Posts tagged with "Art":

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"Sculpture City" Invites Dialogue On Public Art in St. Louis

It’s open season for public art in St. Louis, according to the groups behind Sculpture City St. Louis 2014—an ongoing festival “intended to draw attention to the rich presence sculpture has in the visual landscape of our region.” The programming leads up to and continues after an April conference. Art exhibitions throughout the year aim to continue the conversation. For instance, Art of Its Own Making, a show at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts that features sculpture, installation, film, and performance works through August 20. St. Louis Sculpture City showcases public art, sculpture, and design throughout the year, before and after its April 10–12 conference “Monument / Anti-Monument,” which will encourage dialogue about art and public life. A full list of the shows and events that make up the ongoing examination of public art is available on the group's website. Non-profit institutions, for-profit enterprises, and government/civic art programs with programming within 100 miles of downtown St. Louis during 2014 can submit their program to Sculpture City St. Louis, which may list them on their website. St. Louis is a fitting place for the topic. From the two-block sculpture park dubbed CityGarden to plans for a revamped park at the base of the Gateway Arch, it’s a busy time for public space in St. Louis.
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On View> "Roads of Arabia" Exhibition on Saudi Arabian Archaeology Opens December 19 in Houston

Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia The Museum of Fine Arts Houston 5601 Main Street Houston, Texas December 19 through March 9, 2014 The Museum of Fine Arts Houston (MFAH) is hosting an eye-opening exhibition this winter that will uncover the rich history of the ancient trade routes of the Arabian Peninsula. Organized by the Smithsonian’s Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, D.C., in association with the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities (SCTA), Roads of Arabia will feature objects recently excavated from more than 10 archaeological sites, and give insight into the culture and economy of this ancient civilization. Recently discovered objects along the trade routes include alabaster bowls and fragile glassware as well as heavy gold earrings and monumental statues. All of the artifacts are testament to the lively exchange between Arabs and their neighbors, including the Egyptians, Syrians, Babylonians, and Greco-Romans.
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New Public Art in Brooklyn Lends Transportation a Sense of Play

In Brooklyn, a new temporary public artwork brings the asphalt plane of 4th Avenue to a playful, three-dimensional life. On the avenue’s concrete median between 3rd and 4th streets, the New York City Department of Transportation’s Urban Art Program has chosen work by artist Emily Weiskopf for its latest public art installation. Unparallel Way is a 120-feet-long sculpture comprised of two parallel aluminum strips in the same bright yellow as the double traffic lines guiding vehicles driving on adjacent roads. In a clever distortion of those painted stripes, Weiskopf’s parallel lines sweep from the ground at irregular heights, creating parabolic curves that rarely match. The installation piece is a public art extension of Brooklyn Utopias: In TRANSITion, a current exhibition at Old Stone House (OSH) exploring 19 artists’ visions of New York City public transportation and its relationship to public space. DOT has partnered with OSH for the display of these utopian artistic ideas addressing issues within urban public transit. Unparallel Way underwent an official on-site unveiling ceremony this morning with presentations by associates from OSH and DOT.
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On View> "Of Walking" at Chicago's Museum of Contemporary Photography

Of Walking Museum of Contemporary Photography 660 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago Through December 20 The Museum of Contemporary Photography’s exhibition, Of Walking, explores how the simple act of walking gives rise to countless intricate thoughts. Although walking may be perceived as one of mankind’s most simple acts, it triggers a series of emotions and contemplations. Of Walking shows that it is not just about putting one foot in front of the other, nor is it solely the motion from point A to point B. The curators sought to demonstrate how the process of thinking is made possible by the act of walking. To illustrate this concept, the exhibition goes back to the history of photography by showcasing famous streetwalkers and photographers such as Eugène Atget and Garry Winogrand. It focuses on navigation through space to determine how walking becomes a foundation for the human thought process. As such, it looks at movements in the history of art that have addressed the act of walking, and the works of artists such as Sohei Nishino that have evoked how meanderings through the surrounding built environment provoke numerous feelings for the individual. Finally, the exhibition also features the works of artists who have looked at political and social situations through interactions and walks through various landscapes.
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On View> Jennifer Steinkamp Turns the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis Inside Out

Jennifer Steinkamp: Street Views Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis 3750 Washington Blvd, St. Louis, MO Through December 23 The Contemporary Art Museum of St. Louis has inaugurated Street Views, an exhibition featuring a series of works by digital installation media artist Jennifer Steinkamp. As part of the 10th anniversary of CAM’s building, the museum will be turned inside out, as its exterior will be transformed into a gallery with large-scale video art being projected onto its facade. Through the use of powerful projectors and intricate computer algorithms, Steinkamp will transform the museum’s metallic and concrete structure into a dynamic garden capturing a mesmerizing natural environment. Her utilization of video and new media enables the viewer to explore different ideas about architecture, design, motion, and interpretation. The use of vernacular imagery conveys the power of nature and enables visitors to perceive the building through a different lens, thus providing them with a new synaesthetic experience. This innovative outdoor moving image series strikes a balance between the natural landscape and computer-generated imagery. By transforming CAM’s building into a compelling projection screen, Steinkamp brings digital media into the mainstream of contemporary art.
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Doug Aitken's "Station to Station" Winds Its Way Across the Country

On Friday night at Riverfront Studios, motion-picture soundstages on 3 acres of East River waterfront between the Williamsburg Bridge and the Navy Yard, the newest art project by Doug Aitken called Station to Station was launched. Aitken did the “destruction” of Gallery 303 last year, Creative Time’s Broken Screen Happening at the Essex Street Market and Sleepwalkers projected on the wall of MoMA’s Sculpture Garden. On the site of the former Schaefer Brewery, spotted in the crowd was Agnes Gund, Klaus Biesenbach, Chrissie Iles, Roxana Marcoci, Linda Yablonsky, Lisa Phillips and other art world luminaries. This event marked the inaugural nomadic “Happening” that moves in an Aitken-designed train from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Coast stopping at nine different locations each time for a one-night-only live event in September. The scene was set for live performances that included a colorful site-specific smoke bomb installation by Olaf Breuning; food happening created by artist Rirkrit Tiravanija; and an original performance choreographed by Jonah Bokaer inspired by Robert Rauschenberg's Pelican (1963) on the occasion of work’s 50th anniversary and more. Being a nomadic endeavor, five artists were commissioned to create yurts, portable tent-like dwelling traditionally used by nomads in Central Asia. So bright they could be seen from the Manhattan side, all the yurts are 17 feet in diameter and made of canvas by Canadian firm Yurta, I was magnetically drawn to Ernesto Neto’s bright yellow bubble with circles punched out, and the discards scattered on the grass like pebbles. Inspired by his home city Rio de Janero’s beaches, the floor of this yurt was soft like walking on the sand. I then floated into Urs Fischer’s white yurt through a foggy mist, and landed on a king-size bed with spinning disco ball above and mirrors all around -- a hedonistic yurt that was hard to leave. This is contrasted with Liz Glynn’s black felt maze, a dark interior that reminded me of getting lost in a Richard Serra sculpture. Over the course of the train’s journey she will create a different model of the universe, moving from the Big Bang theory to Hubble's expanding universe and beyond. 86-year old underground experimental filmmaker Kenneth Anger has created a bright red glowing tent with three screens featuring his films Demon Brother (1969), Lucifer Rising (1981), and Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome (1954). A pentagonal seating cushion centers the space. If you saw Carsten Höller’s Experience at the New Museum last year that featured a slide between two floors, his iridescent orange Ball- and Frisbee-House wouldn’t be a surprise. Entering through a hole and landing on the squishy floor that supports pliable columns, you can play with projectiles. Inside Riverside Studios, additional yurts were settings for local artists and artisans from Folk Fibers, Cobra Boots, Chimayo, and Junkyard Jeans crafting products in real time. But because this is the only venue that is on the water but not on a railway, we didn’t get to see Aitken’s train car. To do so, visit Station to Station as is winds its way across the country. Chicago. September 10. Union Station Minneapolis/St. Paul. Setpember 12. St. Paul Union Depot Santa Fe, Setpemer 18. Santa Fe Railyard Winslow, AZ. September 21. La Posada Barstow, CA. September 24. Skyline Drive-in Theater Los Angeles, CA. September 26. Union Station Oakland/San Francisco. 16th St. Station
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As Detroit Struggles With Bankruptcy, Auction House Appraises Prized Art Collection

Even as Detroit’s municipal bankruptcy reverberates among residents and onlookers alike, the city’s art scene shines on. Unfortunately for the Detroit Institute of Art, red ink may yet claim its city-owned collection. This week the museum confirmed Christie’s Appraisals had been hired to appraise a portion of the cultural institution’s holdings. But an appraisal is not a sale. The city’s art collection includes work by Rodin, Van Gogh, and Cézanne. The museum denied the possibility of a fire sale, saying in a statement:

We continue to believe there is no reason to value the collection as the Attorney General has made clear that the art is held in charitable trust and cannot be sold as part of a bankruptcy proceeding. We applaud the [Emergency Manager]’s focus on rebuilding the City, but would point out that he undercuts that core goal by jeopardizing Detroit's most important cultural institution.

Christie’s, too, deflected scrutiny of what many perceived as the beginning of the end for a proud collection of art. “We understand that a valuation of all the City’s assets (extending well beyond the art) is one of the many steps that will be necessary for the legal system to reach a conclusion about the best long term solution,” they said in a separate statement, adding their goal is to advise on "how to realize value for the City while leaving the art in the City’s ownership.” The auction house’s assessment doesn’t mean all or even any of the 60,000-piece collection will be sold or even leased (some are off-limits anyway if their original benefactor stipulated they can never be sold). Assessment would be the first step in a such a process, but it could also mean Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr is just showing creditors that all options are on the table. Financial experts speculated to The Christian Science Monitor that sales of city land or infrastructure, such as its sewer system, could be better bets. Detroit’s municipal bankruptcy is the biggest by far in U.S. history, so Orr’s decisions—whatever they may be—are anyone's guess, and will doubtless be the subject of intense scrutiny.
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Giant Sea Creatures To Invade Chicago's State Street

The Chicago Loop Alliance will wrap the Century Building at 202 S. State Street with a mural depicting a downtown overrun by giant sea creatures. “Float,” by St. Louis artist Noah MacMillan, calls to mind one of the many action movies in which outsized monsters have laid waste to the Loop in computer-generated battle royales of late. But these octopi and puffer fish appear to float along benignly. MacMillan’s surreal illustrations and designs have been featured in Smithsonian Magazine, the Washington Post and elsewhere. His 500-square-foot mural, which will be unveiled Tuesday July 16, was commissioned by building owners The General Services Administration, who asked MacMillan to ponder the relationship of citizens and their government. The 16-story building was designed by Holabird and Roche. Chicago Loop Alliance’s other recent programs include of the Pop-Up Art Loop, a year-long art gallery series, and The Gateway, a "people plaza" on State Street.
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Frank Gehry's Ice Blocks Chilling Out Inside Chicago's Inland Steel Building

Follow the Architecture Chicago Plus blog as Lynn Becker raises an eyebrow at the new sculpture that quietly popped up in the lobby of downtown Chicago’s celebrated Inland Steel Building. The 1957 SOM icon seems to have acquired a consortium of ice hunks, courtesy Frank Gehry. Ostensibly a formal counterpoint to the elegant energy of Richard Lippold’s Radiant I, the original lobby art, Gehry’s glass agglomeration (fabricated by the John Lewis Glass Studio of Oakland, California) frames Radiant I and responds to its angularity with carved blobs. It’s admittedly atypical in the setting of the modernist masterpiece, but doesn’t overpower the space or the original artwork.
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The Doors Project: Projecting Gateways onto Obstacles

In an ongoing endeavor to blend public art, architecture, and urbanism by artists Siyuan and Hwee Chong, The Doors Project subversively projects a series of doors onto public spaces in Singapore, reflecting the struggles of the urban poor and underprivileged. But while commenting on despair, the real message is one of faith, hope and empowerment. “We wanted to make a statement about life, and jolt people to think,” the artists said in an interview at Yolo. “Instead of following the light at the end of the tunnel, why not carry our own lights, and create our own doors! It’s really about rolling up our sleeves, and creating the opportunities we want for ourselves.” Inspired by true stories of people they’ve met—from a boy mastering kung fu to protect his mother from his abusive father to an Indian worker desperately raising money for his son’s surgery—the installation provokes the viewer to re-imagine boundaries as thresholds, opacity as reflection, and life’s roadblocks as opportunities. “These people, despite much hoping and praying, are faced with countless roadblocks that take them nowhere,” they said. According to Siyuan and Hwee Chong, people should take a giant leap of faith, work hard at what they believe in most, and open their own “doors” in life. “It’s just more meaningful that way.” Expect more public installations from Siyuan and Hwee Chong in the near future. “’Doors is meant to be an ongoing project. There’s no end date to it. For as long as we keep collecting stories of hope and despair, we’ll keep projecting people’s ‘doors’ onto roadblocks.” Read the full interview with the artists at Yolo or check out The Doors Project's website for more.  
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Storm Brews Over New Jersey Plan to Destroy Tacha Sculpture

The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) debacle in New Jersey over a unilateral decision to destroy a sculpture by landscape artist Athena Tacha has begun to slip into the public consciousness. The irony that the plaza piece, titled Green Acres, is to be destroyed by a department with environment in its name has not been lost on many. Apparently, the DEP has a $1 million EPA grant burning a hole in its pocket and plans to replace the sculpture with eco-friendly pavers. The waste has not gone undetected. Philadelphia Inquirer critic Inga Saffron writes in today's column: "There is nothing wrong with the DEP's making its property more sustainable. But why start with the little plaza when its offices are surrounded by sprawling parking lots paved with the usual impervious asphalt?" Now it remains to be seen whether the agency will be impervious to its critics.
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A Spinning Piper Seneca Lands in Central Park

It's a bird! It's a plane! No, it's actually a plane. On the corner of 60th Street and 5th Avenue in Manhattan, a six-seat, twin-engine Piper Seneca aircraft balances on two vertical steel posts positioned at the end of its wings, playfully rotating on its own axis and likely confusing visitors to Central Park. After doing a double take on the surreal scene, find a plaque located nearby and you'll learn that this mysterious aircraft is actually an installation by artist Paola Pivi, whose portfolio includes scenes of zebras on snowy mountaintops and arenas of screaming people. Working with the Public Art Fund, an organization dedicated to present artists’ work throughout New York City, Paola Pivi opened her newest installation featuring the Piper Seneca, How I Roll last Wednesday, June 20th. Like much of Paola Pivi's work, How I Roll challenges the onlookers to broaden their imagination and perceive something that's usually inconceivable in reality. Frozen in a continuous loop-the-loop at ground level, the aircraft dismisses its own identity as a flying machine, floating and spinning effortlessly on the edge of the park. By ignoring its own gargantuan weight and the context of flying high in the sky, plane becomes an object, a sculpture, perhaps finally linking industrial design and sculpture. Just take a look at it spinning in the video above, or, even better, get your own in-person dose of surrealism by visiting Pivi's How I Roll any time day or night through August 26th.