Posts tagged with "Atelier Jean Nouvel":

Jean Nouvel’s Miami Beach high-rise is back on schedule

Monad Terrace is its name. Jean Nouvel is its claim to fame. Its submerged future is ... quite a shame. After a period of uncertainty, the developers of the Miami Beach tower, New York-based JDS Development, have finally secured the $62.5 million necessary to undertake the project. Now the company has the go-ahead to complete the tower squarely in the middle of one of Miami Beach's most vulnerable flood zones. The Miami Beach tower by Nouvel made a splash last year for the wild and overgrown manmade lagoon at its base. Looking like a modernist structure reclaimed by nature after an environmental disaster à la J.G. Ballard, the structure may well fulfill its own prophecy. JDS' Michael Stern told Curbed Miami that the design "is very conscious of what is going on to changes to the streets and concerns about sea level rise." What this means is that the building will have a below-grade car garage to displace floodwater as well as incorporate landscaping features meant to absorb water, including the lagoon. Ateliers Jean Nouvel stated that the development will be the first condo of its kind to be built surpassing Miami Beach's revised flood regulations, at 11.5 feet above sea level. The interiors are minimalist and luxurious, with marble and oak siding and floor-to-ceiling glass windows boasting expansive views of the Atlantic Ocean. The building's 80 residential units contain terraces framed by draping bougainvillea and passion vine. Beneath the vines, the structure's facade consists of an aluminum honeycomb sawtooth screen designed to diffuse direct sun and create the visual effect of light playing on water. The question now is whether the building's flood alleviation measures will be enough to shield the structure from a Category 5 hurricane. Awareness of Miami's Sisyphean struggles with the rising tide has never been higher, but investment seems to keep pouring in for steel-and-glass boxes on the sea. The project is scheduled to be completed near the end of 2019.

Jean Nouvel’s vegetated Miami tower touted for its man-made lagoon

West Avenue in Miami Beach is set for a Jean Nouvel high rise surrounded by an elaborate man-made lagoon.  The tower will be covered with suspended vegetation that, at least in renderings, casts the structure in a distinctly green hue. This is Nouvel's second attempt at building in the city after his Grove Heights project lost a competition in 2013. "Monad Terrace" as the 14-story tower is known, is set to top out at 149 feet, just a hair below the city's height limit of 150 feet. Developers JDS also recruited Kobi Karp Architecture and Interior Design to work on the scheme which boasts a glass facade encircled by water and a green wall, covered in foliage on one side. Inside, the structure will hold approximately 80 residential units that will offer two–five bedroom layouts, each with views out three or four sides of the building. Topping the structure are two penthouses, each with its own private pool. To maintain privacy, reflective screens—that allow views out but obscure view in—sit in front windows, creating a staggered facade. The lagoon, however, is the complex's showpiece. Occupants can stroll up to seating in the middle and edges of the lagoon or take a dip in the swimming pool along the bay where a waterfall is planned. According to managing partner at JDS Development Group, Michael Stern, the pool will be visible from the bay. It's not all good news though. Elaborate water features may be easy on the eye, but rising sea levels are a very real threat to those along the coast on Miami's South Beach. The issue surfaced late last year when The New Yorker published findings that said the idyllic retreats of the area could be underwater in under 50 years. Nouvel's design however, looks to be high and dry. "Our design is very conscious of what is going on to changes to the streets and concerns about sea level rise," said Stern speaking to Curbed Miami. Monad Terrace will be the first building in the West Avenue vicinity to encompass the higher street level requirements. Nouvel has been inclusive of the potential disastrous surroundings in his design. Landscaping dotted around the building can absorb water, meanwhile below street-level garages can act as water-tight "bathtubs." Speaking on the matter, Stern commented that "the landscape is designed that if any salt water intruded it is tough enough to live through that event."

If at first you don’t succeed: Jean Nouvel’s leaning towers of Paris gets planning approval after initial rejection

After an initial rejection by officials from the Paris Council, French architect Jean Nouvel has been awarded planning permission for his firm's so-called Duo Tower project on the Eastern banks of the Seine. Located in the Quartier De La Gare district of Paris, the project follows on the heels of another pyramidal tower by Herzog & De Meuron planned for the city. Since Paris has dropped its construction height limit, the project is one of the first to be jumping on the high-rise bandwagon. Taking advantage of the new lack of restrictions, the taller tower will rise to 590 feet while the lower block will reach just over 400. Nouvel's towers have been a source of controversy in the French capital. A fierce opponent of Parisian high-rises, Mayor Patrice vowed to fight the scheme earlier in the year. Speaking to Le Parisien he said "I will attack this permit with a gracious solution." Unimpressed with the towers winning planning approval, he went to on to say, "the permit/license of construction was validated on the basis of a grossly false photomontage," arguing that the renders did not accurately portray the visual effect the building would have on the skyline. Touted to cost over $570 million, the mixed-use towers will provide over one million square feet—about 24 acres—of office space, and include a hotel, auditorium, restaurant, and retail area. Of this space, some will be accessible to the public with the restaurant offering views over Paris and along the river. Construction is set to begin next year with the project aiming to be complete by 2020.

French Architect Jean Nouvel Wins Lawsuit Against Controversial Philharmonie de Paris

The Paris Supreme Court has ruled in favor of French architect Jean Nouvel, who filed a lawsuit against the Philharmonie de Paris in December last year alleging “non-compliance” with his designs. Pending his April 16 hearing, Nouvel requested a court order to be legally disassociated from the project. The Parisian architect called for emergency litigation to halt construction of the concert hall on account of recurring delays and skyrocketing costs, which had hiked prices from the original $217 million to an estimated $419 million. Claiming that he and his firm, Ateliers Jean Nouvel, were not responsible, the architect demanded a court mandate that “modifying work” be undertaken on the 26 parts of the building that had deviated from his original design. This includes parapets, foyers, facades, the promenade, and acoustic elements within the 2,400-seat auditorium in Parc de la Villette, Paris. Nouvel and his architectural practice pointedly boycotted the controversial January 14 opening of the concert hall on the grounds that the project was incomplete. "The building is not finished," Nouvel said in a statement to Dezeen. "There were no acoustic tests of the concert hall. The schedule did not allow the architectural and technical requirements to be respected—this despite all the warnings which I have been giving since 2013." In an editorial for French newspaper Le Monde, Nouvel revealed that he had been "contractually sidelined, with the threat of being chucked off the job." Nouvel had petitioned to have his name and image removed from all references to the building prior to the hearing. The Pritzker Prize–awarded architect won an international competition to design the Philharmonie in 2007, with a proposal that featured a sloping 171-foot-high metal roof which visitors could walk on and jagged, almost crooked-looking facades clad in cast aluminum, which Nouvel selected for its “pearly nuances and delicateness.” Although the court ruled Wednesday against the opposing party, legal proceedings are far from over. “Today, the court requires additional detailed and comparative information to make a judgment,” a press release from Ateliers Jean Nouvel noted. “The court’s ruling is only a first step for Jean Nouvel, who continues to fight to ensure that the Philharmonie lives up to its mission and ambition.”

The world’s “best tall building” is Jean Nouvel’s high-rise jungle in Sydney

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) last night named Atelier Jean Nouvel's One Central Park (OCP) in Sydney the year's best tall building. OCP turned the site of a former brewery into a residential high-rise lush with hydroponic hanging gardens and a massive mirror cantilevered over the building's courtyard that harvests sunlight for heat and lighting year-round. One Central Park, considered the world's tallest vertical garden, bested projects from SOM, OMA, and Cutler Anderson Architects for the award. Those buildings—a twisting tower in Dubai, a melded mass of high-rises, and a midcentury office tower reborn as a green icon—each won regional awards from CTBUH. But One Central Park's use of greenery by botantist and green wall guru Patrick Blanc won the day. “Seeing this project for the first time stopped me dead,” said juror and CTBUH Executive Director Antony Wood. “There have been major advances in the incorporation of greenery in high-rise buildings over the past few years—but nothing on the scale of this building has been attempted or achieved.” Accepting the award in Chicago on behalf of his firm, Atliers Jean Nouvel Partner Bertram Beissel said the project increases the visibility of sustainable design. "If we do all these sustainable things and no one can see them, do they really exist?" Beissel said. "The choices we make for a sustainable future cannot be made in the future. They must be made today.” Read more about the building on CTBUH's website. OMA’s CCTV Tower in Beijing won last year’s competition.

Jean Nouvel–Designed Louvre Abu Dhabi Begins Construction

French Pritzker Prize–winning architect Jean Nouvel's design for Louvre Abu Dhabi has begun construction after a series of delays. The building's most prominent feature is a 180-meter-diameter  dome. The design of the dome is culturally relevant as well as utilitarian. The shape is prominent in traditional Arabian architecture. As the Louvre Abu Dhabi website describes, it is “an emblematic feature...evoking the mosque, the mausoleum, and the madrasa.” The dome's expanse also protects the building and its visitors from the sun. Carefully formulated geometric apertures in the all-white structure allow diffused and dappled daylight inside the museum, while mitigating heat gain. Nouvel designed the dappled pattern to emulate interlaced palm fronds, which are traditionally used in Arabic countries for thatch roofs. Nouvel described his vision for the 64,000 square meter site thus:

"A microclimate is created by drawing on sensations that have been explored countless times in great Arab architecture, which is based on the mastery of light and geometry . . . a structure made up of shadows, of movement and discovery."

Nouvel was awarded the design commission for the Louvre Abu Dhabi in 2010. It was originally meant to be completed in 2012. However, in January of that year, the Financial Times reported that after a "the conclusion of a government spending review led by Sheikh Hazza bin Zayed Al-Nahyan, vice-chairman of the executive council," the Tourism Development & Investment Company in Abu Dhabi set the museum back 3 years to 2015. Set on Saadiyat Island, the Louvre Abu Dhabi is the first of three art museum branches meant to shore up the area as a cultural hub within the United Arab Emirates. However, all have faced major delays and completion dates pushed years into the future. All renderings courtesy Atelier Jean Nouvel.

AN Video> Jane’s Carousel: Your Thoughts?

It's been a couple of week's since Jane's Carousel opened to the public on the Brooklyn Waterfront, allowing us time to reflect on the rainy opening day and see just how the new attraction is being received. It's seems Jean Nouvel's pavilion is a study in contrasts, particularly on cold gloom of the opening ceremony when we first stopped by. We made a short impressionistic collage of our observations including the carnivalesque merriment going on inside the pavilion set against the sober geometry outside. (You might also spot Nouvel himself taking a ride or an overly-excited Marty Markowitz astride one of the wooden horses.) Granted the acrylic-paneled doors of Nouvel's pavilion can be thrown open to the surrounding park, but the celebratory atmosphere seems contained, anchored even. Viewed from across the park, the riverside building takes on the feel of a ferry terminal. Inside, however, the playful carousel offers distorted views through the giant door panels that give downtown Manhattan and the Brooklyn Bridge a fun-house-mirror effect. Have you been to the carousel yet? What are your thoughts of Nouvel's contrasting design?

The Future Is Video

When CAD rose up in the '80s and began replacing hand-drawing as the preferred means of rendering architecture-to-be, practitioners began decrying the death of the field. Obviously that was not the case, but in our increasingly digitized age/culture/lives, where sexy renderings predominate (to the cost of real architectural discourse, some might say, and probably rightly) on blogs and, uh, architectural websites and beyond, videos are becoming an increasingly important component of the process of placemaking. Or at least competitionwinning, as the above video by SPF:architects shows. When we first turned it up on Curbed today, we were taken aback by the lengths (some might call it desperation, but in these hard times, who can blame them) the firm had gone to to convince the judges of the worthiness of their entry in a competition to design Calgary's new Cantos project, billed as the only "national music centre" in Canada. Turns out, though, all entrants had to produce a video, including Diller Scofidio+Renfro, allied works architecture, Atelier Jean Nouvel, and the lone Canadian firm, Montreal's Saucier + Perotte. Since the LA-based SPF's is naturally Hollywood flashy, how do the other four stack up? Hey! We recognize that cut-out. Rip off! Playing the buildings? Where have we seen that before? For a Pritzker Prize-winner, this sure is chintzy. Dig the tunes.