Posts tagged with "Bates Masi + Architects":

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2017 Best of Design Awards for Mixed Use

2017 Best of Design Awards for Mixed Use: North Main Architect: Bates Masi + Architects Location: East Hampton, New York This owner-occupied architecture office and law firm is built for longevity, enhancing the property’s value with durable materials, flexible infrastructure, and adaptable spatial organization. In accordance with vernacular building traditions, simple forms and naturally weather-resistant materials are employed. Copper shingles will last through the next century, showing the effects of weathering without succumbing to them. Similarly, the cedar-plank siding will endure despite patination, bolstered by an innovative fastening method of custom stainless steel clips. These clips grip the edges of each board instead of penetrating it with fasteners, the typical first point of failure. The interior walls follow the same system, and the boards can be easily removed and replaced, providing access to the skeleton of the house. “There's wonderful layers of temporality in this project, from the anticipated patination and wear of materials to certain details—like clips and hooks—that ensure the flexibility of the spaces.” —Irene Sunwoo, director of exhibitions, GSAPP (juror) Structural, Civil Engineer: S. L. Maresca & Associates Consulting Engineers Metalwork: Cedar Design Woodwork: Peragine Millwork Windows and Doors: Arcadia Roof planters: Green Roof Outfitters   Honorable Mention Project: Brickell City Centre Architect: Arquitectonica Location: Miami Brickell City Centre presents an outdoor retail environment without boundaries. The multiblock mixed-use development totals 5 million square feet, with a three-level mall, a hotel, two residential towers, and two office towers. The project focuses on connectivity and sustainable design best exemplified by the Climate Ribbon™—an elevated trellis that recycles energy and shelters visitors.
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Product>Architects and designers share the surfaces they spec the most

Find out why these surfaces are architects' and designers' go-tos for the ceilings, the floors, and everything in-between.

Rosalyne Shieh Partner, Schaum/Shieh

We used Lilac Marble in a recent Brooklyn renovation. It is white with an intense inky black vein. We got the cement encaustic tiles from Mosaic House, but there are also other very good selections from Clé Tile and Granada Tile. For the kitchen, we mixed and matched within a range of colors based on a terra-cotta palette, but you can have custom tiles made from your own design. We used a more traditional Escher-pattern tile of the same type in the bathroom. ­

Paul Masi Principal, Bates Masi + Architects

We work with a range of products based on the project and client needs, but we like Corian for interior surfaces because it is adaptable, durable, and easy to clean. Corian can also be easily repaired and is stain-resistant, which is why we chose it for the integrated sink and countertop in the pantry as well as the walls, floors, and cabinetry in the restrooms of our newly completed office in East Hampton, New York.

Greg Mottola Principal, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

We often use ApplePly from States Industries for casework, paneling, and custom furniture. I love that the material is humble, yet can be finished in a way that elevates it to a level of refinement, all the while revealing the nature of how it is made. The workstations and much of the furniture in our studio are made from ApplePly, and we did a great collection of furniture for the Ballard Library in Seattle. We also recently completed the first of many cafes for Blue Bottle Coffee here in San Francisco, and the millwork and display shelving makes extensive use of the material.

Benjamin Cadena Founder, Studio Cadena

I would have to say white paint—either a bright white like Benjamin Moore’s Super White or a slightly warmer toned white like Benjamin Moore’s Dove White. For me, white helps tie the room together while diffusing light into darker corners of a space. It also focuses attention into what occupies the room rather than the walls themselves—it makes other colors and materials really come alive.

Peggy Gubelmann Design Director, Pembrooke & Ives

We love to use Bendheim specialty glass in our kitchens. This material is durable and adds depth, texture, and glamour to our modern kitchens. We backlight all of our cabinets to highlight the gold mesh sandwiched between the glass and provide a nice glow and ambiance.

Kelly Wearstler Founder and CEO, Kelly Wearstler

I love using marble for walls, kitchen and bathroom surfaces, and furniture. Texture enhances any surface and utilizing natural stone with a marbling pattern creates dimension and depth, adding a layer of richness to a space. Ann Sacks is a favorite for marble tiles; ABC Stone in New York and Marble Unlimited in California are my go-to sources for marble slabs.

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2016 Best of Design Award for Residential > Single Unit: Underhill by Bates Masi + Architects

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it’s grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you. 2016 Best of Design Award for Residential > Single Unit: Underhill Architect: Bates Masi + Architects Location: Matinecock, NY

When the clients chose to leave New York City for the suburbs, they wanted their new lifestyle to retain a strong sense of community. Inspired by the tenants of simplicity, humility, and inner focus espoused by the Quaker history of the surrounding community, the house is characterized by a series of modest gabled structures, each of which turn inward toward a central courtyard. The surrounding plantings, metal ceilings, oak floors, and ceiling boards radiate outward from each central courtyard to further emphasize this geometry.

Contractor Qualico Contracting Corporation

Landscape Architect TL Studio Landscape Architecture Wine Storage, Refrigerator, and Freezer Sub-Zero Gas Range Wolf Kitchen Sink Franke

Honorable Mention, Residential > Single Unit: Wythe Corner House

Architect: Young Projects Location: Brooklyn, NY

Behind the perforated and corrugated zinc of its exterior, this renovation of a 1900s Williamsburg townhouse radically remakes the interior to create a double-height living room and a hovering addition that allows for parking underneath.

Honorable Mention, Residential > Single Unit: Fox Hall

Architect: BarlisWedlick Architects Location: Hudson Valley, NY

This simple, barn-inspired structure is the centerpiece of a sustainable compound that includes a rehabilitated barn, a natural pool, and a three-story screened tower with a wood-burning sauna.