Posts tagged with "Brad Cloepfil":

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Allied Works to design Pratt Institute’s new fine arts building

Pratt Institute has selected Allied Works to complete a new building to house its Master of Fine Arts and Photography programs on their 25-acre Brooklyn campus, providing the School of Art “a distinct...identity on campus for the first time.” The project will feature flexible classroom, studio, and tech lab space, as well as room for public galleries. The new School of Art is designed to be a “cultural anchor” for Brooklyn and for the broader New York art world. The project intends to “catalyze both the campus and community, [and become] a wellspring of art and creative energy,” according to Allied Works founding partner Brad Cloepfil. Allied Works, which was founded in 1994 and has offices in Portland, Oregon and New York City, has completed a number of other cultural and educational commissions, including the National Music Centre of Canada in Calgary and a creative arts center for Portland’s Catlin Gabel School. While they have completed an array of projects in New York, including the 2008 transformation of the Museum of Arts and Design, this will be the firm’s first foray into Brooklyn.
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Following lawsuit, Clemson University backs down on plans for a new architecture center in Charleston

For the second time in a decade, Clemson University has scrapped plans for a modern architecture center in Charleston’s historic district. Confronted with a lawsuit by neighborhoods and preservation groups, who objected to the addition of the glitzy, $10 million metal-and-glass building on George and Meeting streets, the university is seeking to lease temporary space in downtown Charleston. The approval process for the architecture center has seesawed since 2012, when residents decried the building as aesthetically unfit to rub shoulders with the stately George Street headquarters of Spoleto Festival USA. Arguably, the historic district is already a hodgepodge of stylistic eras—from Georgian to Federal to Greek Revival to Victorian The architecture center's leased location has yet to be determined, but it will house the university’s locally-based architecture and historic preservation programs. Clemson’s Board of Trustees recently approved the plans for a temporary home to “better meet existing needs, anticipate planned growth and ensure that students in Charleston work in labs, studios and workshops that reflect contemporary standards of professional practice, a larger, more functional facility is required,” Clemson said. Currently, the historic preservation master’s degree program, which Clemson administers with the College of Charleston, and the Clemson Architecture Center are spread over three locations. According to the university, the interim leased space will be large enough to accommodate growth from a proposed new master’s degree program and the expansion of the specialized healthcare design track. The initially proposed architecture center (to be named the Spaulding Paolozzi Center) by nationally known architect Brad Cloepfil of Oregon-based Allied Works Architecture garnered some supporters at the 2012 Board of Architectural Review Meeting–including the director of preservation and museums at the Historic Charleston Foundation. But local residents showed the most antipathy during the public comments section of the meeting. Sculptor John Michel, offered perhaps the most outspoken take: “Why in the world do a bunch of Martians want to invade this city and put up a trap that looks like something that Walmart would build?”
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Holly Hotchner Steps Down as Director of MAD

After a 16-year tenure as director of The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), Holly Hotchner stepped down from her position. Under her guidance, MAD has been transformed into a significant cultural institution, attracting more than 400,000 visitors annually. Hotchner’s leadership ends on the occasion of the 5th anniversary of the museum’s new location. Hotchner wrote, in a statement, “that it would be best for the institution I have nurtured and love to build upon all that has been achieved and move forward into the future with new leadership.” Hotchner fashioned a new vision for the American Craft Museum by focusing on the interdisciplinary spirit of craft today. This foresight led to the establishment of the museum’s home in 2008 at 2 Columbus Circle, designed by Brad Cloepfil of Allied Works Architecture. Throughout her term, she expanded the permanent collection to include established methods of craftsmanship as well as works of art and design produced with inventive new materials and practices such as digital media and technology. MAD’s board of trustees will begin a search for a new director in the coming month. Meanwhile, the museum has selected David Gordon, former director of the Milwaukee Art Museum and Secretary of the Royal Academy of Arts in London, to serve as acting director. Gordon will take over the everyday management of the museum.
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QUICK CLICKS> Denver, Dyker, Dijon, and Mad Ave

Still Life. Fast Company previews Brad Cloepfil/Allied Works Architecture's design for a new 28,000 square foot Clyfford Still Museum in Denver, which will hold 2,400 works from the artist's estate. Suzanne LaBarre writes that Still's will stipulated "that his estate be given, in its entirety, to an American city willing to establish a permanent museum dedicated solely to his artwork." Melting Pot. Bloomberg reports that, based on latest Census numbers, New York is back to being the most diverse city in the U.S., beating out L.A. The Italian-American Brooklyn neighborhood of Dyker Heights takes the prize for the biggest shift, with a 31% increase in Asian residents since the last Census. Scan this! In case you missed it, this week MVRDV released renderings for a mustard factory turned call center in Dijon, France, with an intriguing facade composed of QR tags, via Bustler. New Mad Men. Tommy Hilfiger and his real estate partners buy the old Met Life clock tower on Madison Avenue with plans to convert it into a hotel, writes The Wall Street Journal. Meanwhile, in the Meatpacking neighborhood, Hilfiger's weird preppy pop-up cottage stays up through Sunday.    
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The SFMOMA Shortlist: We Can Dream

The upcoming $480 million SFMOMA expansion is a big deal, and the names that have been bruited about are certainly Big Names. But you can also hear the rumblings: Why no local firms? And especially why so few women in the mix? There's reason to hope that the names mentioned so far are still tentative, and that there's a chance that the official shortlist, due in May, can remedy these shortcomings. Ideally, there would have been an open competition to bring in a broad spectrum of talent. (Renzo Piano, after all, won an international competition to design the Centre Georges Pompidou when he was in his thirties.)  But since that's not going to happen, what about inviting some of our local firms to take a shot at it? As the San Francisco editor of AN, here's a few I think could do us proud in tryouts: --Aidlin Darling. This rising firm's elevation of an old warehouse building (355 11th St.  in San Francisco) into a modern sculpture bodes well for what they could do with an actual museum space. --Anne Fougeron. The most prominent female architect in the city,  Fougeron does classic modernism, but with a twist that feels uniquely Californian, like the JFR house in Big Sur.  She likes to use slatting, which would be a refreshing counterpoint to all that brick. --IwamotoScott. They're known for their conceptual, not built works. But installations like "Voussoir Cloud" give rise to fantasies about wandering through galleries like clouds. --Ogrydziak/Prillinger. They have some very strange, interesting buildings, like the Gallery House they designed for an art-collector couple. Imagine the Botta being attacked by salt-crystal deposits. --Brad Cloepfil of Allied Works. Ok, he's based in Portland, but his renewal of 2 Columbus Circle for the Museum of Arts & Design in NYC is delicate and amazing: ribbons of windows run down the wall and along the floor as translucent strips of glass. If you were Neal Benezra, who would you grant an audience to?
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Allied in Ann Arbor

While unlikely to receive the scrutiny or attention of the Museum of Arts and Design in New York, the new addition to the University of Michigan Museum of Art is something of a return to form for Brad Cloepfil and Allied Works. The extension is uncompromisingly modern, tasteful, light-filled, and restrained enough to be a good neighbor to its beaux arts other half. The Detroit News sings the project's praises, and says that the museum now displays ten percent of its collection, up from a mere three percent prior to the expansion. With at least four museums now under his belt, Cloepfil has become a home grown Renzo Piano. The UMMA addition is likely to expand his reputation further. Next up, the Clifford Still Museum in Denver.
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Welcome to the MAD House

The Museum of Art and Design held its reception for architects and designers last Friday, and while the tchotke-lined galleries were packed with fancypants and fancy glasses, AN did not spot too many boldfaces--perhaps everyone was home warming up their popcorn for the debate. We did see Barry Bergdoll, Matilda McQuade, and Karen Stein and even asked a few people what they thought of Brad Cloepfil's resplendent new digs. Raj Patel, a designer at ARUP who worked on the museum, said it was good the team could get together and enjoy the space it worked so hard on. "A lot of people have spent a lot of time and worked a lot on the process of making this happen," Patel said. "Now it's time to celebrate." And his favorite part of the museum? "Obviously, the building is best at day, but the light is just amazing no matter what." Suzanne Stephens, the deputy editor at Record, wasn't so sure. "Everyone's talking about the debate," she said, "but when they aren't, it's the lighting strategy. It's either got to be party lighting or museum lighting. You can't have both." She did agree with Patel on one point, though. "I'll have to decide during the day." Cloepfil spent most of the night holding court near the door. Asked about the economy, which, after the debate and the lighting, seemed to be on everyone's mind, the Portland-based designer took a jab at himself. "Do we need museums that cost $1,200 per square-foot?" he asked, gesturing around the lobby. "I'm not sure we do. I don't think there's any wrong with that, but it's not sustainable for now. We just have to adapt, cut back. Cut the fat. It'll be good, cleansing." Here's to slimmer architecture.
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M.A.D. Dash

By the time we realized there were no water taxis headed uptown and took the A train, instead, the Museum of Arts and Design's opening day press conference was almost over and only a few diehard journo's (Christopher Hawthorne, Robert Campbell) were still lurking around to talk to museum architect Brad Cloepfil of Allied Works Architecture (above in the catbird seat) about winning the four-year fight to turn a playboy's private collection housed in crimson and burled panelling into a high-tech cabinet of craft curiosities. Asked what he thought about the space now that it's chock-ablock with the kind of severe white (though some are black) Fort-Knox-style display cases favored by the downtown design store Moss, the architect said, "They have to learn how to play the instrument." Sliding Signage by Pentagram Cloepfil said this curvey vase by Eva Held has "profoundly influenced" his design approach for the Clyfford Still Museum in Denver, now in design development.