Posts tagged with "CallisonRTKL":

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New rendering released for L.A.’s third-tallest tower

To take a walk down Downtown Los Angeles's Figueroa Corridor these days is to behold a sea of construction cranes. The entire area is currently being transformed by rising crop of transit-accessible high-rise luxury towers. One of the biggest changes coming to the area will be the recently-proposed Figueroa Centre tower project by architects Callison RTKL. The designers recently revealed a second rendering for their new 66-story tower which, if completed according to plan, will become not only the third-tallest structure in Los Angeles, but also the tallest residential building in the region. The project is slated for 200 condominium units, 220 hotel rooms, and 94,000 square feet of retail spaces. The new tower—it will be located at 925 S. Figueroa Street and rise 975 feet—is part of the large-scale effort to make Los Angeles a better draw for large-scale trade and professional conventions by boosting the overall supply of rental housing and hotel rooms in the areas surrounding the Los Angeles Convention Center and L.A. Live complexes. The city is currently planning to add 8,000 new hotel rooms to those areas, a boom that over the next few years will add a new wing to Downtown Los Angeles’s fledgling skyline. For the most part, the new towers are being built above existing surface parking lots. Up until recently, the city’s downtown skyline was made up mostly of high-rise office towers built in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Over the next ten or so years, however, roughly 20 new towers are due to sprout along Figueroa Street alone, from the foot of L.A.’s newest, tallest tower—the 1,018-foot-tall, A.C. Martin-designed Wilshire Grand Hotel—to the southernmost flank of Interstate-10. Several of those projects are already well under construction, including the Callison RTKL-designed Oceanwide Plaza complex, a $1 billion project consisting of a trio of towers rising between 40- and 49-stories in height. The podium levels of that project are quickly rising out of the ground. Ultimately, the project will contain 150,000 square feet of shopping areas, 504 condominium units, and a 184-key hotel. The twin, 36-story tall Circa towers by Harley Ellis Devereaux are nearly topped-out, according to a time-lapse camera perched over the site. Crews at the Circa site have been snapping curtain wall elements into place over the last few weeks, while crews at the Metropolis project have finished one of that project’s four towers are and are making quick work of the remaining three. A timeline for the Figueroa Centre project has not been announced.
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66-story tower proposed for Downtown Los Angeles

Global architecture firm Callison RTKL and Newport Beach, California–based MJS Landscape Architecture have released a rendering of a new 66-story tall mixed-use residential tower proposed for the bustling entertainment district in Downtown Los Angeles. According to documents submitted to the Los Angeles Planning Department, the project would bring 200 condominium units and a 220-room hotel to 925 S. Figueroa, Urbanize.LA reports. The project would also include 94,000 square feet of retail spaces and parking for 617 automobiles. The project is one of a handful of towers Callison RTKL is currently working on in the Downtown L.A. area, including a 57-story tall,  Jenga-shaped tower proposed for a lot adjacent to Pershing Square. That tower features projecting, cantilevered swimming pools and a sky-lobby. Callison RTKL is also working on the three-towered Oceanwide Plaza, also on Figueroa Street. The new, rectangular tower is set to rise out of a large parking and retail podium. That podium will be topped with recreational uses for hotel guests and condominium residents. The rendering released for the project indicates that like many of the historic high-rise towers across downtown, the monolith will be capped by a flat-topped roof. The arrangement used to be inscribed in local fire code as a safety measure to be utilized in the event tall buildings had to be evacuated via helicopter, but the rule was recently overturned. The project at 925 S. Figueroa marks the 19th high-rise tower proposed or under construction along Figueroa Street in Downtown Los Angeles. Architects Gensler recently revealed plans for an eccentric, 52-story tall tower at the southern edge of this new district. Gensler is also responsible for the Metropolis, 1020 South Figueroa, and Fig+Pico projects along Figueroa. Meanwhile, SOM and P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S are behind the Olympia development, while Harley Ellis Devereaux and Hanson LA are deep into construction on the twin Circa towers. The developments—which track along the Blue and Expo light rail lines and surround the L.A. Live, Staples Center, and Los Angeles Convention Center complexes—are sure to continue to grow in their ranks as the city moves toward building 8,000 new hotel rooms near the Convention Center by 2020.
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Update: Developers for Oceanwide Plaza in Los Angeles release new renderings for $1 billion mega-project

Earlier this week, Oceanwide Real Estate Group revealed plans for the addition of a new Park Hyatt hotel branch to be located at the currently-under-construction Oceanwide Plaza development project in Downtown Los Angeles. Following up on these additional details, the developer has also released a slew of new, glossy renderings by visualization firm Visualhouse for the CallisonRTKL-designed, mixed-use mega-project. The $1-billion development will bring three new towers to the Los Angeles skyline, including a 677-foot hotel spire that will contain two separate pool decks, 184 hotel rooms, and some number of the total 504 condominiums to be located on the 4.6-acre site. The two neighboring, 40-story towers will contain the remaining condo units and will share a rooftop amenity terrace that will the complex’s 100-foot-tall podium of retail space. The podium, dubbed The Collection at Oceanwide Plaza, will be laid out as an indoor-outdoor, multi-level pedestrian mall and is to contain 150,000 square feet of commercial space. The entire complex's retail component will be wrapped by a 32,000-square foot LED ribbon wall. The Oceanwide Plaza project joins a collection of other Chinese developer-backed tower complexes coming to the area, with Greenland USA’s Metropolis and Shenzhen Hazens’s 1020 South Figueroa project, both of which feature retail, hotel, and residential components, taking root on either side of the newly-updated complex. For more information on Oceanwide Plaza, see the developer’s website.
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Park Hyatt luxury hotel added to Oceanwide Plaza development in Los Angeles

Luxury hotelier Park Hyatt announced this week that it has signed up to be a part of Oceanwide Plaza, $1 billion, 1,488,101-square foot, mixed-use development in Downtown Los Angeles. The development would mark the brand's first Los Angeles location. It is unclear whether the Park Hyatt addition will change the project’s fundamental details, but previously-filed plans for Oceanwide Plaza detail the inclusion of 504 condominium units, 153,000-square feet of retail space, and a hotel with 183 guest rooms. The project is being designed by CallisonRTKL and will be contained within a trio of high-rise towers positioned above a mid-rise retail podium outfitted as an indoor-outdoor “galleria”-style mall. A large tower, with a long exposure oriented toward the south, will contain the hotel component while two shorter, east-west oriented towers will contain the condominium units. The podium will be crisscrossed with interior paseos connecting opposing sides of the development site and is to be wrapped in a 32,000-square foot LED ribbon wall that will create a massive, splashy cornice line backing these proposed retail areas. The project will be located at the center of the ever-growing L.A. Live / Staples Center development area that includes the Los Angeles Convention Center, the partially-completed Metropolis complex, as well as many other in-process or upcoming condominium and apartment projects connected by access to Los Angeles’s Blue and Expo light rail transit lines. Located on a 4.6-acre site between 11th and 12th Streets on Figueroa, Oceanwide Plaza broke ground in late 2015 and its construction has necessitated one of the largest concrete mat pours in Los Angeles history, with crews for the construction firm Lendlease pouring an estimated 25,900 cubic yards of concrete and six million pounds of rebar for the complex’s massive foundations earlier this year. The project is expected to be completed by the end of 2018 and will be open to habitation in early 2019. News of the Park Hyatt hotel development was first reported by the Wall Street Journal. UPDATE: Developers for Oceanwide Plaza have released a slew of updated renderings for the project.
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Facades pro Brendan O’Grady on beating the heat in Dallas

CallisonRTKL Vice President Brendan O'Grady views Dallas' hot climate as an opportunity, rather than a challenge, when it comes to facade design. "With the intense summer heat there are numerous opportunities to integrate both passive and active facade design solutions that can reduce the overall environmental impact our buildings have," said O'Grady, who will co-chair October's Facades+ Dallas conference on high performance building design. The city's architects working abroad, moreover, are able to bring lessons learned in other high-heat areas to bear on the local AEC industry. "These firms have the opportunity to take this global perspective and intelligence and apply it to local problems related to facade design and fabrication," he said. Architects, engineers, fabricators, and builders working in the Dallas area excel in digital design and analysis, explained O'Grady. "I would say this is a direct result of the emphasis we are seeing on building performance over pure aesthetics in facade design," he said. On the flip side, "Hearing comments from a recent design awards jury, I would have to say that there is room for improvement in the way a building's program or specific use is reflected in the design of its facade," said O'Grady. "When you look at a building you should be able to tell if it is a hospital versus an office building or an apartment tower." Network with O'Grady and other movers and shakers in the facades world at Facades+ Dallas, October 13-14. Learn more about the first day symposium and the workshops offered on the second day at the conference website. Register today!