Posts tagged with "California College of the Arts":

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AN Exclusive: Studio Gang beats out Michael Maltzan and Allied Works to design unified California College of the Arts campus

Chicago-based Studio Gang Architects (SGA) has been selected to design an expansion of the California College of the Arts (CCA) campus in San Francisco, beating out Michael Maltzan Architects and Allied Works for the prestigious commission. Over the next five years, CCA will work with SGA to develop a design for a comprehensive expansion of the existing arts campus to provide educational facilities for the college’s 2,000 students, 600 faculty members, 250 staff members, and 34 academic programs in San Francisco’s Mission Bay neighborhood. The expansion, outlined in the school’s Framing the Future visioning plan developed by Gensler and MKThink in 2015, will aim to absorb the school’s Oakland satellite campus as well as create on-site housing opportunities for students on a site adjacent to the existing San Francisco campus. In a press release announcing SGA’s selection, CCA Board Chair C. Diane Christensen commended the firm’s long list of ground-breaking educational projects, saying, “The selection process was extremely thorough, involving intense review and significant input from many constituencies. Studio Gang’s visionary work, commitment to innovation and sustainability, and collaborative work style makes the firm an excellent fit for this project and for CCA. Jeanne Gang leads an extraordinary team that is very familiar with San Francisco and our still-emerging neighborhood at the intersection of the city’s innovation corridor, the new DoReMi arts district, and Mission Bay. We are thrilled with the prospect of working with Studio Gang and have high hopes that our new campus will help redefine 21st-century arts education.” Studio Gang CCA Unified Campus from Architect's Newspaper on Vimeo. In the same press release, Jeanne Gang, founding principal at SGA, focused on intrinsic potential for the project to yield innovative educational synergies, remarking, “We are excited to discover with CCA the possibilities that a unified campus in San Francisco presents for the future of art teaching, learning, and making,” adding, “The site has enormous potential to build an expanded, increasingly connected campus for CCA in a newly thriving design district. We are looking forward to a creative and engaged design process to help CCA continue to change the world through dynamic arts education.”
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Allied Works, Michael Maltzan, and Studio Gang compete for California College of the Arts campus design

Allied Works Architecture (AWA), Michael Maltzan Architects (MMA), and Studio Gang Architects (SGA) have been selected as finalists to design a new campus for California College of the Arts (CCA). The architects are vying to design a new extension to the school’s San Francisco campus that would unify the institute’s 2,000 students, 600 faculty, 250 staff members and 34 academic programs on one site. Currently, CCA’s students and programs are split between a campus in San Francisco and one in nearby Oakland, California. The new campus expansion would grow on a 2.4-acre lot bordering the existing facilities in San Francisco and would be developed over the following five years. The project also aims to address San Francisco’s housing crisis by supplying roughly 1,000 beds of on- or near-campus housing by 2025, a healthy increase over the 500 currently available beds split between the two existing campuses. The expansion will have a heavy emphasis on sustainable design practices, with the college citing the inclusion of sustainability strategies for water and energy generation, usage, and conservation, air quality, and environmentally safe art-making materials and practices as central tenets of the expansion. CCA will also engage in an effort to preserve the school’s current Oakland campus, which dates back to 1922. The university aims to redevelop that property, the historic Treadwell Estate, in a way that might “reflect and amplify CCA's legacy,” including, potentially, some sort of “mission-aligned” use like affordable housing or as the location of an educational institution. The planned expansion comes after several years of architect-guided planning at CCA, with architectural firms Gensler and MKThink producing a strategic framework for planning for the campus in 2015 that was followed by year-long comment period seeking to engage professors and students, alumni, and trustees. Following the comment period, San Francisco—based Jensen Architects created a space-planning guide from the Gensler and MKThink report that was then used to vet potential architecture firms, with the resulting selection of AWA, MMA, and SGA indicating the school is ready to move onto the next phase of fielding proposals from each team. In a press release announcing the finalists’ selection, CCA President Stephen Beal stated, “This is the moment for CCA to elevate and scale our distinctive, learn-through-making educational model by unifying our campuses to improve the student experience. We will develop future creative leaders and reimagine higher education on a campus like no other—one built with advanced measures of sustainability where every workspace, public space, and landscape serves as a living, learning laboratory for collaboration, risk-taking, and experimentation. We are looking forward to finding a partner architectural firm that can help us realize this vision.”

Celebrating Architectural League Emerging Voices

Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus

Free and open to the public Reception and book signing to follow discussion More info: architecture@cca.edu

Since 1982, the Architectural League of New York has sponsored Emerging Voices, a juried lecture series recognizing architects, landscape architects, and urban designers whose distinctive voices promise to influence the field of architecture.

This year, the League published 30 Years of Emerging Voices, a survey of honorees with essays interpreting the transformations in architectural discourse, design, and practice that this roster reveals.

Join the conversation by attending this panel discussion featuring principals from all of the Emerging Voices firms currently practicing in the San Francisco Bay Area. Thirteen leading architects and landscape architects will share their current visions for the field and reflect on their practice trajectories in a conversation moderated by Allison Arieff, editorial director at SPUR, and featuring the League’s executive director, Rosalie Genevro, and Emerging Voices program director, Anne Rieselbach. The presenters, many of whom teach at CCA, UC Berkeley, and other schools, are founding principals of some of the Bay Area's most distinguished practices: Anderson Anderson Architecture, Faulders Studio, Fernau & Hartman Architects, Guthrie + Buresh Architects, Iwamoto Scott, Kuth Ranieri Architects, Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects,Ogrydziak Prillinger Architects, Pfau Long Architecture, Rael San Fratello, Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects Inc., SurfaceDesign Inc., and VeeV Design.
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“Creative Architecture Machines” Dissects Maker Culture at California College of the Arts

On November 2nd a group of architects, builders, students, makers, educators, inventors and designers packed in for the Creative Architecture Machines Colloquium at California College of the Arts. The talk was organized by Jason Kelly Johnson of Future Cities Lab and brought together five practices working at the intersection of fabrication, computation, and making. Johnson led off the evening with an introduction to the practices and ideas behind maker culture; waxing philosophical on digital fabrication, the ubiquity of 3D printers and the future vision of what cutting edge Architecture offices will look like, complete with their own robot arms, of course. Joshua Zabel of Kreysler & Associates followed with some striking imagery and thoughts on new and old projects. Kreysler is fabricating the rippled composite rain screen for the new SFMOMA addition by Snøhetta and has been working at the forefront of composite technology for the past three decades. Andrew Atwood of Atwood-A and First Office traced the development of what we now know as the ubiquitous rendered image and brought with him a series of exploratory and experimental drawings and images that questioned and poked fun at current forms of representation. Returning to the realm of fabrication and material science Ron Rael of Rael-SanFratello and Emerging Objects spoke on the necessity to explore the materials (from pulverized recycled tire rubber to salt) that comprise the radical forms that architects and designers are pushing today. Fedor Novikov of Labori Construction Robotics spoke to the projects that he and his brother Petr are involved with at the IAAC,  involving robots and 3D printed substances. Their dynamic Mataerial project which they have dubbed “anti-gravity object modeling,” allows freeform plastic extruded from a robot arm to attach to virtually any surface as it cures on contact through a chemical process (through the use of thermosetting polymers) within the material instead of less death-defying substances commonly found in 3D printers. Ending the evening were Brandon Kruysman and Jonathan Proto of Bot & Dolly (recently acquired by Google), best known for their role in the Oscar-winning film Gravity. They shared work from their short film Box, which explores the intersection of projection mapping, robotics, and film making and its origins in their experiments at the Robot House at Sci-Arc. The evening concluded with a panel discussion that touched on  intellectual property, open source platforms, behavioral studies, sustainability, and the ethos of technology. The atmosphere remained electric as the speakers and audience compared their notes and predictions for the foreseeable robotic futures that we are surrounded with.
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Moving West: Jonathan Massey To Direct California College of the Art’s Architecture Department

In the second significant departure this week from the Syracuse University School of Architecture, professor Jonathan Massey has been named the Director of Architecture at California College of the Arts (CCA). Massey, who chaired the Bachelor of Architecture program at Syracuse from 2007 to 2011, succeeds Ila Berman in the position. Although he spent four years in Los Angeles, Massey is new to San Francisco, and admitted, "I still have a lot to learn." So far he said he's impressed with the school's focus on digital craft, its ability to "tap into a broader Bay Area culture of innovation," its diversity of offerings, and its commitment to social justice. While it's too early to set out an agenda, Massey is interested in plugging faculty and students' digital skills into a larger framework, through municipal data, social media, and other means. He wants to connect a strength in formalism with political and social issues—what he called "socially engaged formalism—and he would like to expand the school's regional and global partnerships. Many of these initiatives, he posited, are likely already there, but may be "ready to be developed further." Massey holds a doctorate in the history of theory and architecture from Princeton, a master of architecture from UCLA, and a bachelor of arts from Princeton.
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Event> Blueprints, Blue Jeans & Bluegrass in San Francisco

cca-blue-01   The California College of the Arts (CCA) was founded in 1907 by Frederick Meyer, a German arts and crafts cabinetmaker and did not have an architecture program until the 1980s. However it has been making great strides in the past 10 years to become more of a presence on the international art and design stage. But like all schools it struggles with rising fees and costs to educate young people so it has come up with Blueprints, Blue Jeans & Bluegrass, a fundraiser that will take place in its fantastic San Francisco campus. The party will honor Art Gensler the founder of the San Francisco firm that bares his name. All net proceeds from the gala will go to scholarships for talented and deserving students at CCA. The event takes place on March 26 and features a complete dinner, fancy cocktails and Bluegrass music. I want to fly out to San Francisco just to attend the Blueprints.
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On View> An Olfactory Archive: Something Smells at the California College of the Arts

The architecture school at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco was only founded in 1986 and did not have its own campus until 1997. But the school—housed in a light filled old bus shed in the city's Potrero Hill Design District—is quickly carving out a unique role for itself as a center of architectural creativity and pedagogy. The College, with its dynamic president and acting director of architecture David Gissen, seems to be trying to work forward from its Arts and Crafts traditions (the CCA itself was founded in 1907 in Oakland) but link up with the vibrant and young tech industries and attitude that proliferate in this south of Market area. A sign of this new spirit is a small but fascinating exhibit, An Olfactory Archive: 1738-1969, curated by Gissen and new faculty member Irene Cheng and designed by Brian Price and Matt Hutchinson. The exhibit, Cheng claims, is "an in-depth, sensory exploration of one mode of experimental history: olfactory reconstruction." It features the work of several architects, designers and "perfumers" who focus on reconstructing historical scents. It includes Jorge Otero-Pailos, who reconstructs in the show of the odors of the Glass House, and Aaron Betsky and Herzog and DeMeuron's fragrance, "Rotterdam-Olfactory Object from 2004." The impetus for the show is the work done by Alain Corbin and Dell Upton, who both have highlighted the importance of odor as a historical force, from early nineteenth-century fears of miasmatic contagion to more recent concerns about air quality and pollution. In addition to the exhibit CCA will host Test Sites: Experiments in the History of Space, a symposium devoted to exploring other alternative historical practices such as reconstructions, counterfactual histories, new media, critical conservation, and even destruction. It will feature Lucia Allais, Keller Easterling, Amy Balkin, Amy Balkin, Nicholas de Monchaux, Jorge Otero-Pailos, and Mark Wasiuta. The symposium will take place CCA's Timken Auditoirium on Saturday, October 12 from 10am to 5pm. The exhibit runs through October 13.
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CCA Launches Three New Masters Programs for 2013

Thinking about getting a masters degree but haven’t found the right field? California College of the Arts (CCA) in San Francisco just made it easier, announcing three new graduate programs beginning in 2013, bringing the total number of post-professional offerings to eleven. The trio of curricula includes: a Master of Architecture in Urban Design and Landscape (MAUDL), a MFA in Comics, and a MFA in Film. The two-year MAUDL focuses on the future of urbanism and teaches a range of urban design strategies and data-visualization techniques. The three-year MFA in Comics is headed by Eisner-nominated graphic novelist Matt Silady. And CCA’s MFA in Film specializes in multidisciplinary approaches. Classes begin Fall 2013. Applications for all three programs are being accepted now through January 5, 2013 at www.cca.edu.
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Prefab Alpolic Units: Rapid type and SUM

Fabrikator Brought to you by: 

A coffee stand prototype explores new possibilities for small-scale modular construction.

As part of a push to get its products into the hands of young architects, the Alpolic division of Mitsubishi Plastics sponsored a spring design/build studio entitled “Rapid type” at the California College of the Arts (CCA). The goal was for 15 students, led by CCA adjunct architecture professors Andre Caradec and Kory Bieg, to explore new design uses and assembly techniques for Alpolic aluminum composite materials (ACM), which are most commonly used for exterior cladding and signage. The students had at their disposal not only the school’s resources, but also those of Bieg’s San Francisco-based design and fabrication firm OTA+ and Caradec’s Oakland-based design and fabrication firm, Studio Under Manufacture (SUM). Given the college’s location at the nexus of a burgeoning San Francisco food truck scene and students’ proclivity for caffeine, the team landed on design of a mobile coffee service unit as a means of testing Alpolic’s limits.
  • Fabricators Rapid type, Studio Under Manufacture
  • Designers OTA+, Rapid type, Studio Under Manufacture
  • Location San Francisco, California
  • Status Prototype
  • Material Alpolic
  • Process 3-axis CNC mill
The team envisioned a structure that was reliable and cost-effective while bringing a higher level of design and prefabrication to the food truck industry, which has received a boost in Northern California due to relaxed permitting and code requirements. After feasibility and marketing studies, the team began to design a rolling steel structure wrapped in a waffle grid of Alpolic. The cart would shade employees inside while incorporating a wraparound counter that would allow customers to linger or talk shop with the barista after placing their order. Though an encircling plywood base supports the grid structure overhead, the interior is floorless; employees stand on the ground at the same level as patrons. “It also makes cleanup easier,” jokes Caradec. The 9-by-11-by-8-foot structure sits on industrial casters, allowing it to be pulled into place by a vehicle or by hand. The team designed the cart’s waffle grid in Rhino, with each rib section connecting the corresponding perpendicular section with a long notch. After assembling a scale cardboard model, fabrication of 80 ribs from sheets of 62-by-196-inch Mist White Alpolic began in SUM’s shop using a three-axis CNC mill. Exterior plywood shear panels and ribs for the counter and service window structure were milled on the same machine. Those ribs were then wrapped in waterjet-cut 16-gauge mild steel to create the completed work surface. Once interior Alpolic milling was complete, exterior plywood was installed over the hollow steel frame and final measurements for exterior ribs were verified before milling. After interior and exterior structures were built, the countertop structure was put into place. The entire project was manufactured and assembled in less than a week—in time for the students’ final review, complete with coffee service. Caradec’s firm recently applied a similar concept to a prefabricated studio. The design is the workspace version of the coffee station, an 8-by-10-by-8-foot-high office for a writer who requested that the space allow him to recline, sit, and stand during the workday. Like the coffee station, the box is built with white Alpolic sheets, but these have been routed on one side, then folded to create a faceted shape. Because of the panels’ construction, they create a hermetic exterior even after folding. A 14-inch marine-grade teak window wraps the structure, creating visibility from any position. The coffee station prototype design has already received attention from investors interested in putting a line of prefabricated food service stations into production. And other iterations, like the writers studio, could create a new generation of prefabricated structures for a range of applications. “The design can be based on the environment it’s going into,” says Caradec.