Posts tagged with "Bronze":

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David Chipperfield’s Classical display cabinets take a cue from the Ionic column

Looking for a tasteful way to show off your collection of iconic postmodern teapots or architect-designed shoes? David Chipperfield may have the answer. Debuting during the London Design Festival, the "Ionic" display cases find the architect comfortably ordering classical bronze columns and ribbed glass panels. The cabinets have been developed for the David Gill Gallery. "David Gill encouraged me to think to create furniture outside of the normal commercial criteria—the furniture industry is interested in methods of production that are economical and where pieces sit within the marketplace—be that a sofa or a coffee table," Chipperfield said in a statement. "With David Gill, we were able to operate outside the conventional commercial furniture system. It was strange, and yet very interesting." The project evokes the fantasy of architects everywhere: the dream client, with little to no restrictions on vision and budget. "I still wanted to make a utilitarian object but didn't see utility as its primary concern—or the economy of means," Chipperfield continued. "I didn't have to worry about how it was made, just to make something beautiful out of beautiful materials, such as casting and bronze; things that normally lie beyond the possibilities of the commercial process and invest the object with a strong physical presence."
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Learning in the Round by Heatherwick Studio

A custom concrete curtain wall complements a Singapore university building's unique form.

The new Learning Hub at Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore looks nothing like a typical campus building. School administrators conceived of the facility as the embodiment of a pedagogical sea change, and commissioned London-based Heatherwick Studio to design an iconic structure emphasizing small-group learning and cross-disciplinary interaction. Eschewing perpendicular classrooms and isolated corridors, the architects developed a unique plan in which rounded meeting rooms are arrayed around a central atrium. The Learning Hub's textured concrete facade, punctuated by zig-zags of glazing and pockets of greenery, translates the interior program to the building's exterior, and announces the arrival at NTU of a new way of teaching and learning. The Learning Hub's plan, said project leader Ole Smith, "is basically the whole story of the design." The first challenge was to accommodate a radical departure in the university's mode of instruction. In lieu of traditional master classes, students meet in groups of six with a professor as facilitator. NTU asked Heatherwick Studio to eliminate corners where possible; once the architects observed that the classes would meet at round tables, the next step was to consider rounding the classrooms themselves. Knowing that the windows in the classrooms would need to be small in order to reduce thermal gain, they looked for another way for students to connect with one another and decided upon a central courtyard. "That was part of the brief as well, to enable the students to mix," said Smith. "It's the only building on the campus of 33,000 where they all come together. Art students might have class next to math or engineering students; the hope is that they'll meet up and inspire each other, or develop a business plan together."
  • Facade Manufacturer LWC Alliance Pte. Ltd.
  • Architects Heatherwick Studio
  • Facade Installer LWC
  • Location Singapore
  • Date of Completion 2015
  • System textured concrete curtain wall with zig-zag glazing, bronze-mesh balconies and staircases
  • Products custom LWC concrete panels, glazing, bronze mesh, hydroponic plants
Singapore's stringent environmental standards necessitated the use of concrete on the building's facade as well as its structure. "That scared us a little," recalled Smith. "In northern Europe we see a lot of Brutalist buildings, and that's not the direction we wanted to go in. We started looking at how we could use the material in a different way." With local concrete contractor LWC, the architects played with pigment, using different colors to signal structure and ornament. In terms of form, they sought a balance between uniqueness and standardization. Heatherwick Studio's 3D modeling specialists came up with a set of 10 curvatures that, distributed across a total of 1,050 facade panels, could be recombined to deliver a unique shape to each classroom—thus streamlining fabrication without introducing obvious repetition. To further camouflage the facade's standardized elements, and to avoid swerving into Brutalist territory, the architects introduced a texture of horizontal bands, spaced, per local code requirements, to be pigeon-proof. In the end, explained Smith, "the panels are all unique because of the system we developed to treat the facade pattern." The system involved applying stripes of glue-like retardant onto the formwork, pouring the concrete, allowing it to set 24 hours, then hosing it down to remove the still-wet material. "We didn't add anything to the facade; we subtracted it," said Smith. To minimize solar gain, Heatherwick Studio introduced narrow bands of glazing around the perimeter of each classroom. Having rejected curved glass as too costly, but wishing to avoid a faceted appearance, the architects arranged the flat panes in a zig-zag pattern. A slight floor-by-floor cantilever further cuts the heat, turning each story into a natural sunshade for those below it. Meanwhile, induction units positioned under the windows passively ventilate the classrooms. Rounded bronze-mesh balconies situated between each classroom wing draw air into and through the courtyard, producing a cross breeze no matter the direction of the wind. The final pin in the Learning Hub's sustainability cap (the building achieved the highest sustainability rating awarded by the government of Singapore) is the hydroponic greenery distributed across the balconies and rooftop garden. For Smith, the ongoing collaboration with concrete fabricator LWC was a crucial element of the Learning Hub's success. The contractor's ingenuity and willingness to work with the architects provided the level of distinction required by the NTU brief. "We spent a lot of time with the consultants working on colors and texture," said Smith. "The concrete has a handmade feel; we're very happy with that. In Europe you pick your facade from a catalogue, but in this situation we were able to design it from scratch."
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Product> Hardware for Doors, Drawers, and More

Whether concealed or out in the open, hinges, handles, and railings enhance both the safety and aesthetics of the well-considered interior. Here's a selective survey of hardware culled from the AN files. GKD Metal Fabrics Futura 3110 This stainless steel metal mesh is ideal for interior and exterior applications, such as balustrades, screens, and space dividers. Woven for flexibility in one direction, the product weighs just less than 2 pounds-per-square-foot and is 0.37 inches thick. Its 65 percent open area makes it ideal for sun shading applications. CARVART Railings Hardware A unique system of concealed fasteners for various applications—from top mounted to countersunk point fittings—is designed to support CARVART’s glass offerings. Rigid and durable stainless steel, bronze, and aluminum elements can be customized with satin or brushed finishes, powder coatings, or oil rubs. Assa Abloy IN120 Wi-Fi Lock Corbin Russwin and SARGENT brands’ wireless electronic lock can interface with existing IT systems and a range of access control systems. Customizable from a kit of parts, the lock includes features to facilitate operation regardless of network status, and privacy and lockdown modes for both cylindrical and mortise lock designs. Sun Valley Bronze Novus Collection Sun Valley Bronze’s Novus Collection of mortise-lock entry sets features a slim, 2-inch faceplate with no visible hub, a square key cover, and the company’s modern Elle lever. Its white bronze construction boasts 93 percent pre-consumer recycled copper, manganese, nickel, and zinc elements for a nickel hue. Dorma Tensor Hinge Tensor features a self closing, double acting hinge that is suitable for a variety of door designs and sizes up to 143 pounds. When doors open to 90 degrees, Tensor’s inlay is engineered to protect the technical core and function as a mechanical stop. Hawa Concepta 25/30/50 A uniquely engineered pivot-slide hardware system facilitates bi-folding glass and wood pocket doors as wide as 9 feet. Guiding tracks produce gaps of 20 mm from floor to door, and 40 mm from door to ceiling. Doors are flush with the wall when closed. An aluminum fascia conceals hinges when open doors are tucked into the cabinet. Omnia 721 Modern Door Pull A solid, brushed stainless steel 20-mm rod (above) is the defining component of Omnia’s 721 Modern Door Pull. Two lengths—15¾ inches and 31½ inches—affix seamlessly to notched supports that attach directly to the door. It can be installed as a single door pull or doubled up back-to-back. Krown Lab Ring Pull Constructed from solid stainless steel with a radial brushed finish, the Ring Pull is suitable for wood and glass doors. Measuring up to 3 ¼-inches in diameter, open and closed variations can be specified in natural brushed metal and black stainless. The open style features an interior rubber lining for user comfort.
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Full Steam Ahead

While the preservation experts at Beyer Blinder Belle are typically busy making old structures look new with new components that look old (like, say, the signage at a certain skyscraper), BBB's designers also from time to time design from whole cloth. Or whole bronze, as is the case for a pair of murals created for a recent lobby renovation to 230Park Avenue, the former Helmsley Building that caps Grand Central. Last Monday, Monday Properties president Anthony Westreich, the building's owner, dedicated the murals along with local pols Scott Stringer and Daniel Garodnick and Landmarks Preservation Commission chair Robert Tierney. Weighing more than a ton, the murals—which were drawn by Chris Ludlow and sculpted by Joan Benefiel under the direction of BBB—hark back to the building's history as the former headquarters for the New York Central Railroad, depicting a train speeding by with the distinctive profile of 230 Park in the background. See more photos from the dedication and shop after the jump.