Posts tagged with "Beijing":

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Studio Roosegaarde’s giant air-purifier leaves Beijing’s air cleaner than it found it

During his visit to Beijing in 2013, Daan Roosegaarde, Dutch artist, designer, and innovator, discovered the air quality in the city was so poor that children were kept indoors and he was unable to see out the window of his hotel room. But Roosegaarde saw more in the smog than most; he saw the possibility for clean air for the people of Beijing. He returned to his team of designers at Studio Roosegaarde and they set to work on designing, building, and testing (what they claim is) the world’s largest air purifier. Standing at almost 23 feet high, the Smog Free Tower can clean 30,000 cubic meters of air per hour using the same amount of electricity as a home water boiler (about 1,400 watts). According to Roosegaarde, the system can collect, capture, and turn to dust about 75% of dangerous PM2.5 and PM10 airborne smog particulates, creating a bubble of clean air in its midst. Studio Roosegaarde turned to Kickstarter to get the project going and were able to build their first Smog Free Tower in Rotterdam in September of 2015. One year later, with the support of the Chinese Ministry of Environmental Protection, the Smog Free Tower opened in Beijing’s 751 D.Park on the first stop of its global tour. “We warmly welcome Smog Free Project to Beijing,” said Liu Guozheng, Secretary-General of The China Forum of Environmental Journalists. “This project is key in our agenda to promote clean air as a ‘green lifestyle’ among Chinese citizens. Our goal is to guide the public to a healthier lifestyle, low carbon development and to raise awareness amongst the public and reduce smog.” Visitors have also enjoyed visiting the Tower during its stay, calling it the “clean air temple,” in reference to historic Chinese pagodas. During its stint in Beijing, the tower cleansed 30 million cubic meters of air, equivalent to the volume of 10 Beijing National Stadiums, and removed 400 grams of smog. The smog particulates collected from the tower’s Beijing stay have been used to create 300 limited edition Smog Free Rings, each crafted by a member of Roosegaarde’s design team. The purchase of the rings aids in the development of the project and its global tour. “Smog Free Project is about the dream of clean air and the beginning of a journey towards smarter cities,” said Roosegaarde. He and his team hope that the Smog Free Project will inspire citizens, governments, and other members of the tech industry to work together toward smog-free cities. To learn more about Smog Free Project, Smog Free Rings, and the Smog Free Tower’s next stop on its global tour, visit Studio Roosegaarde’s website here.
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MAD Architects reveal designs for China Philharmonic Hall in Beijing

Beijing-based MAD Architects has revealed plans for the design its latest project, the China Philharmonic Hall. The 286,000-square foot music hall is located on a 2.86-acre property in Beijing’s Central Business District and has been designed in collaboration with acoustics expert Yasuhisa Toyota in an effort to create a state-of-the-art music venue for China’s capital city. Toyota was also an acoustics designer for the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, the Philharmonie de Paris, and the Suntory Hall in Japan, and is known as a master in the field. The concert hall, surrounded on two sides by vegetation and a lotus pond, is designed to be approached through park areas and act as an urban refuge. In a press release from the firm, Ma Yansong, founder and principal at MAD Architects, describes the project as a place of respite in what is otherwise a hub of trade and commerce, saying, “We wanted to create a pure and sacred oasis in the midst of the bustling city.” He added, “From the moment you enter the building, you will be taken to another time and space.” Like many of MAD Architects’ recent projects, the building’s functional interior spaces—a 1,600-seat concert hall, a smaller 400-seat rehearsal hall, recording studio, library, gallery, offices, and rehearsal rooms—are all amassed together at the center of an otherwise airy and porous building. Flowing around the central building mass is a sinuous exterior facade made of translucent white panels that contain circulation and gathering spaces. The venue’s main concert hall is designed with a terraced seating arrangement made up of wooden platforms and is capped by a series of billowing white forms that are, according to the architects, inspired by the petals of the lotus flower. These surfaces will be used for projections during performances—all part of the effort to have a transformative effect on the venue's harried urban occupants. The project is scheduled to begin construction this year and is expected to be completed in 2019.
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MAD Architects transforms a house into a playful, airy kindergarten

Beijing-based MAD Architects has completed work on the new Clover House kindergarten, the firm’s first project in Japan. The project deconstructs an existing catalog home, peeling away everything except its structure in order to expand the building’s footprint. Located in the Aichi Prefecture of central Japan, the school is operated by a pair of brothers who wanted to establish a facility that could be as comfortable as a home. MAD Architects principal Ma Yansong cites this impetus as the project's driving force, explaining in a press release, “It was important to create a kindergarten that felt like a home, and give the kids the best possible house to grow up in, one that promotes their learning and creativity.” The new bulbous, faceted structure billows around the preserved structural frame, which is now an informal space divider. One corner of the new house swoops down as it meets a new catenary-arched entrance while a second-floor slide descends onto an expansive playground. The interior spaces of the school weave through and climb over the remains of the existing home, with staircases bringing classrooms and play spaces onto what would have been the roof of the existing building. As with MAD Architects’ recent Xinhee Design Center in Beijing, China, the designers were inspired by the analogous relationship between bones and flesh that the existing beams and new covering reproduce: The roughly-hewn beams of the existing house play against the smooth blonde wood and gypsum articulation of the new interior spaces. The new skin, soft with plaster, is punched through by geometrically-shaped windows flood that flood the interior with light. Outside, the monolithic exterior is clad in white vernacular asphalt shingles.
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MAD Architects reveals plans for Xinhee Design Center in Beijing

Beijing-based MAD Architects have revealed designs for a roughly 657,000 square foot (61,000 square meter) headquarters for Chinese clothing designer and manufacturer Xinhee Group. In their designs for the massive headquarters, the architects utilized the fashion group’s multi-brand corporate structure as a guiding principle, designing a six-lobed complex of buildings joined at a central atrium. Each lobe of the radially-organized plan houses one of the company’s six clothing brands, creating a unified whole from discrete working parts. In a meeting with AN last month, MAD Founding Principal Ma Yansong relayed the inspiration behind the center as a blend between pragmatism and nature, with many of the aspects of the building pulling double-duty socially and environmentally. For example, the central atrium—which connects the various arms and employees of the company—allows the group to host grand fashion shows while simultaneously acting as a massive solar chimney for the building. It pulls cool air from ground-level gardens up through the structure, carrying away heat and exhaust along the way. The structure’s sinuous floor plates seemingly dance around central cores contained within each of the six building sections. These floor plates vary in size and proportion across the complex, with some of the upper floors pulled back from the sloped facade, creating internal double- and triple-height spaces. The resulting array of stacked levels is clad in large sections of PTFE curtain wall panels that introduce dappled light. In the process, the PTFE makes the building appear lighter than it actually is. Yansong elaborated in a press release for the project, stating “It’s interesting for a building with such an intrinsically logical structure to look floating and free.” Though renderings for the project have just been released, the Xinhee Design Center is currently under construction and is expected to be operational sometime in 2017.
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SOM completes trapezoid-clad tower in Beijing

The Chicago office of SOM recently completed a 55-story tower—called the Beijing Greenland Center—in the Dawangjing business district of Beijing. The mixed-use project is clad in a trapezoidal facade that's meant to catch and reflect daylight in the often overcast city. The Beijing Greenland Center is comprised of Class A office space and 178 apartments on top of a multi-story retail podium. SOM was also responsible for the masterplanning of the Dawangjing business district. The mixed-use development is located between Beijing's historic core and the Beijing Capital International Airport, northeast of the city. Along with the Beijing Greenland Center, SOM has also designed several other towers for the district. The tower’s trapezoidal skin is part of building’s sustainability systems. The undulating trapezoids provide self-shading on all sides of the building. Other sustainable systems include a Direct Digital Control building automation system, a heat reclaim wheel, and water-side economizer to utilize evaporative cooling. These systems account for an estimated 30% reduction in energy use and water consumption compared to baseline.
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Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Bronze The Waldorf Astoria Beijing

Bronze facade is inspired by Chinese historic architecture.

In designing the facade of the new Waldorf Astoria Beijing, Chicago-based Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture (AS+GG) set out to create a contemporary expression that maintained a relationship to the city’s historic context. The project, after all, is within walking distance of the Forbidden City and many of the Chinese capitol’s famous Hutongs. “How do we make the experience of going to a hotel special and what about it would be Chinese?” enquired founding partner Gordon Gill. “From an experience standpoint, what about the wall could change your experience in your room?” The answer was a bronze facade with a bay window system that protrudes out from the face of the building.
  • Facade Manufacturer Yuanda Exterior Wall Manufacturer
  • Architects Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture
  • Facade Installer Yuanda Exterior Wall Manufacturer
  • Facade Consultant Lerch Bates
  • Location Beijing, China
  • Date of Completion 2014
  • System bronze panels with modular bay windows and solar shading
  • Products bronze, low-iron glass
The bay windows are not uniform, however, but tuned to differing angles and orientations to frame particular views. This makes the whole building “like a compound eye,” according to Gill. Working in co-ordination with Toronto-based Yabu Pushelberg, the interior architects, the team developed a modular system based on the size of the rooms and the dimensions of the structural bays. It led to a cleaner design that was easier to construct. While the texture created by the bay window system is ornamental and connected to the context, it also provides solar shading. Shade provided by horizontal glass fins above the recessed vertical windows allowed the architects to use very clear low-iron glass to give the best views possible. “It is not tainted by a tint or a color in any way. There is a low-e coating on the glass, but it’s a low-level so it’s not reflective on the inside,” said Gill. The architects developed the bronze details, and the client initially liked it. The designers were excited, but nervous about it actually happening. Gill explained, “We went back to the chairman a few weeks later for the presentation, and he came back and said ‘Well I want you to know that I had lunch with the mayor and I told him that this building was going to be bronze, and he loved it, so now we have to do it.’ So it was just a matter of detailing out.” Metal panels can present technical challenges, especially catalytic failure between the z-clips and the metal panels, including rusting, corrosion, or telegraphing through the panel. The design team mitigated these problems, so the main challenge was to get the color right. Bronze is not a typical material, so they had to rely on their own blend of copper, nickel, and brass to achieve a warm, golden color that was not too yellow, red, or brown, but somewhere in between. There is variation from panel to panel—an unpredictability that adds to the texture and richness of the facade. The unusual material was inspired by two large bronze pots at a nearby historic hospital building, which the client had referenced. This decision exemplifies the ethos of the building, which was to capture the elegance and quality of Waldorf Astoria’s brand in contemporary yet contextually sensitive building. It has come to serve as an example to luxury hoteliers around the world.    
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Misplaced monuments: Designers take to Photoshop to transplant world landmarks in new locations

When it comes to a famous landmark, to what extent does locale add to its majesty? An inventive design competition posted to Australian virtual design studio DesignCrowd explored this question with a challenge to designers to reposition the world’s most hyped monuments in all-new locations using high-resolution images. Designers were tasked with making the extrication of the Big Ben look believable, inserting in its place the Sydney Opera House, the Eiffel Tower, or the Great Wall of China. The first-place accolade went to a Photoshop-aholic who had supplanted Moscow’s St. Basil’s Cathedral in place of the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt. Snagging second place was a seamless overlay of the Roman Colosseum where the Sydney Opera House had once stood. Meanwhile, another designer made the Sydney Opera House seem a natural addition to the Thames riverfront overlooked by the London Eye. Another creative effort saw the Hollywood sign superimposed on the hills along which the Great Wall of China undulates. The design brief, posted to the crowdsourced graphic design bidding site, received 92 designs from 25 designers.
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Zaha Hadid unveils plans to build the largest airport terminal on the planet—in China

Fresh off settling a legal dispute with New York Review of Books critic Martin Filler, Zaha Hadid has unveiled plans for her latest project. And even for the Queen of Swoop, this one is big. Very Big. Record-breaking big. Working with ADP Ingeniérie, a French firm that specializes in airport design, Hadid has drawn up plans for the largest airport passenger terminal on earth. The superlative terminal will, of course, be in China. Specifically, at the new Daxing Airport near Beijing. Conceptual designs for the roughly 7.5-million-square-foot space have all the trademark design flourishes of Hadid's work—an undulating roof, swooping columns, and a grand, polished interior. Gizmag noted that from above the terminal appears as a "massive mutant starfish." Not wrong. "Initially accommodating 45 million passengers per year, the new terminal will be adaptable and sustainable, operating in many different configurations dependent on varying aircraft and passenger traffic throughout each day," said Zaha Hadid Architects in a statement. The firm added that the terminal will serve as a multi-modal transit hub with connections to local and national rail lines. "Under the leadership of the Beijing New Airport Headquarters (BNAH) and the Local Design Institute, the joint design team consists of ADPI and ZHA, along with competition consortium group members Buro Happold, Mott MacDonald and EC Harris," reported ArchDaily. The project is slated to be completed as soon as 2017.
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How the "Climate Penalty" will make air pollution in cities even worse

Scientists' dire warnings about climate change have become as routine as they are shocking. As global temperatures shatter records and extreme weather events rip across the planet, climatologists have continued to issue study after study about how bad things are and how much worse they will get. For years, we've known that coastal cities are threatened by rising sea levels, but now there is even more bad news for those living in populated urban centers—whether they're near the sea or not. It's called the "climate penalty" and it could transform urban living. According to the New York Times, scientists are warning that a warmer planet will  mean smoggier cities. “Ozone is a key culprit,” explained the Times. “This lung-damaging compound, often formed from chemical reactions involving sunlight and automobile exhaust and other pollution, plagues major cities around the globe. As the climate heats up, it is projected that more ozone will form in polluted areas on sweltering days.” While the climate penalty could have serious health impacts for city dwellers, sparsely populated places of the globe could actually see a slight improvement in air quality; that’s because higher temperatures increases the amount of water vapor in the air, which can separate ozone particles. News of the "climate penalty" comes shortly after a report found that Beijing will be covered in smog for the next 16 years.
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Scientists say Beijing will be covered in a cloud of air pollution for 16 more years

The air in Beijing, China is dirty, and a new report suggests it won't be getting cleaner any time soon. Beijing residents received the grim news from the Beijing Municipal Research Institute of Environmental Protection regarding the city's air pollution levels. Following studies done by the institute, researcher Pan Tao has estimated the return of safe air pollution levels in 2030. The World Health Organization has stated in the past that the concentration of PM2.5, particulate matter with a diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less per cubic meter, should not exceed 35 micrograms per cubic meter. In 2013, however, the level of PM2.5 in Beijing measured 89.5 micrograms per meter.
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On View> Connecticut's Bruce Museum presents "Tales of Two Cities: New York & Beijing"

Tales of Two Cities: New York & Beijing Bruce Museum 1 Museum Drive, Greenwich, CT Through August 31 The Bruce Museum’s newest exhibition examines two of the world’s greatest art capitals: New York and Beijing. The show compares works by five New York–based artists and five Beijing-based based artists. The ten creators have been engaged in five different global, cross-cultural, artistic dialogues over the course of two years via email, Skype, and in person, sometimes with translators, about issues ranging from political and social upheaval, the concept of global culture, and questions about materials and techniques. The exhibition consists of new and existing works along with two site-specific pieces. The concept for this show grew out of a 2010 collaboration between New York artist Michelle Fornabai and Beijing artist Qin Feng, which was curated by Pan Qing at Columbia University’s Studio X. Both artists are featured in the Bruce Museum show. The curators matched the artists based partly on the kind of work that they do and their artistic processes, but more importantly on the type of dialogue in which they suspected the artists might engage within the context of their respective urban environments. Many of the ten artists are themselves on the move between global art centers, not only New York and Beijing, but also in Latin America and Europe.
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Such Great Heights: CTBUH names world's best tall buildings

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, the nonprofit arbiter on tall building design, has named its 2014 picks for best tall buildings. Among the winners are a twisting tower in Dubai, Portland's greenest retrofit, and a veritable jungle of a high-rise. The four regional winners are: The Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building, Portland, USA (Americas); One Central Park, Sydney, Australia (Asia & Australia); De Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands (Europe); and Cayan Tower, Dubai, UAE (Middle East & Africa). Portland’s Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building is not a new building. Designed by SOM in 1974, the office tower used a pre-cast concrete façade that had begun to fail by the turn of the 21st century. Bainbridge Island, Washington-based Cutler Anderson Architects and local firm SERA modernized the 18-story, 512,474 square-foot structure that is now targeting LEED Platinum. One Central Park in Sydney uses hydroponics and heliostats to cultivate gardens and green walls throughout the tower, cooling the building and creating the world's tallest vertical garden. OMA’s De Rotterdam is the largest building in the Netherlands, and its form playfully morphs the glassy midcentury office high-rise in a way that’s part homage and part experimental deconstruction. In the Middle East, Dubai’s twisting Cayan Tower (formerly The Infinity Tower) is a 75-story luxury apartment building that turns 90 degrees over its 997-foot ascent. Remarked the CTBUH panel: “happening upon its dancing form in the skyline is like encountering a hula-hooper on a train full of gray flannel suits.” CTBUH will pick an overall “Best Tall Building Worldwide” winner at their 13th Annual Awards on November 6, at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. Their panel of judges includes Jeanne Gang, OMA’s David Gianotten, Laing O’Rourke’s David Scott, and Sir Terry Farrell, among others. OMA’s CCTV Tower in Beijing won last year’s competition. Most of the 88 contest entries were from Asia, CTBUH said, continuing that continent’s dominance of global supertall building construction. CTBUH's international conference will take place in Shanghai in September. You can find more about the 2014 CTBUH awards, including a full list of finalists, at their website.