Posts tagged with "Austin":

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Delve into “Piranesi’s Rome” at The Blanton Museum of Art in Austin

With more than 40 prints examining the antiquities and architecture of Rome, along with large-scale maps of the city, books, and plaster casts of Greek and Roman architectural fragments, Piranesi’s Rome celebrates Giovanni Battista Piranesi, regarded as one of the greatest printmakers of the 18th century. Piranesi, who considered himself an architect as well as an artist, is best known for his use of the etching medium to create prints of Rome’s architecture, including the ancient Roman aqueduct system, and fantastical buildings that could only exist in the dream world.

Piranesi’s Rome Blanton Museum of Art 200 E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Austin, TX Through August 20

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Kory Bieg of Austin’s OTA+ on how parametric design can shape structures

Aluminum composite panels have been making headlines of late for all the wrong reasons. The subject of scourge was at the heart—or rather, outer edges—of the Grenfell Tower disaster in the U.K. that saw a fire take the lives of an estimated 80 people as flames traveled via the building's aluminum composite cladding. However, at Facades+ AM conference in Austin yesterday morning, the material was shown in a new light. As part of the opening discussion panel, titled Digital Design and Fabrication Frontiers, principal at OTA+, Kory Bieg demonstrated how aluminum composite panels can be used to make three-dimensional structures such as arches and vaults. Speaking to The Architect's Newspaper (AN), Bieg described how he used parametric design tools such as the Kangaroo plugin for Grasshopper to design Caret 6. The vaulting structure, designed and fabricated by his Design V Studio at the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture, was part of an exhibition on metal structures in 2013. Caret 6 is comprised of large folded panels and responds to a brief that called for a structure using aggregation, weaving, and stacking techniques to create an assembly that could transition from a flat surface to a volumetric enclosure.
"To enable a smooth transition from a flat, two-dimensional ground surface into a volumetric, three-dimensional vault, the studio used a diamond pattern that could work as both an aggregate and woven rib-system. Though the diamond pattern appears to be series of stacked cells, the structure is actually three layers of overlapping ribs," said OTA+ on its website. "Large, continuous primary ribs form the seams from vault to vault, while secondary ribs span between each seam. Tertiary ribs complete the web and enclose each cell to create a rigid structure."
"A core goal of the studio was to introduce asymmetry into what would otherwise be a symmetrical form. The vault is roughly eleven foot at its highest point, enclosing a space small enough for occupants to engage directly with the surface, a condition atypical for most vaults which often frame larger and much taller spaces. "Caret 6 was designed to fill an already existing space," said Bieg, "so it was necessary to design a geometry that responded to the existing room, especially at the edges, where the vaulting forms project toward the walls."
Bieg benefitted from using Robot Structural Analysis which enabled him to model and test different Aluminum Composite Panel configurations to find the optimum structural solution. "Ultimately, we added a layer of attachment details that included thousands of O-rings and binder rings to ensure stability in the event a lateral force or unexpected point load is applied (ie. someone hanging on the edge of the cantilever), but in its resting state, Caret 6 does not require any fasteners," the firm said. Bieg was joined by Anthony Birchler of fabrication firm Zahner. "Digital manufacturing plays an enormous role in not only what we do, but the changing landscape of architecture and design fields," he said speaking to AN. "Designers want to understand how they can interface with a firm like Zahner—and here's the big part—they need to know how to establish this kind of precedent with their clients in our industry. Our presentation shows how firms are accomplishing unique architectural works. This isn't theoretical. This is our practice, and we want to show you how you can do this kind of work"
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Austin student housing tower bends into shape

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Rhode Partners, an interdisciplinary design studio that unites architecture, interior design, and master planning, has recently completed a student housing project situated just outside the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. A soft curvature along the exterior envelope of the tower organizes the residential portion of the building along an asymmetrical linear grid, while custom-designed clothespin-shaped columns help transfer the load of the tower structure down into a parking garage below.
  • Facade Manufacturer Fabral (metal wall panels); American Fiber Cement (fiber cement wall panels); AMICO (garage screening); Thermal Windows (unit windows); Oldcastle (curtain wall)
  • Architects Rhode Partners
  • Facade Installer Texas 5th Wall, McInerney & Associates
  • Facade Consultants n/a
  • Location Austin, TX
  • Date of Completion 2016
  • System Cast-in-place concrete frame
  • Products 1/2-inch corrugated metal wall panels (Fabral); Minerit HD (American Fiber Cement); AMICO Apex 01 (garage screening); 4150 Series Thermal Windows (unit windows); Reliance by Oldcastle (curtain wall)
The design of the project was inspired by "avoiding stereotypes" of what typical apartment housing looks like, according to Brett Rhode, director of Rhode Partners. "We wanted to avoid the common L-shaped building scenario, so we developed a way to make a prominent widening of the footprint that gave us some interesting form to work with architecturally and also provided a way to increase the rentable square footage." The building envelope of the residential tower is constructed of light gauge non-load bearing metal framing with two cladding systems that respond to different areas of the building. The first is a rain screen system with a layer of mineral wool exterior insulation. Rainscreen materials vary from metal cladding to fiber cement and high-density laminate cladding. The other exterior cladding assembly was an exterior insulation and finish system (EIFS), which is employed in the curved sections of the primary facade. Below the tower sits a three-story parking garage podium that was clad with expanded aluminum sheet panels; these offer visual screening to parked cars. The panels are attached to horizontal tensioned cables, eliminating the need for a backup steel framework. This detailing, along with the modular panel size, offered an economical solution to the garage facade. One of the most recognizable elements in the building design is several projecting balcony elements that responded to the client’s program requirements of providing a select number of balconies for the building. The architects wrapped a cantilevered steel frame in perforated metal panels and used fiberglass gratings for flooring, treating the balconies as translucent figural shapes that project beyond the facade. Rhode said, "it seemed like an interesting opportunity to use them to enliven the facade. We turned them into objects that don’t immediately look like balconies.” A core focus of the Austin-based architecture firm is to integrate BIM and IES energy modeling on all of their projects, which span civic, multifamily, hotel, office, and retail markets. The project team for University House Austin was able to collaborate with the general contractor (Rogers O’Brian Construction) to develop an initial BIM model that was referenced throughout the construction of the project. “This was a big reason why we were able to get a more interesting facade within budget, “ said Rhode. “We also use digital fabrication techniques in our model shop, especially in the early design phases.” Rhode will be participating in Austin's upcoming Facades+AM conference, where he will be joining other local architects, engineers, and planners in a session titled “Austin’s Changing Skyline.” He will be focusing on the technological aspects of the envelope of one of their latest projects—The Independent—as they relate to aesthetics, energy usage, and cost. The event is part of a multi-city conference series on high-performance building enclosures. More information on Facades+AM, which organizes ten presenters into a three-session morning breakfast and networking event, can be found here
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Arthur Andersson on his approach to Austin high-rises

Austin, Texas is a hot place to be. In fact, according to Arthur Andersson, it's "hotter than the hinges of hell." The Austin-based architect is a principal at Andersson-Wise Architects and will be speaking at this month's Facades+ AM conference in the city. He spoke to The Architect's Newspaper (AN) about a recent Austin project, Block 21, and how he combated the city's climate.

Though its official name doesn't give much away, Block 21 incorporates a W Hotel, residences, retail, offices, and a recording studio for KLRU where the show Austin City Limits Live at the Moody Theater is filmed. The building was Andersson's first ever high-rise (Block 21 climbs to 37 stories) but the architect was committed to producing a "useful" rather than a "pure" building.

"Many architects would have put protruding balconies on both sides of the building," claimed Andersson, who instead, opted to recess some on one side. "I posed a question to the Mayor, 'do you ever see people on those north balconies?'" Mayor Will Wynn's response was predictably a "no." Subsequently, Block 21's balconies provide shade in the summer and let the sun in and heat condos in the winter. "None of the four are sides doing the same thing, they're all different and based on the sun’s position," Andersson added. "Recessing balconies is like giving the building sunglasses."

Another method of tackling Austin's climate was through color. "Here, for some reason, a lot of the taller buildings are either beige or brown—or at least they were," said Andersson. "All these colors made you feel hotter than you already are! In Austin the sky gets super blue, so we wound up with a color scheme that almost disappears into the sky."

"The second thing that we did, and we the first building in Austin to do this, was to use a curtain wall so the structure was all inside and you couldn't see any mullions. As a result, the glass can have a very minimal connection, you just see [a] sheer face." As for the rest of the facade, particularly at the base of the building where the recording studio is located, compressed cement panels from Swisspearl acted as a rainscreen and provided a matte finish—a contrast the reflective glass. 

Staying with the lower portion of the building, Andersson explained how Bill Zahner, president and CEO of A. Zahner Company, helped with the sheet metal work to create pre-finish weathered steel look for the car park, lobby, and base, which came across to Andersson as being like "ruins" when twinned with concrete.

Andersson will be speaking at Facades+ AM this July 18 in Austin. There he will discuss Block 21 in greater detail and joining him (albeit on a different panel) will be Anthony Birchler, vice president of engineering at A. Zahner Company.

Seating is limited. To find out more, please visit am.facadesplus.com.

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Austin is changing, but where’s it headed to next?

Anyone who keeps tabs on Austin, Texas's built environment on Twitter will be familiar with "#ATXrising." If its presence and frequency tell us anything, it's that Austin is on the up—literally. Is this a good thing? Tall buildings mean more density, which potentially means a more pedestrian-friendly city. In the 1970s, however, one man had other ideas about how to achieve this. Lauded as "Austin’s grandfather of New Urbanism," Sinclair Black envisioned a dense city populated by buildings no taller than six stories. Sinclair didn't like cars then, and he doesn't today. Interstate-35, which still carves up Austin's Downtown, is something Sinclair wants re-routed in order to reconnect the city. This is yet to happen and, likewise, his mid-rise dream has not been realized, as Arthur Andersson, principal at Austin-based Andersson-Wise Architects (the firm behind the 37-story mixed use hotel known as Block 21) can attest. Another Austin architect, Brett Rhode, principal at Austin-based Rhode Partners (the firm behind The Independent, a 58-story high-rise that will be Austin's tallest) also concurs. That said, density, or rather, faux-density, has emerged. Zoning requirements at Main Street, for example, stipulate that buildings wider than 150 feet should be made to appear like multiple buildings, each no wider than 100 feet. Often, this appearance is achieved through the building's massing or the facade. Black, Andersson, and Rhode will be talking in depth about Austin's changing skyline and touching on topics such as density and pedestrianization at Facades+AM Austin on July 18th. Also on hand at Facades+ will be Heath May, director of HKS LINE; Kory Bieg, principal at OTA+; and Anthony Birchler, vice president of engineering at Zahner. They will be engaging in a panel discussion on new techniques for facade fabrication. And because all the best things come in threes, a final panel will look at the constantly evolving relationship between engineers and architects. On hand to weigh in on the subject will be Chuck Naeve, founding principal of Architectural Engineers Collaborative, Gordon B. Bingaman, an associate principal at Antenora Architects, and Ken Jones, principal at Miró Rivera Architects. Seating is limited. To find out more, please visit am.facadesplus.com.
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Miró Rivera talks about the symbiotic relationship between architects and engineers

Engineers and architects. It can be a fickle relationship at times, stemming back to university where the typical back and forth between students arguing for their own self-importance. But, in the adult world, the relationship is seldom so tumultuous. Ken Jones, principal at Austin studio Miró Rivera Architects, was on hand to explain. Jones said how he had been working with engineer Chuck Naeve and his firm Architectural Engineers Collaborative, since the late 1990s, not long after the architecture firm had formed. "We have been working with him almost as long as we have been a firm," Jones noted. "It's hard for us not to think about structure when doing a project and Naeve has the same approach—he understands the role of the architect; it's not just about us designing the shape." This relationship came in handy when the pair worked on the Chinmaya Mission Hindu temple in Austin. Naeve worked with the architects to strategize the impact of budget constraints and how to integrate non-structural materials. For the building's elaborate skylight, galvanized piping (like what you would see on a chain link fence) was employed. "On the face of it, this is very mundane material, but we looked to see how it could be used structurally," said Jones. Below the skylight, a canopy of metal panels alternating in color (though of a similar tone) comprise the roofscape. In addition to this, a stone precinct wall of limestone slabs (each was individually sponsored as part of the fundraising effort) combined, as The Architect's Newspaper's Ben Koush put, "pragmatism and poetry." For another project in Austin, Life Works, Jones echoed Koush, pointing out how the "structural columns had a very poetic role" within the building. Jones also referenced a third project, the Vista Residence, and another dwelling involving a boat dock, which is currently under construction, due for completion this Fall. The Austin residence looks onto a river and is dominated by a boat dock, which, according to Jones, allows the "structure to be the architecture of the project and let every detail shine through." He and Naeve will be speaking about this and the other two projects on a panel at the upcoming Facades+AM conference in Austin this July. "The Vista Residence is a really good place to demonstrate how these architect-engineer projects pan out on the field," Jones explained, adding that the panel will look at the architect-engineer relationship in greater detail. To find out more about the Facades+ AM Austin conference and register, visit am.facadesplus.com. Seating is limited.
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Austin’s Torchy’s Tacos flagship location pays tribute to nostalgic diner

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Torchy’s Tacos' new flagship location is situated on the former site of Austin-based Fran’s Hamburgers who symbolized nostalgia for the archetypal Texas drive-in diner. The structure’s iconic red “X” and “Y” shaped columns pay tribute to Fran's which also featured a modernist red steel perimeter structure. 
  • Facade Manufacturer The Salinas Group (steel fabrication); Binswanger Glass (storefront); Empire Roofing (standing seam); Villa Lagoon Tile & Cement Tile Shop (encaustic concrete tile)
  • Architects Chioco Design
  • Facade Installer The Salinas Group (steel construction); Alamo Tile (reflectors & encaustic concrete tile); Binswanger Glass (storefront); Empire Roofing (standing seam)
  • Facade Consultants n/a
  • Location Austin, TX
  • Date of Completion 2016
  • System Steel frame with storefront glazing
  • Products Binswanger Commercial Glass Storefront, custom fabricated steel structure, standing seam roofing
Led by architecture firm Chioco Design, the project integrates structural, electrical, HVAC, and daylighting systems into an extruded roof profile that extends beyond the facade to establish a large outdoor dining area. The architects say this helped to connect inside with outside: “The bright red columns support a crenelated roof profile extruded through the entire building, seamlessly connecting inside to out, and allowing for the addition of numerous north-facing skylights which provide an abundance of consistent natural light.” The roof is clad in a standing seam metal that folds down the side elevation and alternates between two coated finishes. This subtly reinforces a striped color scheme that extends to the interior of the restaurant by means of red tinted glazing and carefully positioned aluminum storefront mullions. Chioco Design said the project prioritized material quality: “We typically like to choose durable materials that give us an opportunity to experiment with texture, pattern, and color. We are big fans of concrete, steel, and wood and look to use these materials in various forms. You can sense their weight and timeless qualities.” This emphasis on materiality might best be seen on the west elevation which is covered in red road reflectors to produce a dazzling effect. The unique material “emphasizes the eclectic character of the neighborhood,” according to Chioco Design, who had previously worked with the restaurant chain to develop a set of dynamic material palettes for renovations to other locations. Also of note are the installation of encaustic cement tiles, offering unlimited pattern and color options, thoughtfully used on both interior and exterior surfaces to delineate entry and queuing areas. The building is located along Austin's South Congress shopping and cultural district and is open for business. Wondering what's the best thing to order at Torchy's? The architects recommend not passing up on the queso and green chile pork tacos!
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The Contemporary Austin gets a striking new rooftop addition

In December of last year, New York–based Lewis Tsurumaki Lewis Architects (LTL) completed its renovation of The Contemporary Austin-Jones Center which, among other improvements, includes the freshly inaugurated Moody Rooftop pavilion. The $3 million dollar renovation responds to the enormous growth of the institution and its popular public programming as well as the increasing scale of Austin’s architecture. This project is one in a series of designs that the organization has commissioned in recent years including the ongoing master planning of its sculpture park at Laguna Gloria by Cambridge, Massachusetts–based landscape architecture firm Reed-Hilderbrand. Since the museum opened its downtown location in 2010, the roof deck has been a central feature of its public engagement strategy and often hosts outdoor film screenings and music performances. This upgrade allows The Contemporary to hold larger events with more control over the open air roof space. LTL designed a deceptively thin roof canopy that hovers 23 feet above the original structure with stark white curtains that can be drawn to enclose the space for year-round use. The museum also moved its administrative office to Laguna Gloria, thereby allowing for Jones Center to double its ground floor area for exhibitions and upgrade its mechanical systems to accommodate a more diverse range of art installations. The building is situated along Congress Avenue, Austin's central thoroughfare, with a direct view to the State Capitol, making the museum one of the city’s most visible cultural institutions. Coincidental with the re-opening of the museum was the installation of a text artwork by artist Jim Hodges that wraps the edge of the roof. The piece consists of 27 seven-foot-tall block letters reading “With Liberty and Justice for All” lit from behind and encased with iridescent mirrored surfaces. The eponymously titled piece is in the public gaze at all times and will reportedly remain in place for three years, though the architect re-designed the roof to potentially mount the letters permanently. Earlier this year, directly following the presidential inauguration, both the building and the art were the backdrop for the Women’s March in Austin, underscoring the social responsibility that cultural institutions have to shape a city’s identity. With cooperation between distinctive architectural design and timely public artwork, the museum aims to vault itself from a sometimes scrappy nonprofit to a growing powerhouse among national art institutions.
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Lake|Flato Architects designing a new home for the Holdsworth Center in Austin

In West Austin along the Colorado River, a 44-acre site has been suggested as a home for the Holdsworth Center—a non-profit organization that aims to improve the quality of state school education in Texas. The center will invite staff from six districts and work with Texas school district superintendents, principals, and administrators as part of the program.

At the time of writing, the project is currently going through planning, and a Planned Unit Development (PUD) application was submitted earlier this month to the city of Austin. Speaking to The Architect's Newspaper, Justin Garrison of Lake|Flato Architects, the San Antonio firm behind the scheme, said they were trying to "change the current zoning of single-family residential to make this project feasible in the future."

Of the large site, only half the land will be developed on while the rest of the natural landscape will be preserved. "The master plan aims to create an innovative retreat and educational center where users will be exposed to various collaborative learning and research opportunities within the facilities, as well as the freedom to engage the outdoors and surrounding landscape," said Garrison who added the design will "strive to be light on the land.... The Holdsworth Center aims to maintain the existing ecological zones on the site including the riparian and wetland edge along Lake Austin."

Along the waterfront is a thicket of cypress trees which visually separate the development from the water. Garrison explained further, describing how a few structures such as pavilions, day docks, and boat docks will protrude from the wooded riparian and upper bluff edges to give users 180 plus degrees of views overlooking the Pennybacker “360” bridge and surrounding hill country. "Within the project boundaries, the various buildings are located and oriented to frame various types and scales of open space, provide vistas across the natural meadow, allow a sense of the landscape, natural ecology, and water collection and treatment flow through the site, as well as provide optimal natural daylight within the buildings and solar energy collection," said Garrison.

Programmatically, the center will include an: educational learning center with classrooms and event spaces; administration offices for Holdsworth Center staff and visiting researchers; an academic village where users will be housed on site with a few casitas for extended stay users and various pavilions and day/boat docks (as mentioned above) to be used for educational, recreational and event purposes.

Austin-based Ten Eyck Landscape Architects are also working on the project. So far no dates for completion can be confirmed as the city is yet to vote on the PUD process. Lake|Flato also said they could not determine the project's cost. 

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New Dean Michelle Addington talks about her vision for UT Austin School of Architecture

This summer the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture (UTSoA) will be the latest school in recent years to appoint new leadership, welcoming Professor Michelle Addington of Yale University as its new dean. Addington will succeed Interim Dean Elizabeth Danze, who took the helm of the institution last year after the abrupt departure of Frederick Steiner. According to Maurie McInnis, the executive vice president and provost at UT Austin, “Michelle is a perfect fit.” She added that Professor Addington “brings fresh eyes and new ideas that will continue supporting the robust breadth and depth of interdisciplinary work happening at the school, and she will lead conversations that advance the field in the 21st century." The Architect’s Newspaper (AN) spoke with Addington last week about her vision for UTSoA, emerging issues for designers in the built environment, and her eagerness to be walking distance from Franklin’s Barbecue. AN: What initially interested you about UTSoA as an institution? Michelle Addington: I wanted this position for a very long time. I always kept my eye on different deanships and interviewed off and on over the years, but none of them felt right to me. When this became available, I knew it was one I really wanted. Part of it has to do with the fact that I come from a Texas family and there is a sense of home. My mother is from Austin, so it is a part of the country that really resonates with me. Another part of it has to do with the fact that [UTSoA] has such a storied legacy in the development of contemporary design education. One can look to the Texas Rangers... [they] were an incredibly formative part of architectural education. And, the fact that the full range of design disciplines are represented, everything from architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design, community and regional planning, sustainable design, and historic preservation. And a robust combination of degrees from undergraduate to PhD. I feel that it's a place that is right for me as an individual but also a place where I feel as though I can bring my experience to the existing faculty and students and build on their strengths. In the last few years, the school has attracted significant funding and progressive initiatives. Examples include the U.S. DOT Transit Research Grant, a new faculty position for the study of Race and Gender, and a high-tech Robotics Lab, to name a few. Though these are early days, can you talk a little about these initiatives and the direction you see the school going under your leadership? If you think about the field of architecture writ large—about all of the design disciplines—they were heavily product-centric for centuries. The digital turn at the end of the 20th century brought forward methods that enable us to deal with multiple contexts, multiple terrains, and different kinds of content. We became incredible masters at manipulating this varied terrain but mostly in terms of dealing with what I consider to be ‘contested boundaries.’ It’s easy to think about a building as being bounded by its site and envelope. But when you start to look at [architecture] as an insertion for instance in ecological, economic, spatial, political boundaries, [it] can accurately map and open up questions that I don't think any other discipline can do. All of these initiatives—the DOT, the Robotics Lab, the program dealing with gender and racial diversity—are looking to insert [designers] into the center of questions that heretofore have been addressed by other disciplines. I think the University of Texas has been on the mark in recognizing what we need to do [in this respect] and it is one of the reasons I'm so excited to be there. One of the things that I spoke to the [UTSoA] faculty about was that I see interdisciplinarity differently than I think many traditional schools of architecture have seen it. All too often we think about how we fold in content from other disciplines—that is not interdisciplinarity to me. That's cherry picking information to support what it is one wants to do. Real interdisciplinarity actually means that you have to be involved in, understand, and affect the 'other'—other frameworks and conflicting points of view. And, you have to de-center yourself in order to do that. You are making some news as the first woman to be named dean of UTSoA, succeeding Elizabeth Danze as Interim Dean. Your credentials I think speak for themselves but do you perhaps have any thoughts about the increasing prominence of women in leadership positions at architecture schools? And in the profession? I have to correct that because Elizabeth Danze is the first woman dean [of UTSoA]. She may be interim but she is the trailblazer here. She is one of my favorite people. There are many ways that practice leads academia in terms of its reflection of the world at large. However, this is a case where practice is lagging. It's going to take some time. I think one of the things that would be interesting to talk about with a larger number of women in the field... is this idea of the ‘other.’ [Women] are used to being on the margins, away from the center, practicing on the edges. A number of years ago there was a book put together by Lance Hosey and Kira Gould called Women in Green: Voices of Sustainable Design. They had noticed there was a disproportionate number of women who were working in sustainable design. You are going to find this for a lot of interdisciplinary areas that are on the edge. I think that as we start looking, again, at this negotiated terrain that is not so centered on the building object, we are going to find and recognize a lot more parity from a gender standpoint. There might be some pendulum swinging for a while because we have big problems to deal with in this world. All I can wait for is the day when it doesn't even occur to someone to say ‘woman architect’ but simply ‘architect.’ I want that term to disappear from our [discourse]. As a public institution, UT Austin operates quite differently than a private school like Yale, where you currently teach. Recently, we have seen several controversial policies emerge in Texas such as Senate Bill 6 (the so-called “bathroom bill”) and the open carry law which went into effect last summer. With these in mind, how do you see architecture schools engaging with similar issues of public space and more broadly how does this translate into practice? I can't say yet how it translates into practice. But what I can say is these issues are another reason why I want to be at [UTSoA]. I want to come precisely because these debates are on the table. It is very easy to be critical of how others are thinking about particular situations, but part of understanding and embracing the 'other' is that you have to fully embrace it. You have to engage yourself in that discourse no matter what you believe for yourself. We are in a really messy world. We are not going to be able to come up with solutions by bracketing ourselves and narrowing our domains or territories so that we are only surrounded with like-minded individuals. I am most interested in figuring out how we negotiate these radically different voices. How we map progress that accepts these differences yet at the same time protects the most vulnerable. In design disciplines, we have an enormous responsibility for the health, safety, and welfare of society at large which means we have to tackle these issues head on. What we really need to do is figure out how to engage. On a lighter note, you will begin your post on July 1st of this year; and, as you well-know having attended Tulane, the south has an unforgiving summer heat. Weather aside, though, what are you looking forward to most about relocating to Austin?  Well, my grandparents lived outside of Dallas and I used to spend my summers at their unairconditioned ranch. I've never forgotten that. Number one, though, is BBQ. No matter what you try in the north nobody can make decent BBQ and I'm tired of my friends from New England constantly dragging me to places where they claim that it's the best BBQ—no. And driving, I shouldn't say this because I'm a sustainability person, but I miss a good road trip. I've never been to Marfa, that's so high on my list.
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150-year-old New York bar finds a new home in Austin, Texas

The 150-year-old Cedar Tavern bar in New York City once hosted luminaries such as Jackson Pollack, Willem De Kooning, Bob Dylan, and Jimi Hendrix in Greenwich Village. Now that very same bar lives on at Eberly, South Austin’s new restaurant. When the Cedar Tavern closed in 2006, Eberly partners John Scott and Eddy Patterson bought the nearly 12-foot-tall and 40-foot-long mahogany bar, took some photographs of it, and transferred it in hundred of pieces to a storage unit back in Austin. Then, they set about finding an appropriate home for their haul, landing on a former 15,000-square-foot print shop on South Lamar Boulevard. ICON Design + Build worked with Clayton & Little Architects and interior designer Mickie Spencer to incorporate the Cedar Tavern Bar into a series of spaces including a dining room, coffee shop, and 4,000-square-foot rooftop patio. ICON’s Jonas Durfor, a master carpenter, reconstructed the bar. Reused materials permeate the space, whose prefabricated construction allowed for design interventions without compromising the original components—vintage cotton gin windows were interspersed throughout the interior spaces to allow light in, while the original building’s concrete floor tiles were reused in the patio. Despite a design inspired by an eclectic mix of art nouveau, Victorian, midcentury modern, and British greenhouses from the 1800s, the space is tied together with its color scheme: blues, greens, brass, and mahogany. Each room is coordinated to allow patrons to spend their entire day at the Eberly, from coffee in the study, to drinks on the bar or in the patio, to a meal in the dining room.

Eberly 615 South Lamar Boulevard Austin, Texas Tel: 512-916-9000 Architect: ICON Design + Build and Clayton & Little Architects

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Michelle Addington named dean at University of Texas at Austin

The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture has just announced the selection of a new dean: Professor Michelle Addington of Yale University. At Yale, Addington is the Hines Professor of Sustainable Development and she holds a joint appointment in Forestry and Environmental Studies and Architecture. The university hopes she will bring an "interdisciplinary perspective" to her new position. Here is the full announcement from the university:
Dear UT community, I am excited to announce that Michelle Addington will serve as the next dean of the School of Architecture effective July 1, 2017. Michelle comes to us from Yale University where she holds joint appointments in the School of Architecture as well as the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Educated as an architect and engineer, she brings an impressive array of experience and expertise, both in academia and applied practice. Over the past 20 years she has dedicated herself to education as a teacher, mentor, and leader at Yale and Harvard. Earlier in her career she worked at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and at DuPont as an engineer and manager. The interdisciplinary perspective she brings will be a tremendous asset to the school and university, and I am thrilled that she has agreed to lead one of the top architecture programs in the country. Michelle holds undergraduate degrees from Tulane University and Temple University, and master and doctorate degrees from the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Her teaching and research focuses on sustainable energy systems, advanced materials, and new technologies. In 2009, Architect Magazine recognized her as one of the top ten architecture faculty in the nation. I also want to take this opportunity to thank Elizabeth Danze. As interim dean, I could not have asked for a more effective leader and partner throughout this process. She is highly respected by her colleagues and the campus community and has led the school with distinction this year. Please join me in thanking Elizabeth for her leadership and service. Michelle is an exciting addition to the Longhorn community. Please join me in welcoming her to UT. Sincerely, Maurie McInnis Executive Vice President and Provost The University of Texas at Austin