Posts tagged with "Bay Bridge":

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BridgeHOUSE Reusing Steel From Old Bay Bridge

Since the east span of the Bay Bridge opened in the fall of 2013, demolition crews have been busy deconstructing the old–taking down over 50,000 tons of steel. While most of the steel will be sent to China as scrap, one Bay Area entrepreneur, David Grieshaber, wants to save a portion to create a mixed-use building, housing a museum, a private apartment, and an Airbnb rental. The Airbnb fees would, hypothetically, keep the non-profit undertaking running. The frame of the project would incorporate the original steel beams (about 1.3 percent of the total bridge) and the floors would use the pavement (and even keep the lane markers). The design would also feature green systems such as rainwater collection, solar panels, and a green roof. The final location for the house has yet been determined. More info on the Bay Bridge House, here.
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Tonight> Watch Leo Villareal's "Bay Lights" in San Francisco (or Online!)

Lighting artist Leo Villareal has been busy lately, opening installations in the New York City subway system and in Madison Square Park, but an even bigger achievement is set to debut tonight in San Francisco. Villareal has attached 25,000 LED lights to the San Francisco Bay Bridge and connected them to a computer in order to create dazzling lighting displays viewable from the city and the water along the suspension bridge. Called The Bay Lights, the project celebrates the bridge's 75th anniversary and is set to go live tonight at 8:30 PST. But don't worry, if you're not in San Francisco to view the installation from the Embarcadero or Telegraph Hill, the event will be streamed live online at the project's website here. Until then, check out a couple videos below of the installation being tested. The Bay Lights is believed to be the largest of its type in the world and will be in San Francisco for two years, lit each night from dusk till 2:00a.m. [h/t to WNYC and Inhabitat for the videos.]
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Buckyball Lights Up Again in Madison Square Park

New York-based artist Leo Villareal is creatively illuminating the constructed form. In Madison Square Park, Villareal's LED light-up geodesic dome, Buckyball, stands tall, undamaged but unlit after Hurricane Sandy. The Madison Square Park Conservancy told AN that the lights are expected to be back on tonight. And soon, Villareal also plans to light-up a far larger construction on the West coast: the San Francisco Bay Bridge. The 30-foot tall Buckyball consists of two nested spheres created by a series of adjoining pentagons and hexagons resting atop a large platform. Each sphere is built using LED tube lights over a metal frame. Random mathematical sequencing allows the tubes to change color and create over 16 million different shades across the geometric sculpture. The spheres will be on view in Madison Square Park through February 1, 2013 and is typically lit up from dusk till dawn. The sculpture was powered down during the recent storms. Meanwhile, Villareal is also working on his next project titled The Bay Lights. This light installation will cover the San Francisco Bay Bridge, creating light patterns visible to residents on either side.  Meant to celebrate the bridge's anticipated 2013 East Span completion, 25,000 white LED lights will be placed along its 1.8 mile span and climb up the 500-foot high steel cables. Shifting light patterns will be displayed from dusk until midnight for two years, visible from afar but hidden from crossing drivers.  The grand lighting scheme is planned to open in early 2013.

San Francisco's Bay Bridge Set to Sparkle with Massive Lighting Display

Video rendering of the Bay Lights (courtesy TBL)  “What if the West Span [of San Francisco’s Bay Bridge] wasn't a bridge and instead were a canvas?” asked Ben Davis, founder of creative agency Words Pictures Ideas and man behind the The Bay Lights (TBL) some time ago. That question soon became the foundation for San Francisco’s latest high-tech public art project that’s got even Silicon Valley abuzz. With the support of San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and major Silicon Valley bigwigs, TBL is planning to put up an ethereal light show 1.5 miles wide and 230 feet high covering the west span of San Francisco’s Bay Bridge. “The Bay Bridge slipped into her sexy sister's shadow and silently slogged for nearly 75 years. With her diamond anniversary upon us, I wanted to give the gray lady a moment to sparkle again,” said Davis. Developed by American artist Leo Villareal, the installation, targeted to start at the end of this year, definitely won't lack sparkle. The project comprises 25,000 individually programmable LED lights set to produce abstract patterns inspired by the bridge's surroundings. When finished, the two-year light show will be seven times the scale of the Eiffel Tower’s 100th anniversary lighting display. Not to worry though, motorists, no need for sunglasses while driving at night; Davis said the LEDs will be set one foot apart and “placed on the outside of the two-and-a-quarter inch vertical suspension cables, facing away from drivers,” effectively making them invisible to the bridge’s commuters. But before the Golden Gate gets its silvery sister, TBL needs to raise $1.8 million by July 1. The project has already raised $5.2 million in gifts and pledges thanks in part to a Tech Challenge it launched last May. High-tech investors include angel investor Ron Conway, tech investor Adam Gross, and Wordpress Founder Matt Mullenweg. If you want to add to the pot, support the project on Causes.
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"Architecture of Consequence" Opens in San Francisco

Last night, the AIA SF launched a new exhibition, Architecture of Consequence: San Francisco, kicking off a whole slew of events in its annual Architecture in the City Festival, the country's biggest such celebration of the built environment. The exhibit explores important social needs that architects can address and features the work of four San Francisco firms—Iwamoto Scott Architecture, Fletcher Studio, SOM, and Envelope A+D—side-by-side with four Dutch firms—Van Bergen Kolpa Architecten, 2012 Architecten, ZUS (Zones Humaines Sensibles), and OMA. Originally conceived by the Netherlands Architecture Institute in 2009, this spin-off of the internationally touring exhibit shows that similar preoccupations are on the minds of architects everywhere—whether it's renewable energy, adaptive reuse, local food production, or thoughtful urban infill. David Fletcher gave the whole exhibit a major boost of local flava with Beta-Bridge (above), "a radical reinvention and reuse of the soon-to-be-demolished eastern span of the existing Bay Bridge." He proposed to load the upper deck of the bridge with medical cannabis greenhouses and the lower deck with a data farm; the water used to irrigate the cannabis plants would circulate down and cool off the chugging servers. On the other end of the scale, OMA revisualized the world in terms of energy. In lieu of standard geopolitical boundaries, it divided the European continent into areas such as Biomassburg, Carbon Capture and Storage Republic (CCSR), and Solaria. The exhibition continues through October 21, and each of the San Francisco firms has been paired up with a Dutch firm to give a discussion about their shared interest over the course of the month (see schedule of talks). The Architecture and the City Festival runs through the end of the month, with in-depth tours of new projects such as Bar Agricole (September 10), the ever-popular Home Tours (September 17-18), and a unique opportunity to experience what it's like to navigate the city without sight ("Acoustic Wayfinding for the Blind," (September 20) led by architect Chris Downey, who talked about losing his sight in a 2010 issue of AN). Check out the full calendar of events.
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Journey to the Center of the Bay Bridge

Action-movie directors: Consider shooting your next film in the innards of one of the biggest projects going up in the Bay Area: the new, $6 billion eastern span of the Bay Bridge.  There's the evident glamour of a self-anchored suspension bridge--the Calatrava-esque part with the tower and cables holding everything up, which is still yet to be built. But already in place is the 1.2-mile  "skyway" portion, and inside the concrete monolith are whole rooms, including an electrical substation, and a tunnel that runs the length of the skyway.  Only maintenance crews are typically allowed in this secret warren, but a media tour led by a Caltrans representative provided a close-up of some of its more unusual features. A portion of the existing Bay Bridge collapsed in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. In anticipation of the next major earthquake, the new bridge has five expansion joints with shock absorbers, cushioning the impact. Hinge beams, which are enormous steel dowels inserted into the joints, allow compression of the bridge sections but counter shear forces. Even before the formal EIR process, the design team was mindful of the wildlife that would be affected. The amount of force that is necessary to drive piles 300 feet deep into the Bay mud and create the footings for the bridge is also enough to kill fish, so the team developed a "bubble curtain" system to diffuse the impact.  Another feature is a nod to the local bird population. The smooth concrete of the new bridge doesn't provide the roosting platform of the current bridge's Erector-set trusses, so the new bridge offers special "cormorant condos." So while the hard-won, pricey suspension span will be a thing of elegance, the other part ain't no slouch either.
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Bay Bridge Babylon

Launching last Tuesday, Dave Eggers' one-time-only Panorama newspaper celebrated the good old days of  investigative journalism with a muckraking piece on the Bay Bridge. Its "above-the-fold" piece, "Unparalleled Bridge, Unparalleled Cost" (which, unlike the rest of the issue, is available online), is a massive 22,000-word exploration into the bureaucratic issues that have caused the new Bay Bridge to be delayed for years and go from an original estimate of $1.8 billion to a final cost around $12 billion. The scandal promised turns out to be a bit less dramatic: much of the price increase will come from paying the interest off the expected $6.3 billion price tag, which is something that Californians expect after all the bond initiatives we've been through. There's a forest of procedural details, which makes it hard to spot the trees, but one point that does come across is that architectural ambitions to best the Golden Gate Bridge with a "self-anchored suspension bridge" for the eastern span was partly responsible for the holdup. What you don't get from this particular article is a sense of what is so great about this design: if it will truly be architecturally spectacular, or more of an engineering feat of strength--a case of bridge boasting rights.