Posts tagged with "Arts & Crafts":

American Craft Exposition

ACE 2019 will showcase over 140 artists with one-of-a-kind pieces and museum-quality artwork. A highly competitive juried show, ACE features hand-crafted work in 12 media – baskets, ceramics, fiber decorative, fiber wearable, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper and wood. Proceeds from ACE benefit increased access to mental health services at NorthShore University HealthSystem. These critical funds are raised through Benefit Preview Party tickets, general admission tickets, sponsorships and our voluntary Craft for a Cause program. ACE does not receive a portion of proceeds from artist sales.

American Craft Exposition

ACE 2019 will showcase over 140 artists with one-of-a-kind pieces and museum-quality artwork. A highly competitive juried show, ACE features hand-crafted work in 12 media – baskets, ceramics, fiber decorative, fiber wearable, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper and wood. Proceeds from ACE benefit increased access to mental health services at NorthShore University HealthSystem. These critical funds are raised through Benefit Preview Party tickets, general admission tickets, sponsorships and our voluntary Craft for a Cause program. ACE does not receive a portion of proceeds from artist sales.

American Craft Exposition

ACE 2019 will showcase over 140 artists with one-of-a-kind pieces and museum-quality artwork. A highly competitive juried show, ACE features hand-crafted work in 12 media – baskets, ceramics, fiber decorative, fiber wearable, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper and wood. Proceeds from ACE benefit increased access to mental health services at NorthShore University HealthSystem. These critical funds are raised through Benefit Preview Party tickets, general admission tickets, sponsorships and our voluntary Craft for a Cause program. ACE does not receive a portion of proceeds from artist sales.
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A couple's lifelong George Nakashima collection on auction at Freeman's

Known as perhaps the most diverse collections of works by George Nakashima, the Roth Collection chronicles a relationship that one family forged over three decades with the artist. The George Nakashima Roth collection recalls the family's intimate visits with the artist to select furniture for their home—and now they are up for sale at the Freeman’s Design auction on October 8th. As the story goes, longtime couple Arnold "Archie" and Corinne "Cookie" Roth grew up primarily in New York in the 1920s and 1930s, met through mutual friends, married in 1950, and settled in Brooklyn. With humble beginnings, Corrine, the science teacher, taught in the New York public school system and Archie, an engineer, became the part-time owner of a small die cutting business. In 1966, they relocated to Livingston, New Jersey, where they remained through their lives. Fueled by a mutual devotion to modern design, the pair collected works that were indicative of their taste: wooden furniture that would be categorized by the auction houses as organic modernist. From the early turned-leg coffee table ordered in 1961 to the monolithic bench and cushion chairs from the Conoid series (dating to 1979 and 1980 respectively), Nakashima's work was handpicked by the Roths over the span of three decades. Each piece is a part of the story that unfolds, surveying Nakashima's evolving design sensibility and craftsmanship – the fusion and jutxaposition of two incongruous cultures, American vernacular and traditional Japanese craftsmanship.     His marriage of natural materials and hand craftsmanship illustrates his vision of the construction of a chair: function, beauty, and simplicity. When you look at Nakashima’s creations, you can see the the influence of American arts and crafts furniture, specifically the Windsor chair and the “captain's chair.” The Windsor influence is most apparent in the Straight Back chair, the Mira chair, the Four-Legged chair, the New chair, and to a lesser extent, the Conoid chair (the armchairs are a streamlined form of what is commonly referred to as the captain's chair). The New and Conoid chairs remain aesthetically tied to the Windsor, juxtaposed with a contemporary-looking Japanese yoke back and crest rail. In this poetic gesture, the Conoid chair became a modern design icon inspired by the 1924 and 1927 cantilevered chairs designed by Heinz and Bodo Rasch. Eventually, this unexpected and expressive combination of Eastern, Western, and modern influences came to shape each chair and evolve into the distinctly idiosyncratic design that would characterize the work of George Nakashima. You can view the complete catalogue online here. Freeman's: Design features works by George Nakashima, René Lalique, Eero Saarinen, Finn Juhl, and others. In advance of the auction, you can browse lots before live bidding begins on Sunday, October 8th at 12:00pm ET.
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Enormous architecture-shaped pillows will fill a vacant field for Chicago's third annual Ragdale Ring

A suburban field on Chicago's North Shore will host a fantastical summer pavilion fashioned after a toy box, with outsized pillows in the shape of architectural elements, according to designs selected as the winner of the third annual Ragdale Ring competition. Young Chicago designers Design With Company (Dw/Co) took their cues from the original Ragdale Ring garden theatre designed by architect Howard Van Doren Shaw in 1912. The Ragdale Foundation was founded in 1897 on the grounds of Arts and Crafts architect Shaw’s summer home in Lake Forest, Illinois, 30 miles north of Chicago. Architects Stewart Hicks and Allison Newmeyer dubbed their contemporary interpretation of the outdoor theater Shaw Town. Dw/Co plucked architectural details from some of Shaw's early 20th century buildings in the Chicago area—such as the rooftops of Market Square in Lake Forest and the Quadrangle Club at the University of Chicago—and created “audience-friendly pillows” in their form, to be stored in a giant wooden toy box when not in use. “The moveable pillows sprinkled across the landscape are intended to be used by the audience in a multitude of ways from seating to play,” reads Ragdale's announcement. “Visitors are encouraged to rediscover Shaw’s buildings without even knowing it.” Last year's winner, New York–based Bittertang Farm, sculpted an earthen grotto from packs of hay. (See a gallery of photos from that installation here.) Like Bittertang's ring, Shaw Town is also made from biodegradable materials. Shaw Town, whose construction will be funded by a $15,000 production grant, debuts June 13 at 1230 North Green Bay Road, Lake Forest, Illinois. More information can be found on Ragdale's website, ragdale.org.
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On View> Craft Spoken Here at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Craft Spoken Here Philadelphia Museum of Art 26th St. and Benjamin Franklin Pkwy. Philadelphia, PA Through August 12 Since it was founded in 1876, the Philadelphia Museum of Art has collected and exhibited crafts; the collection today includes 20th- and 21st-century works from across the globe. With Craft Spoken Here, the Museum presents the medium of crafting as a common language of technique, material, and form that defies cultural boundaries and historical categorization. Drawing from the museum’s collection as well as works on loan from artists and private collections, the exhibition will include some 40 works by acclaimed and lesser-known craftsman alike, with contemporary pieces from 1960 to the present, including The One, 1985 by Rebecca Medel (above). Representing the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Europe with works in ceramic, glass, metal, wood, lacquer, paper, and fiber, the works on display show the breadth of the medium and highlight the qualities of craft that transcend culture and time.
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Event> Happy 125th, Pasadena!

Pasadena is celebrating its 125th Anniversary today and will continue partying all month and into the fall. Now a significant city with over 140,000 residents, it was a rural settlement when it decided to become the fourth city to incorporate in Los Angeles County on June 12, 1886. While many know Pasadena for its Rose Bowl, Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena Playhouse, and California Institute of Technology, the city is also home to “Bungalow Heaven,” a 16-block Historic Landmark District neighborhood featuring nearly 1,000 Craftsman bungalows. This month features tours of these homes and more. Pasadena was one of the hubs of the American Arts & Crafts movement, which emphasized simplicity of design, hand-made craftsmanship, functionality and natural elements. Typical one-and-a-half story Craftsman bungalows were designed with an open floor plan, wide verandas, broad roofs and polished wood interiors and seamlessly linked the indoors with the out. Perhaps the most famous practitioners of the style were architecture firm Greene & Greene. Established by brothers Charles and Henry Greene, the early 20th century duo designed their bungalow and ultimate bungalow style houses for well-to-do residents. Nine Greene & Greene homes including the Gamble House, the Blacker House, the Freeman Ford House, and the Duncan-Irwin House pepper the city. Special walking tours of these Arts & Crafts homes led by Gamble House docents will take place Saturday, June 18 and Saturday, July 16 at 10am. Admission is $15 and reservations are required. For more information, visit here. In addition, brochures for a self-guided walking tour are available at the Gamble House bookstore. To honor its 125th anniversary as a city, Pasadena began celebrating with a birthday party extravaganza at the Pasadena Museum of History yesterday, followed by concerts, fireworks and more in the summer and fall. For a list of other 125th celebration highlights visit the City of Pasadena website.