Posts tagged with "California":

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Another architectural bookstore bites the dust: Hennessey+Ingalls closes Hollywood location

Art and architecture book nirvana Hennessy + Ingalls closed its Hollywood location on Sunday after just six years in business. The store had been situated in a bow truss structure inside Space 15 Twenty on Cahuenga Boulevard, just north of Sunset. "It's been a struggle from the get-go," said store owner Mark Hennessey, who bought the location a few months before the economy collapsed and finally "decided to pull the plug" after Space 15 Twenty substantially raised the rent. "People are still buying books but they're not buying them in bookstores," he added. "We need a new generation of architecture and design lovers. Right now they're not coming in as often." Hennessy + Ingalls will maintain its Santa Monica location, which Hennessey said is the largest of its kind in the country, but he acknowledged that he's been looking for smaller, more affordable space in Los Angeles's Arts District.
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San Francisco never looked as grand as in this nighttime time lapse video

This black-and-white time-lapse video by Toby Harriman shows San Francisco at its most dramatic. The skyline emerges quietly from its famous fog as the city and its bridges twinkle in the distance—including Leo Villareal's Bay Lights installation. As the music builds, Gotham City SF picks up pace, showing dramatic angles at high speeds completely appropriate for an action thriller. You'd have to watch to really understand. https://vimeo.com/119318850 According to filmmaker Toby Harriman:

This idea came from the aether; it emerged over time. Several years ago (2012) while exploring my passion for black and white photography I found myself wandering into a look I call ‘Gotham’...I have collected and edited this footage while juggling my freelance career and time working at Lytro (a new camera technology).

The film's score was created by UK-based James Everingham and serves to heighten the drama of the city. The Gotham City SF logo was designed by David Hultin.
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Eavesdrop> Don’t call me Shirley! Eric Garcetti lands Airplane! in Downtown Los Angeles

Last month LA Mayor Eric Garcetti attended a screening of his favorite movie, Airplane!, at the historic Million Dollar Theater in downtown Los Angeles. The event included a Q&A with Garcetti and the film’s directors, Jim Abrahams and David and Jerry Zucker. https://youtu.be/07pPmCfKi3U Garcetti, always a student of urban design, talked about how different the city is becoming from the 1980 film rendition in terms of density, transit, diversity, prestige, and overall “urban-ness.” He also couldn’t stop bashing the film’s home base, LAX, promising that it would finally be renovated beyond its 1980s appearance, and that a train would finally get there by the end of the decade. Of course, nobody could figure out which zone was for loading and unloading.
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Nike pops up in Los Angeles’ Arts District, but time is running out

Tomorrow, Saturday, March 28, is the last day to enjoy Nike's Air Max Box pop up at 735 East 3rd Street in LA's Arts District. The installation, inspired by one of the company's shoe boxes and designed to show off the brand's Air Max Zero, is covered with an array of LED displays, projecting kinetic Nike-related graphics. You can even walk inside if you make a reservation, checking out shoes (some viewable under a glass floor, others suspended in what look like pneumatic tubes), and getting a look at working sketches from some of the company's top designers. (Video courtesy Joey Shimoda)
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Peter Zumthor “reins it in” with updates to his Los Angeles art museum proposal

Peter Zumthor's $ 600 million plan for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) is changing. Again. According to a piece in the Los Angeles Times, the sprawling and curving black form has been angled off, weighted to the south, and outfitted with greyish, double-height galleries poking up above the main mass' roofline. The building still swoops over Wilshire Boulevard to avoid disturbing the La Brea Tar Pits, but it will now have just two entrances (instead of seven), at its north and south ends, and its continuous loop of perimeter hallway galleries has been removed. "Peter hasn't given up the curve. But he's really, really reined it in," LACMA Director Michael Govan told the Times. The latest design will be discussed tonight, Wednesday, March 25 at Occidental College, as part of the school's "3rd Los Angeles Project," a series of public events examining the city's move into a "dramatically new phase in its civic development." Members of the panel will include host Christopher Hawthorne, Govan, journalists Greg Goldin and Carolina Miranda, and architects Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee. The Los Angeles Board of Supervisors has approved initial funding of $125 million in bonds (pending approval of the project's EIR), but LACMA still needs to raise about $500 million to make Zumthor's in-progress scheme reality.
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On View> When the Future had Fins: American Automotive Designs and Concepts, 1959-1973

When the Future had Fins: American Automotive Designs and Concepts, 1959-1973 Christopher West Mount Gallery, Pacific Design Center 8687 Melrose Avenue, West Hollywood, CA Through May 20 Once upon a time the American car industry was king. Nothing captures the prestige, aspirations, and mythology of Detroit’s heyday quite like the working sketches and drawings used to develop and promote the land boats we used to call automobiles. _DSC3420-copy A new show at Christopher W. Mount Gallery focuses on sketches from designers at the “Big Three”—General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler—from 1959 to 1973, when those companies were as important as Google, Apple, and Facebook. The sleek, colorful cars with their dynamic angles and large hoods capture the sexiness and muscle that is long gone in today’s car culture. Visionaries like Ford’s John Samsen and GM’s Bill Michalak had a mastery and an expressive craftsmanship on paper that is far removed from the digitized and sanitized world of 21st century rendering.
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Gensler is adding a smaller sibling to the JW Marriott at L.A. Live

Gensler's Los Angeles football stadium may be in trouble (still, not dead), but the firm is busy as ever. Their latest news is the expansion of the JW Marriott and Ritz-Carlton in Downtown Los Angeles, creating the second largest hotel in California. The new 650,000 square foot tower will be directly connected to the existing hotel via a bridge across Olympic Boulevard. The angular building's grid of varied glass will be arranged vertically, in contrast to its sibling's horizontal orientation, and it will not bulge out the way its neighbor does. It will feature a second floor amenity deck including a restaurant, bar, fitness center, executive lounge, and pool area.  Combined with the existing JW Marriott and the Ritz-Carlton Los Angeles, the facility will contain 1,756 rooms and over 200,000 square feet of function space.
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Photographers capture Los Angeles Marathon spotlights shining across the skyline

On March 13, the Los Angeles sky was emblazoned with a trail of upward-facing spotlights, marking every mile of Sunday's Los Angeles Marathon, stretching 26 miles from Echo Park to Santa Monica. The installation, celebrating the event's 30th running, and sponsored and designed by shoe company ASICS, used 124 spotlights, totaling more than 7.5 million lumens. Photos of the light show has appeared all over social media. Our favorite of all comes from Santa Monica photographer Kurt Lawson, who took the shot from the top of the Baldwin Hills Scenic Overlook in Culver City. He stitched together 31 images "with a lot of overlap" to create a panorama of the event including all 26 light beams. The photo, which got over 62,000 views on Flickr in about 24 hours looks similar to a rendering of the event released before it happened (above), but the addition of clouds creates a lively row of dots marking every mile. "You could really make out the trail in the sky," said Lawson. "I got lucky. The clouds were moving quite fast, but I just squeaked it by." Take a look at a few other views below: https://instagram.com/p/0Rino7Enna/ https://instagram.com/p/0MmFWQu-eA/ https://instagram.com/p/0Nw-QbBsPU/ https://instagram.com/p/0MkMhyPZW1/ https://instagram.com/p/0RnKZ6E6ZB/ https://instagram.com/p/0Mxevhyg38/ https://instagram.com/p/0MoYSfLBrD/ https://instagram.com/p/0SqmgniOgJ/ https://instagram.com/p/0MhciEFnFG/
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Synthesis 3D prints a rocking chair

Durotaxis rocker features gradient mesh informed by function, ergonomics, and aesthetics.

For Synthesis Design + Architecture founding principal Alvin Huang, there is a lot to love about 3D printing. But he does not always like how the technology is applied. "I see it all the time—a lot of students just 3D print everything," said Huang, who also teaches at the USC School of Architecture. "You see things that could have been done better, faster, or cleaner by hand. I find it a very troublesome predicament we're in, we're letting the tool dictate." When Stratasys contacted Synthesis about designing a piece for their Objet500 Connex3 printer, the architects decided to turn the relationship between human and machine on its head. Instead of asking how they could implement a preconceived design using the Objet printer, they challenged themselves to create something that could only be manufactured using this particular tool. Durotaxis Chair, a prototype of which debuted at the ACADIA 2014 conference, showcases Objet's multi-material 3D printing capabilities with a gradient mesh that visually communicates the rocker's function and ergonomics. Though Synthesis designed the Durotaxis Chair almost entirely in the digital realm, said Huang, "we see the computer very much as an intuitive tool, the same way previous generations thought of the pencil. We try to find a happy medium between the scientific aspect, and the intuitive manipulation of that science." The architects bounced among multiple software programs including Rhino, Grasshopper, Weaverbird, ZBrush, and Maya to craft a form that operates in two positions: upright, as a traditional rocking chair, and horizontally, as a lounger. The chair's structure comprises an interwoven mesh of two materials, one rigid, opaque, and cyan in color, the other flexible, translucent, and white. While the resultant gradients reflect both the physics and ergonomics of the chair, they also deliver an intended aesthetic effect, creating a moiré pattern that encourages the observer to move around the chair. "It wasn't the case of the code creating the form," explained Huang. "We very clearly sculpted it for visual and ergonomic properties."
  • Fabricator Stratasys
  • Designers Synthesis Design + Architecture
  • Location Los Angeles, CA
  • Date of Completion 2014
  • Material Objet VeroCyan Digital Material, Objet VeroWhite Digital Material
  • Process Rhino, Grasshopper, Weaverbird, ZBrush, Maya, 3D printing
Stratasys manufactured the half-scale prototype at their headquarters in Israel. Unlike a typical 3D printer, which has one head with one nozzle, the Object contains two heads with 96 nozzles each. Using proprietary substances the company calls "digital material," said Huang, "you can print a matrix of gradients between those two heads. In our case, we were able to create gradients not just of color, but also stiffness and transparency." Synthesis remained in constant touch with the Stratasys team throughout fabrication, fine-tuning the design as problems arose. "It was also an experimental process for them," said Huang. "Ultimately, through a lot of back and forth, we were able to arrive at something they were able to print." Synthesis is now tweaking their design for a full-scale version of Durotaxis Chair. The principal challenge they encountered while fabricating the prototype, explained Huang, was an excess of support mesh. "It's still a big manual process. You have to remove all of the support material." The updated design will take advantage of the team's finding that, by printing vertically up to a certain angle, they can eliminate the need for support mesh. "We're trying to take it a step further," said Huang. "How do we expedite the process, and refine the geometry of the lattice so that you're changing direction before the material starts to droop? We're trying to do something where, in a sense, we're growing the chair." Despite his discontent with the way some young practitioners approach 3D printing, Huang thinks that the technology holds great promise, especially in the world of architecture. He points to some of his contemporaries, like fellow Angeleno and architect/jewelry designer Jenny Wu, who is taking 3D printing in exciting new directions. "When you think about architecture and design, most of what we do is the assembly of products, and the more bespoke you can make them, the better," said Huang. "I look at 3D printing as a shift from rapid prototyping to rapid manufacturing. Hopefully someday we can produce bespoke items for the same impact as mass-produced items—that is the theoretical holy grail."
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What does Frank Gehry have planned for Los Angeles’ Sunset Strip?

We've learned from Curbed LA that Frank Gehry is designing a large mixed-use development on LA's Sunset Strip called 8150 Sunset. Located on Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards, the project will be located on the site of an old estate nicknamed the "Garden of Allah." (The lot now contains a strip mall.) According to its Draft Environmental Impact Report (PDF), the new complex, consisting of two buildings sitting on a raised podium, will include 249 apartments, about 100,000 square feet of restaurant and retail space, and a large central plaza. Updated plans and renderings are set to be released this spring, according to developer Townscape Partners. A group called Save Sunset Boulevard is fighting to block the project, calling it a "hideous monstrosity," and attacking its EIR. Among other things the association, which is represented by anti-development lawyer Robert Silverstein, called out the project's potential to add to congestion, dwarf local historic buildings, block views, and waste water and other resources. The glitzy Sunset Strip has become an architect magnet, drawing Lorcan O'Herlihy and SOM (Sunset La Cienega), Ian Schrager, CIM, and several more. It's also been a graveyard of sorts, felling projects by Eric Owen Moss, Hodgetts + Fung, Kanner Architects, and others in recent years.
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Developer and architect Hodgetts+Fung share ideas about Los Angeles’ iconic Norms site

In January AN reported that developer Jason Illouilian (who owns development company Faring Capital) had bought legendary Los Angeles diner Norms, and was considering what to do next with the property. Last week LA Magazine reported that Illouilian plans to build "a community of shops" where the Armet & Davis-designed restaurant's parking lot now stands. He's looking for upscale tenants, like those at the Brentwood Country Mart. (Those include retailers like James Perse and Jenny Kayne and a mix of high-brow and low-brow restaurants and stands.) The developer added that while he hopes to keep the building a 24-hour diner, he noted that it could be "Norms or Somebody else." Culver City–based Hodgetts + Fung are preparing plans for the site. Firm principal Craig Hodgetts confirmed to AN that the firm is considering a two-story development with underground parking next to the original building. "It will certainly not emulate the original building," Hodgetts told AN. The National Trust is very clear about delineating what was original and what is a later addition. "It’s very much a background to Norms. It makes Norms a showpiece." The site has a 1.5 FAR and a 45-foot height limit, he said. He wants to maintain view lines to Norms from La Cienega. "That's pretty darn important," he said. Views from smaller streets might be altered. Hodgetts + Fung will also be renovating Norms, "bringing back its vitality" by bringing back its original paint, tiles, glass, and colors," said Hodgetts. As for whether Norms would be staying, Hodgetts replied: "It's unclear who the operator will be. Given the climate on La Cienega and the parking situation it’s not likely to be a roadside type of service… It's not our decision about the operator. I love Norms. I've had many many chocolate milkshakes there. But the model of a drive in restaurant is not a viable model in a high density urban environment." While Norm's has received a temporary landmark status, LA's Cultural Heritage Commission will vote on March 19 on whether it will receive permanent status. Even with landmark status Illoulian could change the building's owners or use, but he could not tear it down. Hodgetts said that he and Illoulian were being very conscientious about having a dialogue with the community. "We want to go step by step with great care with the conservancy and people who are concerned about the building. We’ll be having conversations with them about our plans before we really have a scheme defined," he noted.
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Architect Tom Wiscombe really lets loose with this space ship of a building in Los Angeles

Last year AN reported that Los Angeles developer Tom Gilmore and LA architect Tom Wiscombe were teaming up to build the Old Bank District Museum in downtown's historic core. The facility, which will showcase Los Angeles–based contemporary artists, will be located inside of—and on top of—the old Farmer's & Merchant's Bank, the Hellman Building, and the Bankhouse Garage at 4th and Main Street. The team has released new renderings of the project, which show in much greater detail how Wiscombe's folded structures will peek over rooftops, punch through floors and walls, and create an entirely new architectural language for its neighborhood. The rooftop sculpture garden (which contains a cafe, a theater, reflecting pools, and multi-level walkways) is where Wiscombe really lets loose, with angular, etched forms that could be confused for spaceships. Enjoy the images below, and we will keep you posted as details emerge.