Posts tagged with "boat racing":

Tempting fate? Working replica of the Titanic to set sail in 2018, destination Dubai

The unsinkable can't sink twice, can it? Australian businessman Clive Palmer certainly hopes not. His replica Titanic, called Titanic II, is due to set sail in 2018 with the ship's maiden voyage taking a less treacherous path than her predecessor, sailing from Jiangsu in Eastern China to Dubai. The route through the South China and Arabian Seas and the Indian Ocean are supposedly iceberg free. https://youtu.be/QxDi_No5mNM Palmer originally floated the idea for the project in 2012, with planning beginning immediately, but the scheme has since been subject to delays, pushing the launch date to 106 years after the original Titanic's maiden excursion. Unlike the original, which used some 3 million rivet bolts to join the hull (of which some in the cold conditions broke upon contact with the iceberg), the Titanic II will have a welded hull and be approximately four yards wider. Another disparity that will be welcome news to passengers will be that it will have a 2,700 lifeboat capacity for its 2,435 member crew, unlike the original which controversially carried lifeboat capacity of 1,178 for its 2,223 passengers due to aesthetic reasons. http://titanic-ii.com/sites/default/files/videos/Grand_Staircase_Cam2.webm "The new Titanic will of course have modern evacuation procedures, satellite controls, digital navigation and radar systems and all those things you’d expect on a 21st century ship" said James McDonald, marketing director, Blue Star Lines. Like the original, first, second, and third-class tickets will be available to purchase with segregated dining and living spaces corresponding to the tiered ticketing scheme. The vessel will cost $429 million, have a top speed of 24 knots (one knot more than the original) and be able to accommodate 2,400 passengers, (an increase of 177) and 900 crew.

Glimpse Miami’s Abandoned Marine Stadium and the New Perez Art Museum Miami

Last month AN compiled a list of the most high profile projects taking place in Miami, and on a recent trip to the Magic City, we had the opportunity to visit two of these sites: the shuttered Marine Stadium and Herzog and de Meuron's new building for the Perez Art Museum Miami (PAMM). While new developments flood Miami, preservationists are fighting to save and revive the abandoned Marine Stadium on Virginia Key by Cuban-born architect Hilario Candela. In 2009, the graffiti-covered venue that once held powerboat racing events and large-scale concerts, was placed on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s list of “11 Most Endangered Historic Places.” Now that the advocacy group, Friends of Miami Marine Stadium, has won the approval from Miami City Commission for its Virginia Key Master Plan, including the restoration of the 6,566-seat stadium, the next step is winning the approval for the site plan and raising $20 million. When the Miami Art Museum started to outgrow its cramped quarters in Philip Johnson's Miami-Dade Cultural Center, museum officials and board members selected Herzog and de Meuron to design a new building (now dubbed the Perez Art Museum Miami) right on Museum Park overlooking Biscayne Bay, what Jorge Perez, real estate developer and the benefactor of the museum, has said is the "last big piece of public land downtown." "The board wanted a building that was first functional, and not just a piece of sculpture," said Thom Collins, Director of PAMM. The concrete and glass structure is a nod to Stiltsville, a vernacular form of architecture originally built on the bay in the 1930s, and will house a variety of exhibition spaces to accommodate works of different scale. "Our project was principally driven by the recognition of the fact that Miami is becoming a home for contemporary art," said Collins. "Our building now has no room for storage or conservation, or education."