Posts tagged with "Broadway":

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Meet The Green Line: How Perkins Eastman would remake Broadway through Manhattan into a 40-block linear park

By now, the "Bilbao Effect" is metonymy for a culture-led revitalization of a postindustrial city driven by a single institution housed in a starchitect-designed complex. The wild success of Manhattan's High Line generates regional seismic effects—the Lowline, the QueensWay, and the Lowline: Bronx Edition all cite the high queen of linear parks as their inspiration. Upping the ante, Perkins Eastman unfurls the Green Line, a plan to convert one of New York's busiest streets into a park. The Green Line would overtake Broadway for 40 blocks, from Columbus Circle to Union Square, connecting Columbus Circle, Times Square, Herald Square, Madison Square, and Union Square with pedestrian and cyclists' paths. Except for emergency vehicles, automobiles would be banned from the Green Line. The proposal has precedent in Bloomberg-era "rightsizing" of Broadway. Traffic calming measures closed Times Square to cars, increased the number of pedestrian-only spaces, and installed bike lanes along Broadway, reducing vehicular traffic overall. In conversation with Dezeen, Perkins Eastman principal Jonathan Cohn noted that "green public space is at a premium in the city, and proximity to it is perhaps the best single indicator of value in real estate. [The] Green Line proposes a new green recreational space that is totally integrated with the form of the city." Value, moreover, isn't linked exclusively to price per square foot. Replacing two miles of asphalt with bioswales and permeable paving could help regulate stormwater flow for the city's overburdened stormwater management infrastructure. Right now, rain falling to the west of Broadway discharges, untreated, into the Hudson, while east of Broadway, stormwater gushes straight into the Hudson. What do you think: is the Green Line on Broadway feasible, or totally fantastical?    
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Los Angeles “Dress Rehearsal” removes a lane of Broadway for pedestrians

It may not look like Los Angeles' next great street yet, but Broadway is changing fast. The latest development in the street's ongoing transformation is the city's Broadway Streetscapes Master Plan, which is revamping the historic thoroughfare for pedestrians and urban activity. The project just completed its $1.5 million"Dress Rehearsal." The plan, using temporary materials to preview the permanent installations to come, was begun in February by Melendrez. It has replaced the street's western lane of traffic from 3rd Street to 11th Street with bulb outs of decompressed granite groundscape, tables, chairs, umbrellas (shade!), and planters. LADOT's final version will include permanent paving, trees, new lanterns, and more. It's part of councilman Jose Huizar's Bringing Back Broadway initiative, which is revamping the street through design guidelines, adaptive reuse incentives, signage regulations, infrastructure improvements, and more. Our friends at Curbed LA first reported on the Dress Rehearsal, and they have more pix below.
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Sunday> Explore the transformation of Los Angeles’ Broadway with The Architect’s Newspaper

You may have noticed a few articles in our pages about the development of Los Angeles' long underexploited street, Broadway, which is experiencing a phenomenal resurgence. Now it's time to take a look at the progress made so far. This Sunday, June 29, AN is co-organizing a (second) tour of the thoroughfare with the A+D Museum, guided by AN West Coast Editor Sam Lubell and LA institution Mike the Poet. The event will stop at some of Broadway's greatest architectural treasures—including the Bradbury Building, the Los Angeles and Rialto Theaters, the Wurlitzer Building, and the Herald-Examiner— and it will look at its future, including revamped and widened sidewalks, new towers and businesses, and even a streetcar. Tickets range from $5 to $20 and are available from the A+D Museum.
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A Pictorial Description of Broadway in 1899

Last week, we came across illustrator James Gilliver Hancock's series of playful block elevations titled "All the Buildings in New York." It turns out this impulse to sketch block upon block of New York's architecture has been around for quite some time. In 1899, the Mail & Express newspaper company published a graphic journey down Manhattan's Broadway in a book called A Pictorial description of Broadway now archived at the New York Public Library. The stroll down Broadway 112 years ago reveals just how much New York has evolved over the past century. As the NYPL says, "The result, as you can see here, is a 19th century version of Google's Street View, allowing us to flip through the images block by block, passing parks, churches, novelty stores, furriers, glaziers, and other businesses of the city's past." Two of the most dramatic plates in the series show Times Square, above. Quite a striking difference to the neon canyon we know today. Below, you can see the lush Madison Square, also with significantly fewer high rises, and below that is a stunningly underdeveloped 59th Street showing vacant lots and buildings of only a few floors. Click on the thumbnails below to launch a gallery.
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You Like Him, You Really Like Him

David Rockwell's star turn at the Oscars last year won the designer considerable plaudits, so he's been asked to reprise his role, according to UPI. "We loved the look and feel that David created for the Oscar show last year," one of the producers said. "David is so creative and has such a great big-picture approach to set design," said another. The well-known interiors ace has done considerable amount of work on Broadway as well as the Kodak Theater where the Oscars are taped, so really, it's like a homecoming.