Posts tagged with "ASLA":

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The American Society of Landscape Architects names their best projects of 2018

Rejoice, lovers of landscape architecture, because the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) has published their 2018 ASLA Professional Awards and awarded their top honors to projects across the U.S. and Canada. The Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates–designed Brooklyn Bridge Park, a project twenty years in the making but closing in on the finish line, took home the Award of Excellence in the General Design category. The transformation of a formerly-industrial landscape into a leisure-oriented waterfront park that simultaneously knits together formerly disconnected communities paved the way for an entire generation of similar projects. Ross Barney Architects and Sasaki’s revitalization of the Chicago Riverwalk, another urban landscape project that has been heavily lauded in the past, was recognized with a General Design Honor award. The ASLA chose a wide variety of winners this year. West 8 Urban Design & Landscape Architecture’s master planning and landscaping of the Main Fountain Garden at the Longwood Gardens was honored alongside a culturally sensitive native cemetery in Nunavut, Canada, and an international sculpture center in the grasslands of Fishtail, Montana. In the Residential Design category, the Word + Carr Design Group’s Balcones Residence in Austin, Texas, received the Award of Excellence. The landscape balances positive and negative space and creates a dialogue with the house’s boxy, concrete forms while requiring little maintenance. The top prize in the Analysis and Planning category went to A Colorado Legacy: I-25 Conservation Corridor Master Plan, a master plan by the Design Workshop - Aspen which created a strategic vision for a 17-mile-long stretch of Interstate 25. Other than offering solutions to the urban sprawl surrounding the interstate, the plan serves strategies for preserving up to 100,000 acres of open space while promoting sensible development. Three projects received Honor awards in the Research category, each tackling resiliency in one form or another. The University of Pennsylvania’s interactive Atlas for the End of the World - Atlas for the Beginning of the Anthropocene tracks the decline of biodiversity worldwide as conservation clashes with development and climate change; Mahan Rykiel Associates tracked the 1.5 million cubic yards of sediment dredged from Baltimore Harbor in Design with Dredge: Resilient Landscape Infrastructure in the Chesapeake Bay; and Ayers Saint Gross explored sustainability strategies for the National Aquarium in Baltimore with their Urban Aquatic Health: Integrating New Technologies and Resiliency into Floating Wetlands project. In the Communications category, the Landscape Architecture Section, Knowlton School, The Ohio State University took the Award of Excellence for their free, online library of historical landscapes. The database, 100 Years of Landscape Architecture at The Ohio State University, offers virtual tours of historical and contemporary landscapes around the world, inlcuding in virtual reality, and is meant to serve as both a teaching and landscape architecture recruiting tool. Last but certainly not least, Design Workshop received the Landmark Award for their From Weapons to Wildlife: The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Management Plan. The ambitious plan demonstrates how a 17,000-acre Superfund site could be converted into one of the country’s largest urban wildlife refuges. Now in its third phase, the plan was put into implantation in 1992 as the U.S. government and Shell struggled to remediate what was once a testing ground for biological and chemical weapons. A full list of this year’s Professional Award winners is available here. No less important are the recently announced 2018 ASLA Student Awards, available here.
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Here are some of our favorite PARK(ing) Day interventions

Today, pocket parklets popped up across the country for Rebar Group's 2017 PARK(ing) Day – now a beloved tradition among public space enthusiasts and designers. According to the PARK(ing) Day Manual, the celebration treats metered parking spots as a "short-term lease for a plot of precious urban real estate." In place of parked cars, a range of creative interventions abound. This year, the American Society of Landscape Architects asked landscape architects all over the country to invest their quarters on temporary, miniature green spaces. Here are some of our favorites from the #ASLAPD17 hashtag on social media. Site Design Group in Chicago built a human-powered hamster wheel, albeit with one glaring design flaw: the absence of an attached grass smoothie machine. In Baltimore, Hord Coplan Macht constructed a peaceful little greenspace with terraced timber seating. D.C.'s Landscape Architecture Bureau (LAB) built a small field of artificial tulips from plastic taken from the Anacostia Watershed. L.A.'s AHBE LAB privileged the deep thatch in a rewilding of a parking space recalling Agnes Denes' 1982 Wheatfield in Battery Park Landfill. https://twitter.com/ahbeland/status/908757935999803392 From Instagram, Seattle's Weisman Design Group created seesaws and tetherballs amid tall grasses that we really wish were permanent. https://www.instagram.com/p/BZEdSumFbSg/?taken-by=weismandesigngroup The ASLA's branch at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona constructed a lovely raised topographic seating area. https://www.instagram.com/p/BZEw2TXlNUZ/?taken-by=asu_asla Finally, in Austin, Texas, Daniel Woodroofe Group put up a hedge public hammocks. https://www.instagram.com/p/BZEqDLjnJ6q/?taken-by=studiodwg Other parklets are permanent. As The New York Times reported in late August, 18 curbside pop-up spaces have appeared across New York City alone (double last year's count), and they're here to stay. Most of these spaces have been created through a partnership between the city's Transportation Department and local groups, including the Parsons School of Design, which created a flexible space called Street Seats with planters constructed of bamboo and movable seating. PARK(ing) Day has catalyzed similar programs nationwide. Regardless of its permanence, parklets remain a charming, temporary form of urban acupuncture expanding public and green space.
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ASLA-NY announces its 2017 Design Awards winners

This year the American Society of Landscape Architects, New York (ASLA-NY) has bestowed five Honor awards and ten Merit awards to New York–based firms for their landscape architecture projects located across the U.S. The winners were selected by a multidisciplinary jury featuring members from ASLA chapters in North and South Carolina, as well as Georgia. "From projects that examine a site’s historic and cultural influences to those that explore innovative design approaches, this year’s winning award submissions showcase the full range of the landscape architectural profession," the ASLA-NY said in a statement. "There is a clear theme of resiliency and sustainability with the award winners that show appreciation for the long-term value of landscapes—again embracing changing conditions of climate and urbanization in the urban projects to appreciation of seasonal characteristics of plants, light and weather in the residential projects." Below is a list of the Honor and Merit awards; the awards themselves will be given to the firms at the ASLA-NY Design Awards Ceremony and Reception (Thursday, April 6, at the Center for Architecture in New York City). These projects will also be on display at the Center through April. Honor Awards Battery Perimeter, Bikeway, Oval and Woodland, Quennell Rothschild & Partners / Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Planners Governors Island Phase 2: The Hills, West 8 Urban Design & Landscape Architecture P.C. / Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects Abstract Morphology, Hollander Design Landscape Architects Navy Pier South Dock and Polk Bros. Plaza, James Corner Field Operations - Hudson Highland Cottage, Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects Merit Awards Olana Strategic Landscape Design Plan, Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects Naval Cemetery, Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects Southwest Brooklyn, AECOM St. Patrick’s Island, W Architecture and Landscape Architecture / Civitas, Inc. Resiliency Rocks Garden, Local Office Landscape and Urban Design Croton Water Filtration Plant, Ken Smith Landscape Architect Compass Resiliency, Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Planners Garden Rising Green Infrastructure Feasibility Study, WE Design / eDesign Dynamics Times Square Reconstruction, Snøhetta The Spiral, BIG - Bjarke Ingels Group
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Plans for D.C.’s Pershing Park mired in debate over protection and progress

Adored by some who consider it a neatly sculpted Modern landscape worthy of protection, and loathed by others who see it as an alienating 1980s byproduct that perpetually falls short in its public duties, Pershing Park conjures up some polarizing perspectives. Located in Northwest D.C. on Pennsylvania Avenue, the park's condition is shopworn, but its redevelopment continues to divide opinions. Home to the WWI General John Pershing memorial (a protected monument) Pershing Park was designed in 1981 by landscape architect M. Paul Friedberg. At the time it was a tranquil environment, a welcome contrast to the hectic urban surrounding. Its layout is ordered, and clean lines run through the park, maintaining a harmonious and symmetrical relationship with the water and greenery—at least, that was what was meant to be. Once upon a time, the park promised to be a place to ice-skate in the winter and relax in the summer. The fountain and ice-skating framework however, have been defunct for years. The water's serenity and sense of calm is easily disrupted when upkeep is ignored as litter fills the pool and steps become dirty. Paving slabs are riddled with cracks and are uneven, the slick lines now lost. It's no coincidence that that idyllic images shown on the American Society of Landscape Architects's website (via The Cultural Landscape Foundation, TCLF) are clearly dated (though the date of the photographs is unknown). Now, the World War I Memorial Centennial Commission is eager for change. A competition which the commission ran in 2015 resulted in architect Joseph Weishaar, landscape architect Phoebe McCormick Lickwar and sculptor Sabin Howard winning with their proposal: The Weight of Sacrifice. The design does away with the water. A problematic feature, seen as a catalyst to the park's downfall, it is replaced by a lawn that is partially surrounded by 10-foot-high walls that hug the perimeter, using bas-reliefs to inform visitors about WWI.
  The aim is to provide more space to relax, but it also sees a change in the park's role, becoming a place for historical education too. Costs are estimated at $38 million by the commission who has currently raised $6 million in their bid to bring about change. Change however, may not come so easily. On the other side, those who fight for the parks protection are attempting to place the park on the National Register of Historic Places. If successful, any changes, regardless of money raised, would be significantly curtailed. It's not hard to see both sides of the argument. On one hand, to maintain the current style and layout of the park pays respect to the WWI General John Pershing memorial of which it was designed to do. On that note, any change would disrupt the relationship between the park and the memorial. Conversely, the space's decline surely implies that it is unsuccessful, so much so that none bother to maintain it. For this to be fixed, more need to be welcomed in and more space is needed to facilitate this. Joe Weishaar argues that the dropped water feature is a “blind spot” and is hence ignored. Sculptor Sabin Howard envisions an “uplifting story of transformation, showing how noble the human race can be.” While the campaign for change gathers steam, the fight for protection does have some weight in the form of Charles Birnbaum, president and CEO of The Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF)  and Darwina Neal, former president of ASLA among others. Here, Birnbaum argues for “making some changes, but keeping the signature and character-defining features intact.” From a withdrawn perspective, one cries out for collaboration between the two parties. Jared Green of The Dirt points out: "Whatever the outcome, one long-term question is: can this park be well-maintained moving forward? If not, we may be back to where we are now 30 years in the future."

2015 Mingle ‘n Jingle Tacoma

Bruce Dees & Associates would like to invite WASLA members and local design professionals to a Holiday Social at their offices in Tacoma. Assorted beverages and appetizers will be provided. This is the sixth annual Mingle N’ Jingle, so be prepared to expect a great time.
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With some help from Gensler, ASLA to turn its headquarters into the Center for Landscape Architecture

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) has tapped Gensler and landscape architecture firm Oehme van Sweden to turn its Washington, D.C. headquarters into the state-of-the-art Center for Landscape Architecture. ASLA bought its 12,000-square-foot home in 1997 for $2.4 million and watched as its value increased to $6.9 million. Since the building was about ready for some fixing up, the society decided it was a good time to go ahead and truly transform it at a cost of $4 million. The building’s existing facade is set to be altered so that the new center is more inviting to passers-by. Inside, the building will be reconfigured to create rooms for meetings and events, exhibitions, a catering kitchen, and restrooms. An existing enclosed double staircase will also be opened to create a three-story atrium that can be dressed up with elements of landscape architecture. The renovation has something for ASLA’s current (and future) employees as well. The new space comes with an upgraded kitchen and restrooms, new conference rooms and administrative space, and even a “wellness room” and “focus rooms." Gensler is aiming for LEED Platinum designation with the renovation. “This is an opportunity to create a facility to reflect the image and ethic of our profession—a world-class Center for Landscape Architecture that will inspire and engage our staff, our membership, allied professionals, public officials and the general public,” said Mark A. Focht, the immediate past president of ASLA, in a statement. ASLA's board of trustees unanimously approved the plan in November and funding is already a third of the way there. Construction is slated to start this fall.
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Heading to Denver for ASLA? Stop by the AN Booth and Say Howdy!

1375803_10152800252102180_1861736163455110674_n Are you heading to the annual American Society of Landscape Architects Annual Meeting in Denver? AN is! Stop by Booth #415, recharge your phone, fuel up on free coffee, and pick up a free copy of the paper at the AN Lounge with furniture provided by Fermob. AN executive editor Alan G. Brake will also be on hand and he would love to hear about your new projects. When you're not in the convention center, check out this selection of things to see and places to eat and drink by AN marketing partner Bison. We hope to see you in Denver! Denver-ASLA-infographic
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ASLA New York to Honor Rebuild by Design Champion, Leader of Governors Island

The New York chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year at the 2014 President’s Dinner Gala. For this occasion, the ASLA has selected the Rockefeller Foundation's Judith Rodin, the Trust for Governors Island's Leslie Koch, and the NY1 News Organization as their honored guests.   All Renderings Courtesy of The Trust for Governors Island The New York chapter of the ASLA was established in 1914 as the second chapter of the national organization and has since become a leader in urban landscape design and architecture. The annual President’s Dinner celebrates the accomplishments and contributions of individuals and groups who have made a prominent and positive impact on the New York architectural community. This year's event will take place on Thursday, November 6 in Tribeca. Judith Rodin, the first of the honorees this year, is the current president of the Rockefeller Foundation and an avid supporter of the Rebuild by Design initiative to increase the resiliency of the Eastern seaboard. As president of the Rockefeller Foundation, Rodin has given the Rebuild for Design competition a great deal of support; the Rockefeller Foundation is the biggest and most generous funding partner of the competition. The second honoree, Leslie Koch, is the president and CEO of the Trust for Governors Island and has been the recipient of numerous awards from various Architectural organizations, including the ASLA. Since taking charge of Governors Island in 2006, Koch has transformed the barren military base into a major public attraction. Finally, NY1 News has had an important role in bringing the news on architecture and urban landscape design to the eyes and ears of New Yorkers. Through their news coverage, NY1 News has provided residents of New York with a greater understanding of issues involving landscape architecture.
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Heading to Boston for the ASLA Conference? So is AN!

Calling all landscape architects and urban designers. Are you heading to Boston for the 2013 American Society of Landscape Architects Conference? I am. On Saturday, November 16, I'll be reviewing projects and portfolios during a "Meet the Editors" event, alongside colleagues from a variety of shelter, design, and garden publications. There are still a few open spots, so sign-up or just drop by and introduce yourself. I hope to see you there. Also, check out this year's ASLA award winners designed by students and professionals. Great work!
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These Winning Student Projects are the Future of Landscape Architecture

Five top student-designed landscape architecture projects across the United States have received Awards of Excellence in The American Society of Landscape Architects’ 2013 Student Awards this month. In the same categories set forth in the society’s Professional Awards, including additional Student Collaboration and Community Service groups, the competition chooses winning entrants based on demonstration of comprehensive planning, environmentally sensitive thinking, and effective presentation, among quality of design and concept. This year, no entrant in the Research category nor the Community Service category received an Award of Excellence; although Honors Awards were granted to a few projects. The ASLA believes that these Student Awards give “a glimpse into the future of the profession.” Recipients and their projects are featured in Landscape Architecture Magazine and will be honored at a ceremony during the ASLA Annual Meeting and EXPO in November. General Design Category Drudge City: Sediment Catalysis Matthew D. Moffitt, Undergraduate Student at Pennsylvania State University ASLA Project Statement:
Unprecedented levels of nutrients currently trigger toxic algae blooms and elicit Lake Erie as a restoration success story. The remediation and re-use of nutrient-laden dredge material are essential strategies within future restoration efforts. Dredge City: sediment catalysis proposes the use of Edison Park in Toledo, Ohio as the site for both the processing of and exposure to sediment gouged from the Toledo Shipping Channel, the greatest producer of material within the Great Lakes system.
Residential Design Category Paths of Life - Rethink the Relationship Between Different Agriculture Landscapes and Community Life Yitian Zhao and Siyu Tian, Graduate Students at University of Pennsylvania ASLA Project Statement:
Because of the very unique climate and landform in New Mexico, the traditional pueblo life style is deeply relying on the understanding and exploiting of local landscape. However, contemporary residential development in this area is somehow ignored such kind of relationship. This project rethought and applied the traditional understanding of agriculture landscape into the contemporary residential development design.
Analysis and Planning Category Natural Water as Cultural Water / A 30 Year Plan for Wabash River Corridor in Lafayette Daniel (Zhicheng) Xu, Undergraduate Student at Perdue Univeristy ASLA Project Statement:
The project seeks to find the balancing point between culture and nature along the Wabash River in Lafayette, Indiana, which is currently underappreciated because of flooding, vacancy and disconnection. The design solution is an embodiment of cultural representation and technology of stormwater management in order to achieve ecological and social resilience. With potential for spontaneous use and dynamic programing, the site can transform into a sustainable infrastructure with a cultural identity that provides active waterfront experience.
Communications Category Above Below Beyond Diana Fernandez, Susan Kolber, and Amy Syverson, Undergraduate Students at Temple University and University of Pennsylvania ASLA Project Statement:
Through a six-week open exhibit and the distribution of an “Exhibit Catalog,” Above Below Beyond has helped to spread the word about the potential of Philadelphia’s Reading Railroad as a public, regenerative space. Landscape architecture and architecture student work provided site context, graphic imaging, and programmatic scenarios. By sharing the often-untapped resource of student work with the public, we helped to start conversations about the future of this amazing railroad.
Student Collaboration Category Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum Brad Allison, Jennifer Coogler, Kyle Cooper, Kaitlyn Hackney, Owen Harris, Jerry Hill, David Loyd, Simon Adam Martin, Austin Moore, Jacqueline Pionan, and Oliver Preus, Undergraduate Students at Mississippi State University ASLA Project Statement:
The submitted project is a 4-year, collaborative, design-build effort focused on the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum. The site was re-envisioned as an enhancement to the museum to expand its programs and redefine its mission, which has allowed it to solidify itself as a cultural amenity within the community. With the concept of “Celebrating the Past while Embracing the Future” the site now displays the most diverse collection of integrated green infrastructure technologies within the region.
All images courtesy ASLA.
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ASLA Picks The World’s Top Professional Landscape Design Projects for 2013

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) announced the winners of their 2013 ASLA Professional Awards, granting landscape design projects from around the world prestigious titles as top works within the field of landscape architecture. The competition included five categories: general design, residential design, analysis and planning, communications, and research. Entries are judged on their quality, context, and effectiveness, and for the two actual design categories, on their environmental sustainability and sensitivity. This year, the winning designs range from an urban revitalization in New Orleans to a book of photographic reflection on the built landscape. General Design Category Lakewood Garden Mausoleum at Lakewood Cemetery Minneapolis, Minnesota Halvorson Design Partnership, Inc. ASLA Project Statement:
The 142-year-old Lakewood Cemetery faced a challenge: how to create a commemorative 21st century space within a revered, landmark setting. The Garden Mausoleum project meets this challenge adroitly, sustainably and gracefully. With the landscape enveloping two thirds of the building within a south-facing slope, architecture opens out onto an expansive, peaceful landscape with a quiet reflecting pool, groves of native trees and contemplative alcoves—a distinctly contemporary design in harmony with its historic environment.
Residential Design Category Sagaponack Residence Sagaponeck, New York LaGuardia Design Landscape Architects ASLA Project Statement:
In order to save their beloved house from the incessant and inevitably threatening encroachment of the Atlantic Ocean, the owners of this 1970's award winning “Record House” were willing to relocate their home in a more protected site. The house was then relocated some 400 feet further inland to the middle of a flat cornfield. The challenge for the Landscape Architect was to gracefully ensconce the simultaneously enlarged structure within a recreated landscape of undulating, grassy sand dunes and meadows, regenerating the natural environment lost with the erosion, but the ultimate goal of this project was to fabricate a self-sustaining landscape able to naturally grow for creating a resistant environment against the aggression of natural elements.
Analysis and Planning Category Lafitte Greenway + Revitalization Corridor | Linking New Orleans Neighborhoods New Orleans, Louisiana Design Workshop, Inc. ASLA Project Statement:
As one of the first revitalization projects since the devastation of 2005's Hurricane Katrina, the 3.1-mile linear Lafitte Greenway will become a vibrant, multi-modal transportation corridor linking residents to the heart of New Orleans, Louisiana. The landscape architect led a multi-disciplinary effort—incorporating public input, synthesizing many measurable objectives and working across a range of scales—to transform an old industrial rail corridor into a celebrated Greenway.
Communications Category Visible | Invisible: Landscape Works of Reed Hilderbrand Reed Hilderbrand, LLC. ASLA Project Statement:
Visible | Invisible explores the preoccupations, influences, themes, and challenges that shape how the principals and designers at Reed Hilderbrand reflect on their work. In contrast to the recent tendency to illustrate conceptual depth through diagram, three-dimensional illustration, and process drawings, this book relies on photographic representations of built work—through the interpretive lens of an artist and through plan drawings—to evidence consistency in approach and outcome. The result is an expository work that speaks of values, convictions, and aspirations toward humanistic achieve.
Research Category Green Roof Innovation Testing (GRIT) Laboratory Toronto, Ontario, Canada University of Toronto, John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design ASLA Project Statement:
The Green Roof Innovation Testing Laboratory (GRIT Lab) is a state-of-the-art research facility and the only one of its kind in North America that studies the optimization of green roof performance. GRIT Lab includes real time data monitoring and ongoing field observation to study the metrics associated with ‘green' technologies in order to provide an unprecedented, comprehensive, dynamic and hands-on understanding of the water–energy–biology nexus in context of regional and climate specific priorities.
All Images Courtesy ASLA.
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ASLA Launches Guide on Health Benefits of Nature

asla-health-guide-01 The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) has launched a new online guide to educate folks on the benefits of exposing themselves to nature. The polemic makes the case that there are long- and short-term health advantages of spending time alfresco, whether in the wilderness or in community parks. Health Benefits of Nature involves hundreds of case studies, research studies, and news articles that are categorized into 23 health concerns such as depression, asthma, stress, and general health to emphasize nature as a critical health tool. Working with top experts in the field, ASLA “created this guide to expand public awareness about the benefits of green spaces, as well as to urge people to get out and take advantage of the designed and natural landscapes available to them,” explained Nancy Somerville, CEO of ASLA. The online guide is easily navigable; each health topic is briefly introduced, and is followed by sections focusing on “How Nature Helps,” research, resources, organizations, the “Role of the Landscape Architect,” and case studies. The guide, which is part of ASLA’s series of sustainable design resources, highlights the benefits of both the natural wilderness and public green spaces. For instance, in urban and suburban areas, nature provides an opportunity to break from routine stressors, and landscape architects work to make nature more accessible within communities by planning safe, attractive, and recuperative spaces. Communities can utilize ASLA’s guide to discover how they can collaborate with landscape architects to successfully incorporate nature into the built environment, thereby introducing opportunities to go outside and exercise. The public is invited to contribute additional research by emailing info@asla.orgHealth Benefits of Nature has arrived just in time for ASLA’s launching of The Landscape Architect’s Guide to Boston, which is set for next Monday.