Posts tagged with "CallisonRTKL":

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Facades+ Dallas will dive into the trends reshaping Texas's largest metro area

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Texas is adding more people per year than any other state in the country, and with nearly 8 million residents, the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area is the largest urban area in the state. On March 1, The Architect's Newspaper is bringing together architecture and development firms located within the metropolitan area for Facades+ Dallas, a fast-paced dialogue focusing on the region's tremendous growth and the projects reshaping it. Participants include 5G Studio Collaborative, CallisonRTKL, Harwood International, Merriman Anderson Architects, the CDC, L.A. Fuess Partners, Ibanez Shaw, Omniplan, DSGN Associates, Buchanan Architecture, Shipley Architects, Urban Edge Developers. Lauren Cadieux, associate at 5G Studio Collaborative, and Michael Friebele, associate at CallisonRTKL, are co-chairing the conference. In the lead up to Facades+ Dallas, AN sat down with Friebele to discuss trends within Dallas and CallisonRTKL's ongoing projects in the area and across the world. The Architect's Newspaper: To begin with, what facade-led projects are CallisonRTKL up to in Dallas and Texas as a whole? Michael Friebele: We are an interesting office in that we have a long-standing local reach here in Dallas-Fort Worth but also a broad depth of work around the globe. We often find it most interesting for us to take the international experience and find ways to apply those lessons throughout our work back home and likewise in the other direction. The collaboration between offices across CallisonRTKL really makes this possible.

From a conceptual standpoint, our work on a vertical campus in Downtown Dallas took cues from many lessons we have learned abroad, from site response to contextual integration, and paired these attributes with an evolving corporate business model. Ultimately, the concept was shaped around an affordable housing project just to the east of the site, maintaining a view corridor through the gesture of a loop that ultimately became a symbol for the company’s programmatic model. It is one in a line of projects coming up in Texas that we are excited about.

From a facade standpoint, our hospitality group is working on a Grand Hyatt Hotel in Kuwait that is currently under construction. The facade concept of self-shading finds a balance between the harsh climate of the region and the demand for expansive views. The pitch results in the natural placement of photovoltaics with the underside of the bay providing a highly transparent opening with minimal direct solar heat gain. The same team recently completed the core and shell of the Maike Business Center and Grand Hyatt in Xi’an. Here, two towers were linked by a belt truss to limit lateral loads while serving as a critical program link between the hotel and office towers. The facade was a simple extruded, serrated form linked in the middle by a vertical screen that emphasizes the composition.

I am working currently on the design of two China-based projects with quite a range of scale between them. OCT Chengdu is on the larger side with a dominant facade facing a key convergence of traffic in the city. The facade plays into that movement with a series of fins that peel upward to reveal the activity of the mall behind, thus activating what is traditionally a hard face. We have been working further to optimize this system. This project is currently under construction and should be complete in a few years. On the other side of scale, we recently began work on an Audubon Center in Zhengzhou. The concept is about tying program and landscape together underneath an observation ring. We have been working with Thornton Tomasetti on realizing the ring as a completely unsupported element over the waterfront with full height curved glazing that reveals the public behind, as if the visitor were a part of the facade experience. The Zhengzhou project will start in construction in a few months and be complete by the middle of next year.

AN: What unique opportunities and challenges are present for architects and designers in Dallas?

MF: Mark Lamster summed it up well in a Dallas Morning News article from April of 2016, "Dallas Architecture is a joke (but it doesn't have to be)."

In my opinion, the potential in Dallas is to be proactive rather than reactive toward challenging and evolving typologies but with that comes a certain degree of investment and risk. We can take lessons from two organizations that I believe have had the most impact upon the city in BC Workshop and Better Block. Both groups have been recognized for their innovative approaches to typologies and community engagement. The Cottages at Hickory Crossing is a noted example on the city’s south side.

An engagement of our value as architects and designers to all parties involved in a project, from developer to community, is key, but change will also depend upon us stepping out and trying something without permission. As Dallas further evolves, there is no better place to test and experiment, but we have yet to really commit to that, beyond few examples. In all, it is really getting back to our fundamentals of why we practice this profession and to search for its meaning once again.

AN: Which ongoing Dallas developments do you perceive to be the most exciting in terms of facade innovation and overall impact on the city?

MF: There have been some noted transformations in Downtown Dallas, from work by Architexas on the Joule Hotel, to Merriman Anderson’s work on the Statler Hilton, all the way to more recent conversions of 400 Record by Gensler. Each of these, among others, have defined in many respects the process of historical rehabilitation in Texas, but also have transformed the program in all cases. Almost overnight, there is a developed rhythm toward respecting the past and redefining the urban realm. The Statler and 1401 Elm represent the largest and most challenging cases of preservation in the city. Statler was many years in the making. Historical innovations during the 1950s proved quite challenging in the rehab of the building. The results of maintaining such a celebrated form and period in the rehab are nothing short of a feat. 1401 Elm is currently undergoing its makeover, with the marble currently off-site for rehab. It has stalled a few times during recent years but hopefully, it will become a major contributor once again.

Both projects are a glimpse into a city that is continually working to value its history more and more by the day. With our first panel, we hope to shed further light on this discussion.

Further information regarding Facades+ Dallas may be found here.
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Work stops on one of L.A.’s biggest construction projects

Construction on one of the largest projects under construction in Downtown Los Angeles, Oceanwide Plaza, has ground to a halt, according to The Los Angeles Times. The unexpected stoppage comes as the three-tower, CallisonRTKL-designed hotel, shopping, and residential complex was heading toward a mid-2019 completion date. According to The Times, the developer, a publicly-traded Chinese conglomerate known as Oceanwide Holdings, has indicated that financing troubles are behind the construction delay. According to a statement, Oceanwide is currently working to shore up the project’s finances and expects to start construction again in one month. More ominously, however, it’s believed that the project is somehow entangled in an ongoing political corruption probe that has scandalized the Los Angeles political establishment. According to The Times, federal investigators have inquired about the Oceanwide project in relation to possible crimes including bribery, extortion, money laundering, and kickbacks that could potentially involve City of Los Angeles officials and other development executives. No one has been formally arrested or charged in the investigation, however, and several other developments are also facing inquiries from federal authorities. The FBI raided the home and offices of Los Angeles city councilmember Jose Huizar in December as news of the probe surfaced. In the weeks since, the investigation has grown as another sitting city councilmember and several officials tied to Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti’s administration have come under scrutiny. Huizar, who oversees much of Downtown Los Angeles and was a voting member on the city’s powerful Planning and Land-Use Management (PLUM) committee, was stripped of key appointments in the fallout from the investigation. While he sat on the PLUM committee, Huizar made several controversial decisions that included a critical vote against granting Historic-Cultural Monument status to the William L. Pereira–designed portions of the Times Mirror Square complex, the historic home of The Los Angeles Times. At the time, Curbed reported, Huizar referred to the Late Modern structure as “an ordinary example” of Pereira’s work that did not merit recognition. Huizar is also behind Pershing Square Renew, an effort that would scrape away Pershing Square park in Downtown Los Angeles designed byRicardo Legoretta, Laurie Olin, and Barbara McCarren. With exterior work on Oceanwide Plaza nearly complete and interior work started on the project, it’s unclear that a short-term work stoppage will have much of an impact on the project’s final completion. A statement from the developer indicates that if construction resumes in February the project should wrap up sometime during 2020.
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Facades+ San Francisco will dive into the Bay Area's exciting technological trends

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The San Francisco Bay Area is nourishing one of the country's most active architecture scenes. Fueled by a booming technology sector, rapid population and commercial growth are delivering exciting new projects to the region. On February 7, The Architect's Newspaper is gathering leading local and California-based design practices for Facades+ San Francisco, a conference on innovative enclosure projects across the city, state, and country. Participants include EHDD, BuroHappold Engineering, CallisonRTKL, CO Architects, Heintges Consulting Architects & Engineers, and David Baker Architects. Joe Valerio, founding principal of Valerio Dewalt Train Associates (VDT), will co-chair the half-day symposium. AN interviewed Valerio about what VDT is working on and the firm's perspective on San Francisco's architectural trends. The Architect's Newspaper: San Francisco is arguably the nation's leading technological hub. How do you see this role impacting the architectural development of the city, and what do you perceive to be the most exciting facade trends in San Francisco today? Joe Valerio: Perhaps, the pressure that technology companies are creating on the building sector will finally lead to real innovation in how we build things. The San Francisco building sector does not have the capacity to move forward using conventional means. I believe that continual innovation will help the city catch up to its vast demand. It’s an exciting time for design in San Francisco. With technology evolving at such a rapid rate, it has been interesting to see how it is beginning to manifest itself in architecture, both physically and experientially. For instance, in the physical sense, buildings like the de Young Museum or the Transbay Terminal are utilizing parametric modeling to create interesting forms and textures with metal mesh. Faceted glass is also being implemented in interesting ways in high-rise projects, such as the LinkedIn headquarters or the Oceanwide Center. But on the experiential side, digital is becoming a new palette for architectural design. The Salesforce lobby, for example, uses digital projection mapping to draw people in from the street. Its translucent facade almost disappears from view, making the lobby feel like its extension. This is something that we have been experimenting with in our own work, in projects such as Art on theMart in Chicago or the YouTube lobby in San Bruno. What projects is VDT working on, and what innovative enclosure practices are being used? JV: We are developing a graduate student village for Vanderbilt University in Nashville, with our partners at Lend Lease Communities, and are looking at a wide range of modular and prefabricated construction techniques to meet the speed at which we need to deliver this project. New modular techniques that implement cross-laminated timber and steel into their modules are allowing us to go higher than the five stories limited by wood stick construction. We’re also implementing modular prefabricated cold-formed steel panel systems for quick assembly on site. Universities present tremendous opportunities in housing, and we find that embracing challenging parameters leads to very exciting outcomes. VDT is located in multiple cities across the country; what are the particular challenges and benefits of working in San Francisco? JV: One of the most exciting aspects of working in San Francisco is our client base. We work with companies that are constantly pushing the boundaries of technology, and for us, finding new ways to meet their needs with architecture is a thrilling prospect. Quite often, our work in the city deals with very interesting pre-existing buildings, such as in the case of Adobe Town Hall. Here we were challenged to both expand and reinvent the company’s dining experience all the while preserving a building that’s listed as a historic landmark. Its previous function as a tool factory became the driving force behind a new design, conceptually celebrating culinary tools developed by their new chef, and digital tools that Adobe continues to develop to this day. It’s opportunities like this that constantly pique our interest in San Francisco. But on the other side of the coin, having such a highly innovative and skilled architecture community has created a severe labor shortage in the city—a constant reminder of how thankful we are to have such a talented team. Is there a particular technique or materials that VDT is experimenting with? JV: There has always been a drive to bring new materials into our enclosures. Yet these systems are still dominated by old techniques and primitive materials such as glass. We have experimented with new materials such as ETFE, and we would forecast that assembling these old materials in innovative ways is the path forward. Remember the iPhone has a glass screen. Additionally, cross-laminated timber (CLT) continues to show a lot of promise. We have been working with a company on modular prefabricated CLT housing at a larger scale, and we’re excited to see how we can begin to leverage cost and design with new techniques. Further information regarding Facades+ San Francisco may be found here.
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New rendering released for L.A.'s third-tallest tower

To take a walk down Downtown Los Angeles's Figueroa Corridor these days is to behold a sea of construction cranes. The entire area is currently being transformed by rising crop of transit-accessible high-rise luxury towers. One of the biggest changes coming to the area will be the recently-proposed Figueroa Centre tower project by architects Callison RTKL. The designers recently revealed a second rendering for their new 66-story tower which, if completed according to plan, will become not only the third-tallest structure in Los Angeles, but also the tallest residential building in the region. The project is slated for 200 condominium units, 220 hotel rooms, and 94,000 square feet of retail spaces. The new tower—it will be located at 925 S. Figueroa Street and rise 975 feet—is part of the large-scale effort to make Los Angeles a better draw for large-scale trade and professional conventions by boosting the overall supply of rental housing and hotel rooms in the areas surrounding the Los Angeles Convention Center and L.A. Live complexes. The city is currently planning to add 8,000 new hotel rooms to those areas, a boom that over the next few years will add a new wing to Downtown Los Angeles’s fledgling skyline. For the most part, the new towers are being built above existing surface parking lots. Up until recently, the city’s downtown skyline was made up mostly of high-rise office towers built in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Over the next ten or so years, however, roughly 20 new towers are due to sprout along Figueroa Street alone, from the foot of L.A.’s newest, tallest tower—the 1,018-foot-tall, A.C. Martin-designed Wilshire Grand Hotel—to the southernmost flank of Interstate-10. Several of those projects are already well under construction, including the Callison RTKL-designed Oceanwide Plaza complex, a $1 billion project consisting of a trio of towers rising between 40- and 49-stories in height. The podium levels of that project are quickly rising out of the ground. Ultimately, the project will contain 150,000 square feet of shopping areas, 504 condominium units, and a 184-key hotel. The twin, 36-story tall Circa towers by Harley Ellis Devereaux are nearly topped-out, according to a time-lapse camera perched over the site. Crews at the Circa site have been snapping curtain wall elements into place over the last few weeks, while crews at the Metropolis project have finished one of that project’s four towers are and are making quick work of the remaining three. A timeline for the Figueroa Centre project has not been announced.
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66-story tower proposed for Downtown Los Angeles

Global architecture firm Callison RTKL and Newport Beach, California–based MJS Landscape Architecture have released a rendering of a new 66-story tall mixed-use residential tower proposed for the bustling entertainment district in Downtown Los Angeles. According to documents submitted to the Los Angeles Planning Department, the project would bring 200 condominium units and a 220-room hotel to 925 S. Figueroa, Urbanize.LA reports. The project would also include 94,000 square feet of retail spaces and parking for 617 automobiles. The project is one of a handful of towers Callison RTKL is currently working on in the Downtown L.A. area, including a 57-story tall,  Jenga-shaped tower proposed for a lot adjacent to Pershing Square. That tower features projecting, cantilevered swimming pools and a sky-lobby. Callison RTKL is also working on the three-towered Oceanwide Plaza, also on Figueroa Street. The new, rectangular tower is set to rise out of a large parking and retail podium. That podium will be topped with recreational uses for hotel guests and condominium residents. The rendering released for the project indicates that like many of the historic high-rise towers across downtown, the monolith will be capped by a flat-topped roof. The arrangement used to be inscribed in local fire code as a safety measure to be utilized in the event tall buildings had to be evacuated via helicopter, but the rule was recently overturned. The project at 925 S. Figueroa marks the 19th high-rise tower proposed or under construction along Figueroa Street in Downtown Los Angeles. Architects Gensler recently revealed plans for an eccentric, 52-story tall tower at the southern edge of this new district. Gensler is also responsible for the Metropolis, 1020 South Figueroa, and Fig+Pico projects along Figueroa. Meanwhile, SOM and P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S are behind the Olympia development, while Harley Ellis Devereaux and Hanson LA are deep into construction on the twin Circa towers. The developments—which track along the Blue and Expo light rail lines and surround the L.A. Live, Staples Center, and Los Angeles Convention Center complexes—are sure to continue to grow in their ranks as the city moves toward building 8,000 new hotel rooms near the Convention Center by 2020.
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Update: Developers for Oceanwide Plaza in Los Angeles release new renderings for $1 billion mega-project

Earlier this week, Oceanwide Real Estate Group revealed plans for the addition of a new Park Hyatt hotel branch to be located at the currently-under-construction Oceanwide Plaza development project in Downtown Los Angeles. Following up on these additional details, the developer has also released a slew of new, glossy renderings by visualization firm Visualhouse for the CallisonRTKL-designed, mixed-use mega-project. The $1-billion development will bring three new towers to the Los Angeles skyline, including a 677-foot hotel spire that will contain two separate pool decks, 184 hotel rooms, and some number of the total 504 condominiums to be located on the 4.6-acre site. The two neighboring, 40-story towers will contain the remaining condo units and will share a rooftop amenity terrace that will the complex’s 100-foot-tall podium of retail space. The podium, dubbed The Collection at Oceanwide Plaza, will be laid out as an indoor-outdoor, multi-level pedestrian mall and is to contain 150,000 square feet of commercial space. The entire complex's retail component will be wrapped by a 32,000-square foot LED ribbon wall. The Oceanwide Plaza project joins a collection of other Chinese developer-backed tower complexes coming to the area, with Greenland USA’s Metropolis and Shenzhen Hazens’s 1020 South Figueroa project, both of which feature retail, hotel, and residential components, taking root on either side of the newly-updated complex. For more information on Oceanwide Plaza, see the developer’s website.
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Park Hyatt luxury hotel added to Oceanwide Plaza development in Los Angeles

Luxury hotelier Park Hyatt announced this week that it has signed up to be a part of Oceanwide Plaza, $1 billion, 1,488,101-square foot, mixed-use development in Downtown Los Angeles. The development would mark the brand's first Los Angeles location. It is unclear whether the Park Hyatt addition will change the project’s fundamental details, but previously-filed plans for Oceanwide Plaza detail the inclusion of 504 condominium units, 153,000-square feet of retail space, and a hotel with 183 guest rooms. The project is being designed by CallisonRTKL and will be contained within a trio of high-rise towers positioned above a mid-rise retail podium outfitted as an indoor-outdoor “galleria”-style mall. A large tower, with a long exposure oriented toward the south, will contain the hotel component while two shorter, east-west oriented towers will contain the condominium units. The podium will be crisscrossed with interior paseos connecting opposing sides of the development site and is to be wrapped in a 32,000-square foot LED ribbon wall that will create a massive, splashy cornice line backing these proposed retail areas. The project will be located at the center of the ever-growing L.A. Live / Staples Center development area that includes the Los Angeles Convention Center, the partially-completed Metropolis complex, as well as many other in-process or upcoming condominium and apartment projects connected by access to Los Angeles’s Blue and Expo light rail transit lines. Located on a 4.6-acre site between 11th and 12th Streets on Figueroa, Oceanwide Plaza broke ground in late 2015 and its construction has necessitated one of the largest concrete mat pours in Los Angeles history, with crews for the construction firm Lendlease pouring an estimated 25,900 cubic yards of concrete and six million pounds of rebar for the complex’s massive foundations earlier this year. The project is expected to be completed by the end of 2018 and will be open to habitation in early 2019. News of the Park Hyatt hotel development was first reported by the Wall Street Journal. UPDATE: Developers for Oceanwide Plaza have released a slew of updated renderings for the project.
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Facades pro Brendan O'Grady on beating the heat in Dallas

CallisonRTKL Vice President Brendan O'Grady views Dallas' hot climate as an opportunity, rather than a challenge, when it comes to facade design. "With the intense summer heat there are numerous opportunities to integrate both passive and active facade design solutions that can reduce the overall environmental impact our buildings have," said O'Grady, who will co-chair October's Facades+ Dallas conference on high performance building design. The city's architects working abroad, moreover, are able to bring lessons learned in other high-heat areas to bear on the local AEC industry. "These firms have the opportunity to take this global perspective and intelligence and apply it to local problems related to facade design and fabrication," he said. Architects, engineers, fabricators, and builders working in the Dallas area excel in digital design and analysis, explained O'Grady. "I would say this is a direct result of the emphasis we are seeing on building performance over pure aesthetics in facade design," he said. On the flip side, "Hearing comments from a recent design awards jury, I would have to say that there is room for improvement in the way a building's program or specific use is reflected in the design of its facade," said O'Grady. "When you look at a building you should be able to tell if it is a hospital versus an office building or an apartment tower." Network with O'Grady and other movers and shakers in the facades world at Facades+ Dallas, October 13-14. Learn more about the first day symposium and the workshops offered on the second day at the conference website. Register today!