Posts tagged with "Buro Happold":

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EVENT> Collaboration: A Conference on The Art and Science of Facades, July 26-27 in SF

Collaboration: The Art and Science of Facades Symposium: Thursday, July 26, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. UCSF Mission Bay Conference Center, San Francisco Workshops: Friday, July 27, 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. California College of the Arts, San Francisco This week in San Francisco architects and engineers at the forefront of facade design and fabrication will gather to present their latest work and research. Sponsored by The Architect's Newspaper and Enclos, the first-day line-up for Collaboration: The Art and Science of Facades includes Craig Dykers of Snohetta as the keynote speaker along with presentation by leaders at SOM,  Thornton Thomasetti, Firestone Building Products, IwamotoScott, Future Cities Lab, Gensler, Kreysler & Associates, Gehry Technologies, Buro Happold and more. On the second day, participants receive hands-on practical instruction through workshops with industry leaders. Those attending both days will receive 16 AIA Continuing Education credits. One day left to register! For registration click here. Can't make it out West this week? Check out the next call for papers: AN's Facades + Innovation Conference, October 10-12, Chicago. Download PDF.
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Zaha Hadid shortlisted to build icon in her home country

Zaha Hadid. BD Online is reporting that architect Zaha Hadid has been shortlisted for the $1 billion new home of the Iraqi parliament. The project will be built on a site of the former Al Muthana airport once slated for Saddam Hussein's partially constructed super-mosque in central Baghdad. The finalists haven't officially been made public, but Iraqi-born Hadid is on the list along with Buro Happold and AECOM. Designs are due in July and a winner will be announced at the end of the year.
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A really BIG mosque

Just when you thought  architecture juggernaut Bjarke Ingels and his firm BIG couldn't win YET another commission in YET another country... the firm announced yesterday that it had beat out competitors including Zaha Hadid to lead the construction of a new cultural center in Albania's capital, Tirana. The complex will consist of a mosque, an Islamic Centre, and a Museum of Religious Harmony. The design team is made up of BIG, Martha Schwartz Landscape, Buro Happold, Speirs & Major lighting, Lutzenberger & Lutzenberger, and Global Cultural Asset Management. A triangular site plan is divided into the three main components, all carved away to form a central plaza oriented toward Mecca. The public plaza, among other things, is meant to make the religion more "inclusive and inviting," the firm said in a statement. And since it's located next to the city's newly-completed Orthodox and Catholic Cathedrals, it makes Tirana "an example for the rest of the world as a global capital of religious harmony." Nobody said BIG didn't aim high... If you'd like a closer look the team has (of course) put together a video of their proposal, with music by The XX.  
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Celebrating Sustainability at Chicago's Art Institute

On November 17, The Architect's Newspaper and Buro Happold, along with our other event partners Dow Building Solutions, Graphisoft, American Hydrotech, and Adaptive Building Initiative, celebrated GreenBuild at the Art Institute of Chicago's Modern Wing. Renzo Piano's LEED certified building proved to be a stylish venue for the hundreds of architects, engineers, designers, and other assorted revelers. Click through for pictures of some of the evening's hundreds of party-goers. It was quite the green scene!
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San Diego Crossing Gets Green Lighting Scheme

California State Route 75 is getting a whole lot snazzier. The 2.5-mile-long San Diego–Coronado Bay Bridge is set to undergo the “largest interactive green energy lighting project in North America.” An international team led by London-based artist Peter Fink (FoRM Associates) and lighting designer Mark Major (Speirs + Major) plus the LA-based office of engineering consultant Buro Happold have won a worldwide contest to illuminate the iconic, swooping girder bridge, opened in 1969. The team’s design incorporates energy-neutral LED lighting powered by wind turbines. The lighting will respond to the rate and intensity of automobile traffic on the bridge, as well as major boat traffic across its 1,880-foot shipping channel, and aims to emphasize the San Diego–Coronado Bay Bridge’s importance as a gateway between communities. The Port of San Diego and the California Department of Transportation chose the team’s scheme over two other finalists, including the French lighting design firm Bideau Company and a proposal from environmental artist Ned Kahn and Patrick McInerney Architects with engineering consultants Arup. Bideau Company, which has lit the Eiffel Tower and the Acropolis, proposed a moving zig-zag LED pattern projected along the length of the bridge, loosely based on designs found on pottery by the Kumeyaay Indian tribe. Ned Kahn/Patrick McInerney Architects with Arup proposed a series of clever wind and light sculptures situated in the void of each of the bridge’s inverted V-shaped girders. Check out videos for all three submissions courtesy the Port of San Diego.
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Behind the scenes at Canstruction LA

AN recently took a sneak peak at late night preparations for the fifth annual Canstruction LA, a charitable design competition—whose pieces are currently on display in the lobby of 5900 Wilshire Boulevard— that taps teams of architects, designers, builders and engineers to create large-scale sculptures using canned goods (and even a few water bottles) that will eventually be donated to the Los Angeles Regional Foodbank. What we found was a furor of activity, many boxes of pizza, and a bit of competitive banter among teams. “It’s like Christmas morning,” said Damian Carroll, one of the founders of Canstruction LA. The eight teams worked way past their normal office hours putting together their closely guarded designs. “You’ll see them, going to peek  at the other ones and thinking, ‘What are they building? What is that thing?'” said Carroll.  And how do these firms get all these cans? “You get to know the store managers really well,” said Cassandra Coffin of HKS Architects, the team that brought a yellow-skinned Despicable Me minion to life this year. This year’s awards went to: JURORS’ FAVORITE: “Can-on Picture a World Without Hunger” by Gensler and Arup
Defending champions Gensler and Arup used more than 4,000 cans for their larger- -than-life DSLR camera. They also stepped up their game by incorporating a live feed and a viewfinder that displays messages about hunger. STRUCTURAL INGENUITY: “CANcave/CANvex” by HMC Architects and Buro Happold Engineers The Richard Serra sculptures housed at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art across the street inspired these architects and engineers as they gave life to this undulating, complex shape. BEST MEAL: “Not So Hungry Hungry Hippo” by RTKL Associates This entry that plays off a popular children’s game comprise of a pasta course, a fish entrée, vegetable sides and even fruit for dessert. BEST USE OF LABELS: “CANucopia” by Perkins & Will Choosing cans with labels in natural tones, Perkins & Will recalled the bounty of nature. Find out what the other teams have in store and vote for the last remaining award: Cheri Melillo People's Favorite Award. 5900 Wilshire Boulevard is across the street from LACMA at the lobby of the Variety building until November 6. Admission is free, but bringing a can for donation is highly encouraged.
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Unforgettable Stage

Engineering firm Buro Happold is known for designing innovative structures. The glazed canopies it suspended above the courtyards of the Smithsonian and the British Museum baffle the mind with their seeming lightness. And the Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic, on which the firm collaborated with fellow UK native Grimshaw, introduced upstate New York to some of the most space-age forms it has seen since Whitley Streiber's Communion. Now the firm—along with designers Hoberman Associates and Innovative Designs—has turned its expertise to the world of rock and roll with its structural design for an expanding 4,000-square-foot video screen that will accompany U2 on their current 360º tour. Made up of 888 LED panels (500,000 pixels) the screen weighs 32 tons, can expand and contract from 23 feet tall to 72 feet tall in 90 seconds, and can be assembled in 8 hours and broken down into portable pieces in 6 hours. More pics and some videos after the jump. The expanding video screen debuted on June 30th in Barcelona, Spain. It will open in America on September 12th in Chicago's Soldier Field. A video mock-up of screen produced by Stufish. The screen in action on opening night in Barcelona.