern was made possible through an old-fashioned knitting technique, in which the team developed giant pegs to recreate what old ladies have been doing for centuries. The ropes' loose loops allowed them to contort the web's shape so it stretches along its edges and takes on varying profiles throughout.The combination of steel rope and fabric somewhat resembles billowing sails on a ship. And the fabric, which creates intriguing shadows as well as providing shade, was angled just right to provide solar protection specifically at graduation time: 5 p.m. Other Oyler Wu installations include Density Fields at Materials & Applications in Silver Lake, Live Wire and Pendulum Plane at WUHO Hollywood, and reALIze at LA Live. But the firm wanted to try something new, working with new materials like rope, mesh and even steel (they had worked primarily in aluminum). Their next goal is to erect an actual building, and it looks like that will happen with a new 16 story residential tower in Taipei. Construction shots of the graduation pavilion below:
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Aggregated Porosity Canopy: Digital Architecture Laboratory

Students and architects create a curving plywood canopy during this summer's Digital Architecture Laboratory workshop

This summer, Hunan University’s School of Architecture sponsored the Digital Architecture Laboratory (DAL), a workshop created to bring architects and students together to explore digital fabrication techniques. Hosted in Changsha, China, the workshop was led by Biao Hu, a professor with the university, and Yu Du, an architect with Zaha Hadid Architects. Suryansh Chandra, also with Zaha Hadid Architects, and Shuojiong Zhang, of UNstudio, were invited to participate as tutors for the workshop, which with a theme of “aggregated porosity” would explore variations in material density and the juxtaposition of solid forms with skeletal ones. Additionally, the project had to be a structure that provided shade and fit within an approximately 10-by-10-by-20-foot area.
  • Fabricator Digital Architecture Laboratory
  • Designer Digital Architecture Laboratory
  • Location Changsha, China
  • Status Complete
  • Materials Plywood, steel, tensile cable mesh, fasteners
  • Process Laser cutting, hand assembly
Using the concept of a waiting area outside an existing building, the team began the design process with a right-angled shell that resembled a typical bus shelter. The orthogonal grid was then stretched into an S shape, so that the lower curve formed a bench and the upper curve created a canopy. The form was rationalized into a grid of hexagonal components, each with a unique shape. By constraining three sides of each hexagon and allowing the other three sides to be changeable in length, the team was able to create a fluid, organic form, with curves and perforations, using a single shape. The canopy is supported by six L-shaped steel sections anchored to a wall. To these are attached set of six curving, laser-cut plywood ribs, which are cross-braced by additional ribs running parallel to the ground. Tensile steel mesh is fastened to this underlying grid, providing netting to which the hexagonal plywood panels could be attached. Made with off-the-shelf hardware pieces assembled into a customized circular joint, the fasteners allow each hexagon to be tuned by hand, ensuring panels are precisely positioned on the x, y, and, z axes.