Posts tagged with "Broad Museum":

Placeholder Alt Text

Colorful crosswalk installation lights up paths to the Broad Museum

Venezuelan-born artist Carlos Cruz-Diez has completed work on a new art installation at the Broad Museum in Los Angeles that utilizes blocks of pastel-colored paint to activate the crosswalks connected to the museum. The installation was developed by the Broad with the Cruz-Diez Art Foundation and the artist himself as part of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA (PST), an ambitious multi-venue exploration of Latin American and Latino art currently taking place across the Los Angeles region. The installation, titled Couleur Additive, was installed along the four crosswalks located at the intersection of Grand Avenue and 2nd Street in Downtown Los Angeles. One of the crosswalks connects the Broad to the Disney Concert Hall located on a block north of the museum. Cruz-Diez is a highly-regarded figure in the Kinetic-Optical art genre, an experimental color theory-based form of artistic exploration initially developed in the 1950s. Cruz-Diez, who recently turned 94 years old, developed his approach based on the assumption that the perception of color in the human eye constitutes an autonomous reality that changes based on position, time, and perspective. His works, according to Ed Schad, assistant curator at The Broad, create art “through and around” the side-by-side collision of the installation’s green, orange, yellow, and blue hues. Schad’s team undertook great pains to comply with the City of Los Angeles’s permitting process for the installation, which required that the paint be applied in such a way as to retain the original sidewalk striping in its entirety. As a result, the paint swatches exist independently from the typical white crosswalk striping. The paint itself was applied by student-artists from the nearby Ramon C. Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts, a complex designed by architects Coop Himmelb(l)au. Joanne Heyler, founding director of The Broad said in a press release, “Carlos Cruz-Diez’s practice challenges the traditional relationship between art and the viewer, and between the viewer and the urban environment,”adding, “His new work Couleur Additive activates the public space around The Broad, embracing Grand Avenue and bringing the museum out into the daily life of pedestrians and our visitors, highlighting the ideas of an important Latin American artist whose career has spanned seven decades.” The public art installation will be featured alongside explanatory materials displayed inside the museum and in conjunction with educational workshops put on by Learning Lab, an arm of the Cruz-Diez Art Foundation. The installation is on view through the year and into 2018.
Placeholder Alt Text

A Porous Building Skin for Downtown Los Angeles

The veil functions both as the primary facade and the daylighting system, providing a sense of connection between the gallery spaces and the city.

The Broad Museum will open its doors to the public on Sunday, 5 years after after Diller Scofidio + Renfro won a small invite-only design competition to design a space for Eli Broad’s immense contemporary art collection. All of the public spaces in the museum are created between the building's two enclosure systems, coined the “vault and veil” by DS+R. The veil, a daylight-absorbing concrete exoskeleton balances performance with fashion, while an interior vault protects a nearly 2,000 piece art collection. Visitors move over, under and through the vault, which consumes almost half of the 120,000 sq. ft., 3-story building. The exterior facade assembly consists of a steel frame clad with 2,500 glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) panels which were precast on custom CNC formed molds. Evidence of the GFRC's digital fabrication process can be prominently seen on the main elevation where a large dimple provides a smooth undulation in the facade. Kevin Rice, Project Director for DS+R, explains this formal move was a deliberate reaction against the repetitiveness of the elevation: “We were studying the capabilities of digital fabrication and wanted to move the design of concrete facades beyond the brutalist facades of the 60s and 70s.” To construct the interior portion of the facade panels, seen below, the project team worked with Kreysler & Associates to develop a lightweight alternative to the exterior cladding. Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) panels were fabricated with a finish to match the adjacent GFRC panels.
  • Facade Manufacturer seele GmbH / Willis Construction (GFRC Manuf.)
  • Architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro (Design Architect); Gensler (Executive Architect, Museum)
  • Facade Installer seele GmbH
  • Facade Consultants Dewhurst MacFarlane, Anning Johnson (Vault Plaster and backup)
  • Location Los Angeles, CA
  • Date of Completion September 2015
  • System Glass fiber reinforced concrete cladding, metal & glass curtain wall, and exterior plaster over a post-tensioned concrete structure with steel plate girder roof
  • Products GFRC Cladding; Metal/glass curtain wall; Grace Perm-a-Barrier (Moisture Barrier); Parex OmniCoat (Exterior Plaster); Sarnafil (Built-up roofing); Parex OmniCoat (Interior Plaster); Moonlight Molds (Skylight GFRG)
Galleries on the third floor sit under 328 skylights supported from a 200’ long span structure composed of 6’ deep plate girders. The skylight monitors are designed to encapsulate the structure of the roof, the lighting system (a combination of daylight and LED), the waterproofing and drainage system, and the fire & life safety systems. All of these functions have been coordinated by DS+R to fit seamlessly within the language of the vault. Rice speaks of the benefits to this rigorously designed roof system: “The skylights are designed to maximize the reflected light from the north sky while eliminating all direct sunlight from entering the space. This allows for the tight conservation controls for the art while eliminating the need for electric light for much of the day.” The building’s siting across the street from Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall notably had an influence on the aesthetics of the facade. Elizabeth Diller said she wanted the building to be strikingly different from Gehry's building: "We realized it was just useless to try to compete – there is no comparison to that building," Diller said. "We just had to do something that is mindful and that knows where it is […] Compared to Disney Hall's smooth and shiny exterior, which reflects light, The Broad is porous and absorptive, channeling light into the public spaces and galleries." What results is a wall system which functions both as the primary facade and the daylighting system, providing a sense of connection between the gallery spaces and the city.
Placeholder Alt Text

Q+A> Broad Art Foundation Director talks architecture, opening date for DS+R’s Los Angeles museum

After speculation, delay, and even a blockbuster lawsuit, the $140 million Broad Museum finally announced last week that it will be opening its doors in Fall 2015, about a year behind schedule. Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, the Downtown Los Angeles museum will contain more than 2,000 works of contemporary art—part of the Broad Art Foundation's growing collection—and admission will be free to the public. AN West Editor Sam Lubell talked with Broad Art Foundation Director Joanne Heyler to get the latest on the project. And to get you keyed up for the eventual opening, here are some of the latest construction images. It's getting close! Sam Lubell: So what's left to do at The Broad? Joanne Heyler:  Everything that’s happening in the building is even better than I anticipated from the renderings and plans. The cylindrical glass elevator leading from the lobby to the third floor galleries is in and can operate, and its floor is lit up. To go from the first floor up to the top is really spine-tingling.  The relief portions of the Veil (aka the lattice-like facade), wrapping around the Hope street side of the museum, are in and successful. The porous parts of the Veil, where scaffolding is still wrapped around, are going to become the image for the public. They're still covered, but the scaffolding is coming down from the insides of the Veil. So on the third floor you can now stand in that expansive space and look towards Grand Avenue. Through the glass panels that are at the perimeter of that space you can see the inside surface of the veil exposed and that’s very exciting. The building is very sculptural because of the Vault form (the Vault will contain the museum's collection) creates the heart of the building, and that sculptural form is in place. Because of that it’s getting very close to complete and it’s very exciting. I’ve taken artists in the collection inside and gotten and incredibly enthusiastic response. The (24,000 square foot) plaza is very very close to being partially opened. It’s meant to open in November. The oculus or dimple or fold that’s in the Grand Avenue portion of the Veil is coming together and there's quite a view from inside. Really we’re making enormous strides. Because the building is so sculptural and dramatic it’s a more exciting hardhat tour than the usual. What were the project's biggest holdups?  The fabrication and installation of the Veil took far longer than was anticipated. However we’re at a stage now where we feel confident enough to at least name the season in which we’ll open, so we’re feeling pretty good about the progress that's being made. We had a difficult time. But we’re on track now. Has the lawsuit with Seele (the facade engineer) been settled?  It’s not settled, but I can’t comment on the lawsuit. Is there now a new engineer working on the Veil? No there’s no new engineer. Seele was taking care of that, and still is. Besides the Veil losing its structural capabilities, have there been any major changes since the project started? This building really has and is going to be completed very much the way that architects intended. I’ve seen other buildings go through many more twists and turns than this one has. Since the Veil issue there haven’t been any other major changes. Early on the elevator was added, but that was decided on a very long time ago. The other decision taken was to to expand the first floor public gallery space, but that decision was made early on as well. Do you believe the museum, and its plaza, will finally help enliven Grand Avenue?  I think that it will. Our plaza offers a rare green space for the area. The olive trees that have gone in are 100-year-old trees curated one-by-one by the design team, and I am very proud of how atmospheric the plaza is as a result. It's even better than I expected. I think it will be a very welcoming place for people. When the restaurant goes in there will be much more activity. I think we will play a big role in enlivening this stretch of Grand Avenue. It's not yet full of day-to-day pedestrian activity, but I think those days are numbered. Given what’s happening at Grand Park (For instance Jay Z's Made in America fest drew 35,000 people there) and as it becomes more residential that’s bound to become a factor in every part of downtown. We and the other institutions and Grand Park are increasing the number of reasons to come to Grand Avenue, not just for performances, but to linger and to get a meal. When the Grand Avenue Project moves ahead that will change it even more. The museum will be free of charge?  The museum is fully funded by the Broad Foundation. Eli has always talked about having a populist approach to art museums and to making it possible for people to connect to contemporary art. When we looked at what made sense to us we felt free admission was the way to go so people could take in the collection in one visit or in several. To have that kind of relationship with the museum. That’s what we hope to foster. We’ll also have a robust scope of engagement programming such as artist talks and film screenings. We’ve already had audiences of up to 2,000 for those. That kind of response is very exciting and we hope a signal of things to come. What's the biggest challenge moving ahead?  I don’t really anticipate any more major architectural challenges. We’re too far down the road. Operationally we’re interested in putting together programming and visitor amentities that make as much use of digital technology as possible. We’re looking to see what form that will take in the museum. There will be more information. The emphasis will be on the building and on the exhibitions. How will you be programming the museum?  The inaugural exhibition is very much in place. But the rest is very hard to pin down because we continue to add works week by week. Will the Broad Foundation maintain a presence in Santa Monica, its current home?  The building’s always been intended as the headquarters and home of the Broad Art foundation. That means we’ll be leaving Santa Monica. We’re all thrilled to be located downtown. When we launched this project downtown was buzzing, but it wasn’t what it is today. The whole array of residential units and restaurants and retail starting to percolate in interesting ways downtown—it’s just an incredibly dynamic time to be there. Does Eli have other architectural plans in the works?  We’re pretty pre-occupied with this building. But you never know with Eli.
Placeholder Alt Text

Broad Collection Sues Seele over Problematic Los Angeles Museum Facade

In a recent interview, Diller Scofidio + Renfro Senior Associate Kevin Rice told AN that the "veil" at Los Angeles' Broad Museum—a facade made of hundreds of molded Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete (GFRC) panels, had been delayed by over a year. "Some of the things took longer to make than they thought, but there aren’t really problems with it," Rice said. But now it looks like the issues with the museum's facade are more severe than initially thought. The LA Times has reported that the Broad Collection and contractor Matt Construction are suing Seele, the engineer of that facade, seeking $19.8 million in damages relating to the delay. Other damages, according to the complaint (PDF), include breach of contract, fraud in the inducement, and fraud and deceit. The lawsuit, filed in Los Angeles Superior Court, alleges that Seele "violated the important 'aesthetic aspect' of the architect's design," and its mockups were "unsightly and wholly unacceptable for use on the project." As a result the firm was not able to meet its October, 2013 deadline to design, fabricate, and install the facade, setting the project's timeline way back. The Broad's lawsuit also names Zurich American Insurance Company and Fidelity and Deposit Company—backers of a bond guaranteeing Seele's work—as defendants. "Seele did not possess the necessary skill, experience, resources, commitment or ability to perform the work at The Broad museum," the complaint stated. Broad Foundation spokesperson Karen Denne told AN, "we're not commenting—the lawsuit speaks for itself." As of now the museum is still set to open in 2015, but the exact date remains up in the air.
Placeholder Alt Text

Here’s Rem Koolhaas’ “Floating” Runner-Up Proposal for Los Angeles’ Broad Museum

With Eli Broad hyping his DSR-designed Broad Museum in Downtown Los Angeles, we thought it would be appropriate to share The Broad that never was: OMA's runner up proposal. As featured in this author's book, Never Built Los Angeles, Rem Koolhaas's firm proposed a "floating" box covered in a lacy-patterned metal screen and cantilevered via steel brace frames above Grand Avenue. Lifting the structure would have created much needed civic space in the area, offering a public zone under the museum and complementing two new plazas to the south and the west of the building. Escalators would have travelled diagonally up from street level to the ethereal upper gallery floors, which would have been lit by multiple skylights. There's a lot to like here, and still some questions about the lack of public commentary before the winning scheme was chosen. Check out many more renderings of the scheme below.
Placeholder Alt Text

Gossip: Los Angeles’ Grand Avenue Edition

The Grand, the multi-million-dollar, mixed use project on top of LA’s Bunker Hill, is finally… slowly… moving forward with an Arquitectonica-designed residential tower, which just broke ground. But it appears that Frank Gehry’s days on the project may be numbered. After a recent call with Related, we got no assurances that the starchitect was still part of the project. A report in the Downtown News got similarly uncommitted answers. Just across the street from the Grand we hear that The Broad (what’s with all the THEs?)—Eli Broad’s multi-million-dollar art museum—is getting ready to add an upscale market to its rear, just above the parking lot. If it’s even close to as successful as Chelsea Market in New York, Downtown LA could have yet another hit on its hands. Meanwhile, decking is being laid for a new park to The Broad’s south, but still no renderings of the park have been unveiled. Let’s make this public, Mr. Broad. We can’t wait to see your plans, which could single-handedly make or break Grand Avenue.
Placeholder Alt Text

Construction Heating Up in Downtown Los Angeles: DS+R and Arquitectonica To Hit Benchmarks

Next Tuesday, January 8, The Broad in Downtown Los Angeles (not that Broad Museum), Eli Broad's new contemporary art museum with an arresting net-like "veil" facade by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, will top out at the corner of Grand Avenue and Second Street. The project is set to open next year and will contain 120,000-square-feet over three-levels, including 50,000 square feet of gallery space on two floors, a lecture hall for up to 200 people, a public lobby with display space and a museum shop. As usual, the topping-out ceremony will include a theatrical event: in this case, the "flying of the beam," in which a 294-foot crane lifts the final steel beam to the top of the structure. (In the meantime, take a fly-through of the new building in this video rendering.) In addition to Broad and DS+R, others on hand will be LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa as well as 100 construction workers for the project. You can watch a live construction cam of the project here. AN also learned that Related California will break ground on its new Arquitectonica-designed apartment tower on January 10, just two days after the Broad event. The 19-story building is the first major piece of the long-delayed Grand Avenue project. No more details on the event, but there are sure to be some fancy shovels and some bigwigs on hand. That's some heavy symbolism for the transformation of downtown's long-troubled Grand Avenue. Yes, it's really happening.
Placeholder Alt Text

Watch the Broad Museum Come to Life in Real-Time

While cameras allowing real-time viewing of work on downtown LA’s Broad museum have been in place since construction began last fall, the scenery is finally getting more interesting. The structure’s parking garage is now complete and construction permits were recently approved for the museum itself, according to LA Downtown News. The intricately-clad concrete building, designed by architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro, is on schedule for a late 2013 completion. The three-story structure will include about “50,000 square feet of gallery space on two floors, a lecture hall for up to 200 people, and a public lobby with display space and a museum shop,” as described by the Broad Art Foundation. The budget is $130 million. The Live Construction Cam at the Broad Art Foundation site is accompanied by time-lapse camera capturing high resolution pictures updated every 15 minutes. The site also allows viewers to stream a time-lapse movie documenting progress on the site over time.
Placeholder Alt Text

Quick Clicks> Parks Closing, Shocking Design, Broad-casting, Met Money

Closing Time. Seventy historic state parks across California are slated for closure this year due to budget cuts. The Los Angeles Conservancy has more information on the parks, five of which are in the Los Angeles area, including Los Encinos State Park and the Antelope Valley Indian Museum State Historic Park. Scary Design. The art, literary, and film magazine Zeotrope: All-Story, founded by Francis Ford Coppola, has invited Rodarte fashion designers Kate and Laura Mulleavy to design the Fall 2011 issue. The theme is "Horror," where artists, designers, writers, and other contributors explore the scary, the Gothic, and the sublime. More info at Zeotrope. Broad-casting. Can't get enough Diller Scofidio + Renfro? Now you can watch the construction of DS+R's Broad Museum in Los Angeles 24 hours a day on a live camera feed that allows viewers to track construction progress and view high resolution photography taken every 15 minutes. The museum is expected to be completed in 2013. Via the LA Times. Tourism and The MetThe Met Press Room shared that their summer 2011 exhibition season, including the enormously popular "Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty" show, brought in $90.8 million for New York City. “Using the industry standard for calculating tax revenue impact, the study found that the direct tax benefit to the City and State from out-of-town visitors to the Museum totaled some $90.8 million,” according to the Met. Sixty-eight percent of museum visitors were not from New York City and stayed for an average of five days.
Placeholder Alt Text

Much Ado About Nothing At Grand Avenue

Curbed LA yesterday shared schemes for the zone around Diller Scofidio + Renfro's Broad Museum, revealing renderings of two residential towers to the south and east of the project and space for a new plaza.  The images sent the ever-excitable architecture community chattering. But while it's great to get a better sense of what's going up, as the blog pointed out and the architects have reiterated, the images don't reveal what the design will actually look like. Developed by LA firm Grant Price Architects, the plans were part of a "Concept Study" for LA's Community Redevelopment Agency through developer Related Companies to explore the various configurations on the site. "It’s too early to get an idea of what they could do around the museum,"  Ted Ogami, Associate Director at Grant Price told AN. "It’s going to go through a number of iterations before they decide what to do." So we still need to wait until DS+R and Broad roll out their scheme for the area. DS+R Senior Associate Kevin Rice, the project director, confirmed that the firm is working under the assumption that they will likely design the plaza, but won't start work on it until that's confirmed in the next few months . Curbed did reveal that an architect for one of the towers is likely to be revealed in 30 days. More things to wait for. So be patient.  
Placeholder Alt Text

Video> Fly Through the New Broad Museum

Yesterday, Sam Lubell detailed The Broad Foundation's much-anticipated LA museum complete with all the renderings. Now, we have a video fly-through of the new Diller Scofidio + Renfro-designed space and isn't it something! You can really start to appreciate the porous nature of The Broad's structural concrete "veil" and the views inside and out it will offer. You also gain a sense of its street presence sitting alongside Frank Gehry's Disney Hall, which appears rather large in comparison. What do you think? [ Video courtesy Broad Foundation. ]
Placeholder Alt Text

Thursday is D Day for Broad Museum

Finally. The design for Eli Broad's new contemporary art museum in Downtown LA, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, is being unveiled on Thursday, according to a press release sent out today. The event will take place at 11:00 am at Walt Disney Concert Hall (next to the new museum site), giving us lazy journalists plenty of time to make it. According to the release, the museum will be "home to the worldwide headquarters of The Broad Art Foundation," and will provide a home for Broad's collection of more than 2,000 works by 200 artists. Since the museum saga has dragged out over several years between several cities, and because he's hired one of the country's top architects, Mr. Broad has done an excellent job of building our expectations. Hope it's good!