Posts tagged with "Brooklyn":

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ODA’s jewel-like facade in DUMBO clears Landmarks hurdle on second try

  The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission has given its blessing to ODA's jewel-like faceted facade for a factory-to-condo conversion on the Dumbo waterfront. The firm first presented its plans for 10 Jay Street last month, and while it was well received, commissioners didn't think the dramatic, glassy design was a perfect fit for the historic neighborhood.   So the firm took that into account and added more steel and brick elements into its design. And with that—permission was granted. Curbed reported that the sugar crystal-design of the facade was inspired by the building's history as a sugar refinery. The commission had previously approved ODA's plans to restore the building's other three sides. Check out the fly-through below to get a better sense of the design—albeit, the earlier version of the design. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hlLQ6DLy44c According to the Real Deal, demolition is slated to start May 1 and completion is planned for Fall 2016.
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ODA unveils amenity-packed zigzagging rental building in Bushwick

ODA has unveiled renderings for a massive new residential complex in Bushwick, Brooklyn—and it certainly reminds us of Bjarke Ingels’ 8 House in Copenhagen with its doughnut-like shape and landscaped roof that dips toward the street. At nearly 400,000 square feet, ODA’s 10 Montieth Street will become a major piece in the redevelopment of the Rheingold Brewery site.   The 392-unit rental building is quite obviously geared toward younger tenants that have been flocking to the neighborhood in recent years. Above the building’s apartments—most of which are studios or one-bedrooms—is that 25,000-square-foot roof, which packs more amenities than a three-day Carnival Cruise. According to the Real Deal, 10 Montieth’s zigzagging roof has a “running/hiking course, urban farming areas and an outdoor cross-training facility.” There is also apparently a “chill space” and some graffiti walls so renters can take the edge off if urban farming isn’t going as planned. They could also probably use the 19,000-square-foot courtyard as a “chill space.” Good to have options. The building’s protruding volumes and balconies give it the boxy design aesthetic we have come to expect from ODA. The geometric exterior is primarily clad in light gray stone or concrete and has pronounced orange window frames. ODA adds contrast to the project by using darker materials on the sections of the building that are set back from the street.  
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Brooklyn Building Defects: Building boom leads to building problems

Many of the new condominiums erected in Brooklyn during the last building boom are not aging well. The New York Times reported that “[w]hen the housing market collapsed in 2007 and coffers ran dry, many developers were left scrambling to complete projects. Some cut corners or abandoned developments, leaving others to finish the work.” This led to poorly constructed buildings and angry residents who are stuck dealing with mold, cracking balconies, and flooding. One such building even saw part of its facade fall off. Now many of the developers behind the shoddy buildings are breaking ground on new projects, hopefully with more attention to quality.
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Eavesdrop> Ferry Fiasco: Ice shuts down ferry service on New York City’s East River

  As AN reported, it will be quite difficult for New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio to pull off his plan to launch a five-borough ferry system. There are, of course, the obvious issues surrounding subsidies, ridership, operators, and dock placement that could all cause major headaches down the road. While the mayor starts charting his path through these details, another potential problem came to the fore: winter weather. https://vimeo.com/119709319 Specifically, a partially frozen East River. Just weeks after de Blasio announced his five-borough ferry plan, Gothamist reported that the East River Ferry had to discontinue service at least once because boats could not make it through the ice. On its website, New York Waterway, which operates the East River Ferry, explained that the river (technically an estuary) is extremely unpredictable over the winter and that conditions can change within minutes. This, it said, can disrupt the schedule and lead to the temporary closure of certain stops. “We hope that you can understand,” it wrote on its site, “and won’t hate us forever.” It is not you we hate, East River Ferry operator, it is this never-ending winter. https://twitter.com/eastriverferry/status/567044595859869696 https://twitter.com/eastriverferry/status/569922481802375168
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Brooklyn protestors use “light graffiti” to urge Bill de Blasio to fund long-promised park

As AN recently reported, a fire that destroyed a warehouse in Williamsburg, Brooklyn has rekindled questions about a long-promised waterfront park. Back in 2005, Michael Bloomberg rezoned much of Williamsburg and Greenpoint leading to a surge in glassy towers. With those towers was supposed to come Bushwick Inlet Park, a 28-acre green space along the East River. But in the decade since, only parts of the park have been completed. That is partly because when the city rezoned the waterfront, it didn't purchase the 11-acre Citistorage property that sits in the middle of the planned park. Now, with one of the warehouses destroyed, local residents and elected officials are urging the de Blasio administration to finally acquire the lot and deliver more green space. But with the property reportedly valued between $75 million and $100 million, the de Blasio administration says it has no plans to do so. In spite of that, over the weekend protesters used "light graffiti" to urge the administration to change course. Gothamist reported that images were projected on the side of a storage facility next to the charred site that read: "The city mapped it, designed it, and promised it and we need it more than ever,"  "Hey de Blasio Where's Our Park?" and "This Right Here is Supposed to be a Park." There were also details displayed about an upcoming rally planned outside City Hall on Thursday. The event in Williamsburg brings us back to 2011 when Occupy Wall Street protesters projected so-called "bat signals" on the side of the Verizon Building next to the Brooklyn Bridge.
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MTA Off Track: Record ridership just one of the problems facing New York City transit

Overcrowding on New York City subway trains is becoming a major problem for commuters. According to new data from the MTA, there were 14,843 weekday delays caused by overcrowding in December alone. The New York Post found that the number is up 113 percent from the same period a year ago. Fixing the overcrowding will not be easy for the MTA as it is trying to accommodate record ridership and still dealing with damage from Superstorm Sandy.
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SHoP Architects’ first tower at Brooklyn’s Domino Sugar site breaks ground with a refined design

As AN has been reporting for a while now, it's all systems go for the long-stalled Domino Sugar Factory redevelopment on the Brooklyn waterfront. Crews have been demolishing old structures on the site for months, and today we got word that the developer, Two Trees, is breaking ground on the massive project's first residential building: a 16-story, 500-unit rental building designed by SHoP, which is designing the entire project. In a press release, the developer noted that "approximately 105" of the 500 units will be designated as affordable. With news of the groundbreaking also comes a new rendering of the building that gives us a better sense of its design. While its overall form appears to be roughly the same, with terraces that create a cascading effect, its materials have clearly changed. Atop a masonry podium, SHoP said the building will be clad in industrial materials like zinc and copper. The building is slated to be completed in 2017. Two Trees also announced that it's starting to repair the site's waterfront pier to accommodate an upcoming 5-plus acre public park designed by James Corner Field Operations. This prep work is expected to take between 12 and 18 months.
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Brooklyn’s 56 Bogart is at the center of the New York City art world

  If the address 56 Bogart in Brooklyn means nothing to you then you're missing the center of the art world in New York City in 2015. Forget about Chelsea and the Bowery, Bushwick and East Williamsburg are the most exciting exhibition outposts in the city and maybe in the country. It's Soho 40 years ago as any Saturday afternoon stroll along Bogart Street will make clear with its cafes, bars, restaurants and working artists lofts on every block. The 56 Bogart gallery Black and White, for example, was founded in New York in 2002. Its mandate is to cultivate "promising artists in the initial and more advanced phases of their careers." The gallery started in an industrial ground-floor space in Brooklyn and from 2006 to 2010 had two locations—Williamsburg and Chelsea. In 2010 the Chelsea gallery closed and not-for-profit Black & White Project Space was established in Brooklyn. Now after a two-year hiatus, the Project Space is at 56 Bogart Street and the first show in its new space, Henry Khudyakov Final Brain Storm, is a survey of the Russian-born, 85-year-old artist and poet's nearly forty year career in the United States. That's unique and ambitious for a small gallery like Black and White. The gallery is a perfect place to spend a Saturday afternoon.
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With slight alterations, controversial Brooklyn Bridge Park development to start back up

In our recent story about the current development surge happening in and around Dumbo, we touched on the controversy surrounding the Pierhouse—an under-construction hotel and condo complex next to the Brooklyn Bridge. The Marvel Architects–designed building, which will help cover Brooklyn Bridge Park's maintenance costs, has riled up local residents who say it is blocking their views of the iconic bridge. The Pierhouse was expected to top out at 100 feet, but was pushed about 30 feet higher due to a bulkhead. The Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation (BBPC) maintains that the building's design is exactly what was presented to the community in 2013. But facing growing criticism, the BBPC went ahead and asked the site's developer to double-check that the building fully complied with the Brooklyn Heights Scenic View District. So at the end of January, the Department of Buildings filed a stop work order at the site so everything could be evaluated. Now, a few weeks later, work is expected to pick back up at the Pierhouse, but with a few concessions in regards to height. A spokesperson for the project told the website New York YIMBY that two parapet walls will be removed and the building will be lowered by 1.5 feet.
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The 2016 Democratic National Convention to be held in Philadelphia

Hillary Clinton will not be named the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, as Mayor Bill de Blasio had hoped. No, that will likely happen at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, as the Democratic National Committee has announced that the City of Brotherly Love will host its 2016 national convention. The expected anointing of Hillary will happen during the week of July 25, just days after the Republicans meet in Cleveland, Ohio to nominate—who knows—Jeb Bush? Clinton versus Bush. What a world.
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Snøhetta completes warehouse-to-gallery conversion in Gowanus, Brooklyn

Snøhetta, the Norwegian firm known for big, dramatic buildings around the globe, has completed a more modest project in Gowanus, Brooklyn: the conversion of a warehouse into a studio and gallery space for José Parlá, a Cuban-American artist and painter. The new space is separated into two defined spaces known as the “Arena” and the “Nest.” The “Arena” is where Parlá can showcase his work, like the mural ONE: Union of the Senses, which is now on display in the lobby of One World Trade Center. And as for the “Nest,” Snøhetta describes that as “a cozy mezzanine [that] provides a relaxing space for the artist to take distance from his work, and an elevated location to view his paintings from a new perspective.” Artists, right? Snøhetta's renovation retains much of the building's industrial past, including its ceilings and concrete floors; the building's brick exterior has largely been preserved as well, but now includes rolling doors to accommodate large pieces of art. Inside, walls are painted grey to highlight the artist's work and old skylights have been opened up to increase natural light.
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Save the date! Here’s your first sneak peek of NYCxDESIGN 2015

We might be in the thick of winter, but planning is already underway for the third annual NYCxDESIGN coming up in the Spring. On Thursday morning, organizers—NYC & Company and the NYC Economic Development Corporation—invited members of the design community, fittingly, to the newly opened and revamped Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum to kick off the week-long, citywide design festivities taking place May 8–19. The program offers a platform to more than 40,000 designers and 3,900 design firms practicing in the city to showcase their work. Over the course of 12 days, a variety of exhibitions, installations, panel discussions, and open studios will be held in venues throughout Manhattan and Brooklyn. Six returning events anchor the program, including: BKLYN DESIGNS (May 8–10), WantedDesign Brooklyn (May 1–19), Collective Design (May 13–17), Frieze Art Fair (May 14–17), WantedDesign Manhattan (May 15–18), and ICFF (May 16–19). The opening night of BKLYN Designs will be the official launch of NYCxDESIGN. If last year's impressive turnout of 2,000-plus listings at 181 venues is telling, then May 2015 will be a busy one for those in the design sector.